• Photos: Opening Night of 'FADE'

    by John Moore | Feb 13, 2016
    FADE in Denver

    Photos from the DCPA Theatre Company's world-premiere performance of FADE, on Feb. 12. To see more photos, click the forward button on the image above. All photos may be downloaded for free directly from the Flickr album above.

    Fade Opening Night. Photo by John Moore. Our gallery includes photos backstage before the show, and from the celebration after the performance. One portion of the album includes photos from Club Denver, which serves at the lobby of the Ricketson Theatre. It was transformed to look like an actual TV writers' room on a Hollywood lot to give audience members a feel for the world of the play before they went inside the theatre.

    In Tanya Saracho's new play FADE, the Mexican-born Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers, with unexpected consequences. 'FADE' is directed by Jerry Ruiz and features Mariana Fernández as Lucia and Eddie Martinez as Abel.

    FADE plays through March 13 in the Ricketson Theatre. More information below.

    Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. (Pictured above, from left: Director Jerry Ruiz, Eddie Martinez, Tanya Saracho and Mariana Fernández. Below: Eddie Martinez has his Marines tattoo applied backstage before the show with the help of the DCPA's Lisa Parsons.)

    FADE. Eddie Martinez. Photo by John Moore.  




    Video: Your first look at FADE:


    Video by David Lenk for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE: Ticket information

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Through March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Previous NewsCenter coverage of FADE:
     
    FADE production photos:


    FADEPhotos by Adams Visual Communications.
  • Meet the cast: Mariana Fernández of 'FADE'

    by Olivia Jansen | Feb 12, 2016
    Mariana Fernandez in rehearsal for FADE. Photo by John Moore.
    Mariana Fernandez, shown in rehearsal for FADE: "I think we can all relate to how our choices in life determine where we are and where we go and who gets to tell our story." Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    MEET MARIANA FERN
    ÁNDEZ

    Lucía in FADE

    Mariana Fernandez QuoteAt the DCPA: Debut. New York credits include Disjointed Love Shorts (Ticket2Eternity.) Regional: Reasons to be Pretty (Phoenix Theatre Indianapolis) As Bees in Honey Drown (StageWest Fort Worth) Jason and Claire (San Diego Old Globe.)

    • Hometown: Born in Tampico, Mexico, and grew up in San Diego
    • Training: BFA from Texas Christian University and MFA from Purdue University
    • The role that changed your life: I was fortunate enough to be able to do the role of Blanche DuBois from A Streetcar Named Desire as my thesis role in graduate school. Putting that amount of research and energy into a role that was so far from anything I ever thought I would play really taught me discipline and what it means to immerse yourself in a role. From the text to the accent to the complexity, the role was one of the most challenging and beautiful experiences I’ve ever had.
    • Why are you an actor? Theatre was never part of my childhood or extracurricular activities growing up. I knew that I loved to read, to explore, to delve into characters and how they function, so as soon as I took an acting class in high school, I knew it was what I wanted to pursue as a career.
    • What would you be doing for a career if you weren’t an actor? Career-wise, I don’t see myself doing anything else. Nothing would be as fulfilling. There was a part of me that desired to be the host of “The Voice." Mostly because you were able to interact with this incredible amount of talent and you were able to hear the singers’ stories and got the chance to cheer them on with their families as they attempted to fulfill their dream. Otherwise, I hope to be a mother one day. That would be the only other passion that would be on par and beyond with doing theatre.
    • Meryl StreepIdeal scene partner: Meryl Streep is someone I deeply admire, so in a perfect world, I’d get to do a play with her. Not a movie - a play. She got her start in theatre and she is brilliant in everything she does. I feel like she would challenge and inspire me. Mark Rylance is also another actor who has just blown me away onstage. He is perfect. He gives so much to every actor that is onstage with him. These are just dreams, of course. I have just been blown away by their work.
    • Why does FADE matter? When I first read FADE, I was moved by how relatable it was. Not just because of how it dealt with class issues that are so prevalent in Latin-American cultures, but by the dynamic and relationship by the two characters. This play is so honest. Honest about how class works within the Mexican culture, honest about how it is still a struggle to be an educated woman in a man’s world, honest in how our generation is so programmed to succeed and move forward no matter what the price is. This play tackles all those issues and more. You don’t have to be Latino to identify with these characters. I think we can all relate to how our choices in life determine where we are and where we go and who gets to tell our story.
    • What do you hope the audience gets out of it? I can only hope they get a deeper sense of how within a culture there are different worlds and personalities and that we don’t have to stereotype anyone. We are all complex beings, and in this day and age, there are so many things that bring you together, no matter what your background. This is the human experience. We can all relate to each other in different situations.  This is an extraordinary play that brings up issues about race, class and gender but also interpersonal relationships and how we relate to each other.
    • Finish this sentence: "All I want is ..."
      ... for people to choose love. This was a lesson I learned in the theatre about exploring a scene and it translates into everything we do. I even wear this motto on a mantra bracelet on my wrist, 'Choose Love.' If your words and your actions come from a place of compassion and love … love toward the world, toward one another, I feel like we can all do and be better people.


    • FADE: Ticket information

    • By Tanya Saracho
    • Through March 13
    • Ricketson Theatre
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • TTY: 303-893-9582
    • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
    • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

    Previous 2015-16 'Meet the Cast' profiles:
    Meet
    Adeoye of Lookingglass Alice and All the Way
    Meet Kevin Berntson of The Nest
    Meet J. Paul Boehmer of As You Like It
    Meet Molly Brennan of Lookingglass Alice
    Meet Courtney Capek of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Todd Cerveris of All the Way
    Meet Brian D. Coats of The Nest
    Meet Tad Cooley of Tribes
    Meet Paul DeBoy of All the Way
    Meet Allen Dorsey of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Kevin Douglas of Lookingglass Alice
    Meet Napoleon M. Douglas of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Brian Dykstra of The Nest
    Meet Isabel Ellison of Tribes
    Meet Mariana Fernandez of FADE
    Meet Kate Finch of Tribes
    Meet Ella Galaty of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Mike Hartman of All the Way
    Meet Ben Heil of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Carolyn Holding of As You Like It
    Meet Drew Horwitz of As You Like It
    Meet Maurice Jones of As You Like It
    Meet Geoffrey Kent of As You Like It and All the Way
    Meet Emily Kron of As You Like It
    Meet Nick LaMedica of As You Like It
    Meet Victoria Mack of The Nest
    Meet Andrew Pastides of Tribes
    Meet Shannan Steele of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Carly Street of The Nest
    Meet Samuel Taylor of Lookingglass Alice
    Meet Lindsey Noel Whiting of Lookingglass Alice
    Meet Jake Williamson  of A Christmas Carol
    Meet Matt Zambrano of As You Like It

  • 'FADE' Perspectives: Why ARE writers' rooms so drab?

    by John Moore | Feb 10, 2016
    FADE Jerry Ruiz and Timothy R. Mackabee. Photo by John Moore. 'FADE' Perspectives conversation on Feb. 5 at The Jones Theatre, from left:

    Director Jerry Ruiz, Scenic Designer Timothy R. Mackabee and DCPA Literary Manager Doug Langworthy. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Perspectives is a series of free panel conversations moderated by DCPA Theatre Company Literary Manager Douglas Langworthy. They take place from 6 p.m. to 6:45 on the evening of each production's first preview performance. The next Perspectives will be held April 8 (discussing Sweeney Todd) in the Jones Theatre. No reservations necessary.

     



    In Tanya Saracho's world-premiere play FADE, opening Friday (Feb. 12) in the Ricketson Theatre, Mexican-born Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers, with unexpected consequences.

    Here’s some of what we learned from Literary Manager Douglas Langworthy’s conversation with FADE Director Jerry Ruiz and Scenic Designer Timothy R. Mackabee. The production's two actors, you soon will learn, were off learning brand new lines for Saracho's play. They are Mariana Fernández as Lucia and Eddie Martinez as Abel.

    1 Perspectives Why are TV writers' rooms so drab? FADE is set in a TV writer's office in Los Angeles. And TV writers’ rooms are not just drab. “They are crappy,” says Mackabee, who has the opportunity to work on several TV shows. “The funny thing about these rooms is that they are made for creative people do wonderful things, and they are the most awful rooms you could ever want to be in in your life.” Considering the budgets these shows have, who go so cheap on the aesthetics? "Usually a show rents a space to work and then you go out and rent a bunch of horrible Ikea furniture because the show might last only one season - and that's it. So there is never money or effort spent on these spaces because they are so temporary in nature.”

    Macakabee’s scenic design for FADE intentionally makes the Lucia's work space very cramped. “We are only using about a third of the Ricketson Theatre stage because we want it to be claustrophobic," he said. "These two cannot get away from each other.”

    For this production, Club Denver (located just outside of the Ricketson Theatre lobby), will be curated to look like a TV writing room, complete lousy furniture and bad lighting, to give the audience a sense of the play's environment even before walking into the theatre. 

    2 Perspectives What is the meaning of the title? “Originally, I think Tanya chose FADE because ‘fade to black’ is a common TV term,” Ruiz said. “But I also think it refers to our protagonist. Lucia comes into this job with a very clear sense of purpose. She has a mission she wants to accomplish on this TV show. But along the way, she gets so caught up in trying to survive in this shark-tank environment that she begins to lose sight of that. So her clarity of vision starts to fade away."


    John Moore's 2015 video interview with 'FADE' playwright Tanya Saracho.

    3 Perspectives

    Hispanic vs. Latino: What’s in a name? There is a moment in FADE when those two terms are bandied about. And both generate controversy. “Hispanic is an official term. It’s the one that is used on the U.S. census,” said Ruiz. “But a lot of people don't like that term politically because the root of the word is 'Hispania,' and that goes back to colonial Hispanic roots. A lot of us who are here in the Americas are from a Mestizo lineage – that is a combination of indigenous people who were already here and the colonists who came from Spain. So it is very complicated for us to say, 'Oh, we are Hispanic,' like we are some offshoot of Spain. Many people really don't like to think of themselves that way.”

    When ‘Latino’ came along as a term, many preferred it to Hispanic because it reflects a cultural identity and a pride in being from the Americas, whether that mean South America or Mexico or Central America. “But Latino is such a huge umbrella term,” Ruiz said. “There are different nationalities, different customs and very different cultures within that term - so it's not like all Latinos are the same.”

    That’s part of what FADE is exploring, Ruiz added: "How these two people who identify as Latina or Latina come from completely different backgrounds and experiences."

    4 Perspectives Get me rewrite! FADE may become the textbook example of the DCPA’s new-play development program at work. The process starts more than a year before a developing work is introduced as a reading at the annual Colorado New Play Summit. And the work continues, in some cases, until Opening Night. “When Tanya arrived in Denver last year for the New Play Summit, she really had about the first 50 pages of the play done, so she had a whole ending section to figure out,” Ruiz said. “She did quite a bit of work while she was here, and then the Denver Center conducted a workshop in Los Angeles last summer. All during this time, Tanya was doing more work on it, and she continued to flesh it out. By the time we got here to Denver for rehearsals about a month ago, she had a very solid draft of the script. And now we are starting to make one last pass at rewrites.”

    Ruiz was speaking on Feb. 5, just before the first preview performance of FADE, and one week before the official opening on Friday (Feb. 12). About six new pages of dialogue were added that day, and the actors were off learning their new lines. What’s fascinating to learn is how rewrites can greatly impact other parts of the creative process. Even those thought done.

    “These new rewrites happen in the first few scenes of the play, and they really impact how we get to know the main character,” Ruiz said. “So when I was reading these new pages, the first thing I said was, ‘Well, we are going to have to get her some new clothes.' I went to the costume designer (Meghan Anderson Doyle) last night and I said, ‘Hey, guess what? We've got these new pages. And there is a whole different tone now. These costumes are not going to work.’ And bam, she went out shopping this morning, and now there are completely different costumes in the first half of the show. All of that happened today.”  

    That anecdote, Ruiz says, demonstrates how a new play “is very much a living organism that is evolving and changing and growing.”

    5 Perspectives Is FADE autobiographical? In part. Saracho is a writer on ABC’s How to Get Away With Murder, primarily to help transform the Mexican-born protagonist played by Karla Souza into a complicated and fully fleshed character. But her first job was writing for HBO’s Devious Maids. “Tanya is a very funny writer, but she has a serious sense of politics about Latino and Latina identity,” Ruiz said. “So I think her experience on Devious Maids was somewhat troubling. She was suddenly in a show that was probably perpetuating a lot of the stereotypes that she had spent her whole theatre career trying to combat or challenge. I think FADE very much came out of that space of feeling unsure of how to navigate the world of network television while feeling conflicted between what she had to do as a writer on the staff and her own personal artistic values."


    FADE in Denver

    Photos from the making of 'FADE' in Denver. To see the full gallery, click the forward button on the photo above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE: Ticket information
    tanya-saracho

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Through March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Previous NewsCenter coverage of FADE:
     

    FADE 600A question is posed at the latest Perspectives.
  • January 2016: Applause magazine puzzle solution

    by John Moore | Jan 21, 2016
    With each new issue of Applause Magazine, we offer readers a puzzle related to our current shows. Here is the most recent puzzle, covering The Nest, The Wizard of Oz, All the Way, A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder, FADE and Dirty Dancing – The Classic Story On Stage, along with the solution at the bottom. Print and play!

    Applause Crossword January 2016
  • 'FADE': You've never seen a woman like Lucia onstage before

    by John Moore | Jan 13, 2016
    FADE in Denver
    Photos from the first rehearsal of 'FADE' on Jan. 8. To see more photos, click the 'forward' arrow. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE is a new play written by a Mexican-born playwright who acknowledges the first tentative step many U.S. businesses take toward employment equality is the token diversity hire.

    FADE takes place in a Hollywood TV studio, where the lead character, Lucia, is out of her element. “This is a practice that has gone on - and is still going on - in the TV and film industries, as well as our own (theatre) industry," said DCPA Theatre Company Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson, "where many times a person - whether a writer, actor, director - is the token diverse person brought into a creative situation.”

    Jerry Ruiz QuoteBy focusing on a Latina TV writer and her friendship with a third-generation American Chicano who works as her custodian, “FADE really is a play that reveals the complexity that we all know exists within the Hispanic/Latino/Chicano community, but is rarely revealed on our main stages,” Thompson said at Monday’s first rehearsal for the DCPA Theatre Company’s world premiere that starts performances on Feb. 5. “You have two really interesting characters here who come from completely different backgrounds.”

    What’s also very different about FADE, director Jerry Ruiz says, is the storyteller. Playwright Tanya Saracho is native of Los Mochis, Mexico, and a Boston University alum who describes herself as “an Americanized, acculturated Mexican citizen with a green card.” Lucia is based somewhat on her experiences as a first-time TV writer.

    “There is no playwright on the American theatre scene that is doing what Tanya is doing,” Ruiz said. “Yes, she is very funny, and very provocative, but there are really serious ideas at the heart of all of her plays. She really tackles class distinctions and class differences within this nebulous Latino population that we always hear about. But she really sheds light on just how varied and diverse that set of people is.

    “I think she is an incredibly unique and important voice in the American theatre.”

    In the play, Lucia is an immigrant, but she is clearly a woman of means. Whereas the janitor, in a very not metaphorical way – cleans her trash. Lucia has been brought in to write specifically for the TV show’s token Latina TV character, because none of the white male writers have a clue what makes the character tick. And it turns out, the custodian may have a better understanding of that than Lucia does.

    “What I love about this play is that it is a story about privilege - and who has it; power - and who has it," Ruiz said. "That's really why this story is so ‘of our moment.’ This idea of who gets to tell this story, and how is it told? It's the story of appropriation. It's about how the experience of a working-class military man who is Mexican-American gets re-shaped."

    This is simply a character, the director said, theatre audiences have not seen onstage before.

    “Tanya writes such complex female characters,” Ruiz said. “I think Lucia has had a lot of privilege in her life. She probably comes from money. She is someone who has navigated the world. She has a good education, she looks a certain way. But she is powerless within the hierarchy of the television show. To me, the turning point in the play is when she suddenly realizes, ‘Oh my gosh, I have no power right now. That's what this terrible feeling is. They just see me as a translator - as one of “them.” ’ So then the question becomes - what is she willing to do?”

    Saracho believes it’s not important how she – or Lucia – found their way into the writers’ room. It’s more important that they earned their way into their next jobs. “I am grateful that they were aware enough to know that our voice was missing,” Saracho said. "In time, hopefully these (diversity) programs will be gone, because we will have redefined the mainstream - and we will not be 'otherized' this way.

    “I say just let us into the castle. We'll do something while we're in there.”


    'FADE' features Eddie Martinez and Mariana Fernández. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. 


    FADE: Ticket information
    tanya-saracho
  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Feb. 5-March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • In this  true-to-life new comedy, Mexican-American Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers with unexpected consequences. FADE is a standout new play from Tanya Saracho, whose writing “lands in that sweet spot between comedy and drama” (Chicago Tribune).
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Mariana Fernández of 'FADE.' Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.
  • Saracho on the color of TV: 'We look like the future'

    by John Moore | Jan 11, 2016

    Tanya Saracho
    From left: 'FADE' playwright Tanya Saracho, actors Eddie Martinez and Mariana Fernández, and director Jerry Ruiz.


    Writer Tanya Saracho works in a magical place called ShondaLand where there are unicorns literally running down the hallways.

    OK, maybe not so much unicorns … literally. But compared to the rest of a television landscape that remains dominated by white male writers, Saracho is living out a fantasy that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.

    how-to-get-away-with-murder-season-2Saracho, whose play FADE will begin performances in its world premiere staging at the Denver Center’s Ricketson Theatre on Feb. 5, is moonlighting as a staff writer on the hit ABC series How to Get Away with Murder (pictured right). 

    Veteran TV writer and playwright Theresa Rebeck, whose new play The Nest will debut on the stage right next to FADE, recently told the DCPA NewsCenter: “I am tired of (TV) being a boys club where I am the only woman around.”

    Saracho, on the other hand, is writing for a TV show with nine writers, five of whom are women, “and we're all of color,” she says. “So we’re the majority in that room. Everyone’s queer or of color or whatever and we look like … everything.

    “We look like the future.”

    Tanya Saracho quoteShondaLand is the name of the production company founded by African-American producer Shonda Rhimes (Grey's Anatomy, Scandal). But Saracho is the first to admit that ShondaLand is not Hollywoodland. Yet.

    “It’s different because this show has a female lead of color (Viola Davis) who is really problematic and complicated and beautiful and ugly at the same time,” said Saracho. “I feel you can only fully write that character if you have a shorthand in the writers’ room. Where if she does a little twist with her hair, then you already know that has social and cultural connotations.”

    Saracho previously wrote for HBO’s Looking and Girls. Her life changed when she wrote a full episode of Looking that aired last February. She realizes that more people saw that one episode of television than will likely see all of her stage plays combined over her lifetime.

    “I realized the power of TV when I wrote that episode,” she said. “I wrote this line that was something like, ‘White guys are the worst - they think they own everything.’ Well, that got people talking. All these memes showed up on social media, and I was like, ‘Wait a minute. I've been doing all this political theatre from the beginning of my career and no one has ever made a meme out of it.’ But it’s crazy the reach that television has.”

    Saracho sees positive change everywhere. Davis became the first black woman to win the Emmy for leading actress in a TV drama. On Sunday, Taraji Henson won the Golden Globe in that same category for Empire. “All these things are happening, and it’s exciting,” Saracho said.

    Such was not the case when Saracho started writing FADE, which was partly inspired by her experiences working her first TV job. She is the first to tell you she was an untrained quota hire.

    FADE is about a first-time TV writer named Lucia who doesn’t know what she is doing,” Saracho said. When Lucia discovers that the studio custodian, Abel, has a more credible understanding of the fictional star character she is supposed to be writing for than she does, she begins incorporating his insights into her scripts. Lucia’s professional stardom rises, but soon she must grapple with the possibility that she has become part of the problem she came to the studio to help solve. 

    Saracho’s play was featured at the last Colorado New Play Summit, when the story was still a developing idea. In the year since, she says, she has leaned more into the tougher consequences of her story – specifically the issue of betrayal.

    “I was kind of shying away from that and making excuses for her,” she said. "But then we did a workshop and now I feel like, yes, let this be an ugly act of true betrayal.”

    She is essentially forcing herself to do what she is challenging audiences to do – and that is to look again at our preconceptions and prejudices about immigration.

    “I've been obsessed with trapping class in my plays since the beginning, especially when it comes to a Mexican point of view,” said Saracho, who, like her fictional lead character, was born in Mexico and describes herself as “an Americanized, acculturated Mexican citizen with a green card.” When you consider that the lowly Abel is a third-generation Chicano, the culture clash between the two characters is bound to get necessarily messy.

    “I know that a lot of people in this country think of a Mexican immigrant in only one way,” Saracho said. “I like to flip that around. So here the woman has money and status and yet, she is the Mexican immigrant. And if you think the janitor looks and feels more like what you think an immigrant is, well, no: He’s a full-blooded American.

    “I would love for people to think about immigration in a more complicated way. Not so much the politics of it but more: Do you really understand your neighbor to the south? Do you really understand the class system and the pathways to getting here and staying here?”

    And when FADE opens and Saracho returns to ShondaLand, she will do so knowing that TV writer rooms still look a lot more like they do in FADE than they do at How to Get Away with Murder.

    “No, we can't say that it’s all better just because of this one room," she said. “The lack of agency and opportunity in television is real - and it is true.”


    FADE 
    tanya-saracho

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Feb. 5-March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • In this  true-to-life new comedy, Mexican-American Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers with unexpected consequences. FADE is a standout new play from Tanya Saracho, whose writing “lands in that sweet spot between comedy and drama” (Chicago Tribune).
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.
  • DCPA Theatre Company announces 2015-16 directors

    by John Moore | Jun 29, 2015
    Anthony Powell, who directed 'Lord of the Flies' last season, returns to helm 'All the Way' in 2016. Photo by John Moore.
    Anthony Powell, who directed "Lord of the Flies" last season, returns to helm "All the Way" in 2016. Photo by John Moore.


    The DCPA Theatre Company has announced its announces directors for the upcoming 2015-16 season:

    Lookingglass Alice

    In association with The Actors Gymnasium
    David CatlinSept. 11-Oct 11
    Adapted and Directed by David Catlin
    From the works of Lewis Carroll
    David Catlin is a founding ensemble member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company, the recipient of the 2011 Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre. He is a senior professor in the theatre department at Northwestern University. The goal at Lookingglass is to redefine the limits of theatrical experience and to make theatre exhilarating, inspirational, and accessible to all.

    As You Like It

    Sept. 25-Nov. 1
    Kent ThompsonDirected by Kent Thompson
    By William Shakespeare
    The Denver Center Producing Artistic Director takes on his seventh Shakespeare title since arriving in 2006. Previous titles include Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream and King Lear. This is the DCPA's first full staging of this comedy of romance that ends in four couples getting married.

    Tribes
    Oct. 9-Nov. 15
    Stephen Weitz (Instructor)Directed by Stephen Weitz
    By Nina Raine
    Weitz, founder of the award-winning Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, has both acted with the DCPA Theatre Company (King Lear, Richard III, Othello) and directed (Jackie & Me). Weitz earned an MA in Theatre from CU-Boulder and an MFA at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. Tribes poses a unique challenge in that it focuses on a fiercely intelligent and proudly politically incorrect family who argue a lot but don’t communicate with their grown deaf son.
     
    A Christmas Carol
    Bruce SevyNov. 27-Dec 27
    Directed by Bruce K. Sevy
    Written by Charles Dickens
    Adapted by Richard Hellesen
    Music by David de Berry
    With his ninth staging of the DCPA's popular holiday favorite, Associate Artistic Director Bruce K. Sevy will match Laird Williamson with 40 DCPA credits as the busiest director in company history.




    The Nest

    Adrienne Campbell-HoltJan. 22-Feb. 21, 2016
    Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt
    Written by Theresa Rebeck
    Adrienne Campbell-Holt is the Founding Artistic Director of Colt Coeur, a Brooklyn-based theatre company that has mounted five world-premieres in the past five years. This year, she will direct Laura Jacqmin’s Dental Society Midwinter Meeting for the Williamstown Theatre Festival, First Life at Colt Coeur and the world premiere of Theresa Rebeck’s The Nest for the DCPA. It's about a group of middle-class regulars at a small, struggling bar.

    All The Way
    Jan. 29-Feb 28, 2016
    Directed By Anthony Powell
    Anthony Powell. Written by Robert Schenkkan
     All the Way, the 2014 Tony Award-winner for best new play, marks the return of Anthony Powell, who last directed Lord of the Flies. His 32 previous DCPA credits include The Pillowman and Death of a Salesman. He is also Artistic Director of the venerable local company dedicated to storytelling, Stories on Stage. All the Way is Robert Schenkkan's (The 12) acclaimed look the LBJ presidency.



    FADE

    Jerry RuizFeb. 5-March 13, 2016
    Directed by Jerry Ruiz
    By Tanya Saracho
    Born in Brownsville, Texas, Ruiz is based in New York City with a portfolio largely focused on directing new plays. He directed the reading of FADE that was performed at the Colorado New Play Summit in February. His credits include Karen Zacarias' Mariela in the Desert for Repertorio Español. FADE is about a  one-book Mexican-American novelist named Lucia who is hired to write for a popular weekly TV serial.

    Sweeney Todd
    April 8-May 15, 2016
    Directed By Kent Thompson
    Written by Stephen Sondheim
    Based on an adaptation by Christopher Bond
    Thompson, whose 20 DCPA credits to date include two stagings of the Irvin Berlin musical White Christmas, turns his attention to this all-new look at Stephen Sondheim's  legendary demon barber of Fleet Street. Thompson will work with DeVotchKa, the Grammy-nominated, Denver hometown band that has been given the OK from Sondheim himself to infuse his classic score with DeVotchKa’s lush brand of gypsy punk.

    READ MORE ABOUT THE DCPA THEATRE COMPANY'S NEW SEASON HERE

    READ OUR EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NICK URATA OF DEVOTCHKA


    Tickets and subscriptions
    New and renewing subscribers have the first opportunity to reserve tickets. Tickets are presently available to subscribers, online here,  or by calling 303-893-6030 or 303-893-4100. Subscribers are guaranteed the best seats at the best prices, along with additional benefits. Single tickets will go on sale to the general public in late summer.
  • 'The Kilroys' and gender disparity: Righting a wrong ... right now

    by John Moore | Jun 23, 2015
    Tanya Saracho. Tanya Saracho.


    They call it a movement. And they call that movement "a parity raid."

    "The Kilroys" is a new annual survey that identifies new plays by women writers deemed most worthy of full production. The goal is to get more women's voices represented in the American Theatre. That's an issue close to the heart of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, where the Women's Voices Fund has raised more than $1 million to commission and produce new plays by women, as well as to employ female directors, here in Denver.

    How real is the problem? There have only been two Broadway plays written by women in the past two seasons combined. Only about 24 percent of all plays produced across the country this past season were written by a woman, living or dead.

    Nationally, producers have responded to the complaint by saying they do not get enough submissions from female writers.

    Enter "The List," which began as a conversation among 13 female playwrights over cocktails. The impact was immediate. According to The New York Times, of the 46 plays on the inaugural list, 28 have since been produced. The selected plays seemingly were read more frequently by theatre producers, and the playwrights were more sought after, as a result of The List.

    Now, the second annual list has just been released, and it includes Tanya Saracho's FADE, a DCPA Theatre Company commission that will have its world premiere in the Ricketson Theatre next Feb. 5. It will be one centerpiece of the DCPA's 2016 Colorado New Play Summit.

    Alejandra Escalante and Eddie Martinez in 'Fade.' Photo by John Moore. Gender disparity was a hot topic at the 2015 Summit in February, when Theresa Rebeck told the DCPA NewsCenter: "Women have been shut out of the storytelling of the American culture on such a profound level for so long – in theatre, in film, and in TV – why wouldn’t we be angry?"

    Rebeck's The Nest will have its world premiere next year in Denver alongside Saracho's FADE, the story of a one-time Mexican-American novelist who is hired to write for a popular weekly TV serial and finds herself out of her depth. It's based on Saracho's own experiences writing for TV.

    "Listen: I got into television because I was a diversity hire,' Saracho said bluntly. "I don't care why I got in there. I just needed an in, because we need to be in there."


    This interview with Tanya Saracho was filmed at the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit. Saracho's "FADE" was a featured reading, and later was chosen for full production on the DCPA Theatre Company's 2015-16 season. Video by John Moore.


    Saracho is one of The Kilroys' 13 founders. She says "The List" happened pretty organically.

    "A few of us gathered socially, and the conversation turned to gender disparity in the theatre," Saracho told the DCPA NewsCenter. "Someone said, 'We should do something,' but no one knew what 'something' was at first. Then, 13 of us started meeting regularly. Plans and sub-plans were formed. Before we knew what we really were, we were in action."

    One of the first big initiatives was the creation of The List. Organizers surveyed 321 influential new-play leaders — including artistic directors, literary managers, professors, producers, directors and dramaturgs — who had read or seen at least 40 new plays in the past year. The team of 321 nominators identified more than 750 plays by more than 200 female or trans-gendered playwrights written in the past year. From those nominees, the official list of 53 was chosen.

    "It was simple but monumental, and I think it's made the right kinds of waves in the field," Saracho said. "It's affecting change that is tangible in many ways. It's serving to hang a lantern in a new kind of way to this ages-old problem of inequality on the American stage."

    Asked about the nominating team's decision to include her own play on The List, Saracho said: "This is such a tough industry, that gives you comfort to know you have advocates championing your work behind the curtain, you know?"

    For more about the selection process, click here.

    Anyone interested in nominating a new play for consideration on next year's list is encouraged to email thekilroys13@gmail.com.

    To read The List, click here.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist, where he is the editor of a new media outlet that covers the Colorado theatre community.

    More about Tanya Saracho
    Tanya Saracho was born in Sinaloa, México and is a playwright who writes for television. Currently she writes for HBO's  "Looking." Other shows have included Girls and Devious Maids. Plays produced at: 2nd Stage, Steppenwolf Theatre, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, The Goodman Theater,  Teatro Vista, Teatro Luna, Fountain Theater, Clubbed Thumb, NEXT Theater and 16th Street Theater. Plays include: Hushabye; The Tenth Muse; Song for the Disappeared; EnfrascadaEl Nogalar (inspired by The Cherry Orchard); an musical adaptation of The House on Mango StreetOur Lady of the Underpass ; Kita y Fernanda, and Quita Mitos. Currently in development with/commissioned by:  HBO, Goodman Theater, Steppenwolf Theatre, Two Rivers Theatre, DCPA Theatre Company, and South Coast Rep.

    About Denver's And Toto Too Theatre Company
    Guest columnist Susan Lyles on Denver's only theatre company dedicated to telling women's stories.


  • Theatre Company introduces bold new artwork for 2015-16 season

    by John Moore | Jun 01, 2015
    Kyle Malone season art 2015-16.

    Kyle Malone's artwork for the upcoming 2015-16 DCPA Theatre Company season. "A Christmas Carol" is still to come. Photo below by John Moore.


    Kyle Malone. Photo by John Moore.


    Art Director Kyle Malone, a 15-year employee of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, isn’t an actor. Nonetheless, he has had a profound influence on how audiences have experienced every DCPA Theatre Company production since 2013.

    That’s when Theatre Company Director of Marketing Brianna Firestone awarded Malone the prestigious - and high-stakes - assignment of creating the art campaign that serves as theatregoers’ first exposure to the look, feel and content of the Theatre Company’s entire season.

    Malone’s award-winning design work was singled out by The New York Times in December, but the DCPA has recently undergone a massive rebranding that has created a whole new look and feel for the organization. And the Theatre Company’s 2015-16 season art would have to reflect that.

    After an extensive exploration of design direction and discussions with local artists, Firestone and new DCPA Creative Director Rob Silk decided Malone was still the best artist for the job.

    But Malone would be challenged to create a campaign unlike anything he has ever done before. He was asked to capture the raw emotion that will embody the upcoming season of Lookingglass Alice, As You Like It, Tribes, A Christmas Carol, All The Way, world-premiere new plays The Nest and FADE, finishing with the musical Sweeney Todd, featuring new orchestrations by the Denver band DeVotchKa.

    “We have a new brand, and so we very intentionally wanted a departure,” said Malone, a native of Arvada. He and Silk considered several new mediums including photography, “light-painting” and even layered light boxes.

    The guiding principle?

    “Rob really wanted to see the artists’ hand in this,” Malone said, “not something that looked like it was created on a computer.”

    They ultimately chose a layered illustration style that would include what Malone calls “a toolbox of different elements.” That starts with the lettering, or what is known in the trade as a “title treatment.”

    'All the Way' title treatments.Malone’s illustration for All the Way, a Tony-winning about President Lyndon Baines Johnson, features red, white and blue coloring, and a lettering style that evokes a political campaign. (The illustration to the right shows several possible iterations created by Malone. The bottom choice ended up being the winner.)

    The contemporary play Tribes, which focuses on hard-of-hearing characters, has a modern lettering style, accented by multi-colored hands that jut out of the letters to cleverly spell the name of the play in American Sign Language. The Sweeney Todd lettering, meanwhile, looks more appropriately classic – complemented by a subtle slash through the letters. 

    The second key element of each illustration is a pencil-and-ink drawing of a character who is central to each title. For Sweeney Todd, of course, that meant a slightly crazed, razor-wielding Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Malone calls this the “Hero Element.”

    “The look is scribbled, emotional, raw, high contrast and character based,” Malone said. Each drawing is done by hand, in black and white. And a signature element, Malone said, “is that they all splatter.”

    The Tribes hero element is particularly compelling as the hero is shown with hands covering his mouth, suggesting silence.

    The third element consists of colorful, computer-generated background images that introduce layering to the series. For example, a pronounced blood splatter covers our maniacal Sweeney Todd. But if you look closer, you will see musical instruments forming out of the blood drops. There is a dangling guitar, a trumpet and sousaphone – a sly nod to some DeVotchKa’s signature musical instruments.

    “The splatter helps keep it more raw,” Malone said. “If we polish up them too much, they might seem uptight. They also give each drawing some energy and flow.”

    Finally, each illustration includes a tagline that both brings continuity to the series and gives the reader a tantalizing idea of what kind of experience they are in for at the theatre. These are subject to change, but for Tribes, you might see the tagline, “TRUE FAMILY SPEAKS YOUR LANGUAGE." Or, for All the Way: “IT’S NOT PERSONAL. IT’S JUST POLITICS.”

    “These taglines tell the story in a quick and clever way,” Malone said. “Each one stands on its own, but with enough consistency in tone to be a unifier.”

    Sweeney 800Malone’s series (which remains subject to further alterations), might be seen by potential audiences in a variety of mediums, including: The Denver Center web site, on mobile devices, in TV and print advertising, on signage and banners throughout the city, on individual show programs and all over social media platforms.

    No pressure.

    For his campaign to be considered ultimately successful, Malone said, it will have to be seen as a unified series the audience will immediately identify as promoting plays and musicals by the DCPA Theatre Company. It will have to draw the reader in and help quickly forge an emotional connection to each show. And that it comes across as accessible across all potential audiences and not turn anyone off.

    “There is always that stereotype some people hold that says theatre is only for the sophisticated,” Malone said. “But we think theatre should be fun. So these illustrations should convey the flavor of each show so that comedies appear fun, and so that even while dramas celebrate drama, they do it in an appealing way.”


    How Kyle Malone's season art has eveolved over the past three seasons.

    How Kyle Malone's season art has evolved over the past three seasons.

  • DCPA Theatre Company giddily going down rabbit hole in 2015-16

    by John Moore | Mar 13, 2015
    Lookingglass Alice"Lookingglass Alice" as presented in Chicago.


    The DCPA Theatre Company’s 37th season will mark a groundbreaking musical collaboration with a beloved local rock band, and a much-requested return to Shakespeare. And not just any Shakespeare: It’s a title the Theatre Company has never performed in its history (As You Like It).

    DeVotchKaFor the fourth straight year, the season will end with a massive musical undertaking. Not only will the Theatre Company stage Stephen Sondheim’s epic masterpiece Sweeney Todd, the DCPA has received permission from the author to allow the Denver band DeVotchKa to adapt the score for what promises to be a cutting-edge new interpretation.

    "When we heard what show we are talking about, we definitely wanted to be a part of it," said DeVotchKa frontman Nick Urata, whose music is described as "mariachi gypsy punk."

    "We’ve just been dancing around the issue for the past couple of months trying to clear out our schedules, and so it only became a reality in the last couple of days. It's all pretty fresh."

    The Theatre Company's new slate affords another usual collaboration, this one with Chicago’s Lookingglass Theatre. Somewhat in the vein of Traces’ visit in 2011, Lookingglass debuted as a company with its magical reimagining of Alice in Wonderland that employed trapeze and other circus aerial effects. Lookingglass has toured this signature work ever since, but the production in Denver will a completely new staging performed on a completely reconfigured Stage Theatre.

    Kent Thompson. Photo by John Moore. The season lineup also reinforces the DCPA’s commitment to both new plays and women’s playwrights with the selection of two world-premiere comedies by women – both commissioned by the Theatre Company and featured in last month’s Colorado New Play Summit: Theresa Rebeck’s The Nest and Tanya Saracho’s FADE.

    And for the second straight season, the Theatre Company has slotted the most recent Tony Award-winning best play: The LBJ play All the Way. Before this year’s staging of Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, the Theatre Company had not presented a Tony-winning best new play since Doubt in 2008 - and has only staged three since 2000.

    “This coming season, we will challenge the boundaries in our theatrical spaces like never before to create incredible experiences for our patrons,” said Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson. “It will be a creative, emotionally charged and exhilarating eight months.”

    For the second straight season, the Theatre Company has announced an eight-show season. That’s down from 10 in 2013-14. Last year, Thompson explained that the company was responding to financial considerations, artistic sustainability and audience feedback.

    READ JOHN MOORE'S EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NICK URATA OF DEVOTCHKA

    THE 2015-16 SEASON AT A GLANCE
    :
    Sept. 11-Oct 11: Lookingglass Theatre Company’s Lookingglass Alice, Stage Theatre
    Sept. 25-Nov 1: As You Like It, Space Theatre
    Oct. 9-Nov. 15: Tribes, Ricketson Theatre
    Nov. 27-Dec 27: A Christmas Carol, Stage Theatre
    Jan. 22-Feb. 21, 2016: The Nest, Space Theatre
    Jan. 29-Feb 28, 2016: All The Way, Stage Theatre
    Feb. 5-March 13, 206: FADE, Ricketson Theatre
    April 8-May 15, 2016: Sweeney Todd, Stage Theatre

    THE PLAYS IN GREATER DETAIL:




    Lookingglass Theatre Company’s Lookingglass Alice

    Sept. 11-Oct 11
    Stage Theatre
    Adapted and Directed by David Catlin from the works of Lewis Carroll
    Produced in association with The Actors Gymnasium, Lookingglass Alice is a gravity-defying hit inspired by Lewis Carroll’s beloved stories. Called “Spectacular” and “pure, unadulterated magic” by the Chicago Sun-Times, Lookingglass Alice transports audiences to a circus-infused playground. It promises “breathtaking theatricality and wildly inventive acrobatics.”

    Says Kent Thompson: “We are extremely excited to kick off our season by bringing the unique magic of Chicago’s Lookingglass Alice to Denver. This is a wildly inventive production that allows audiences of all ages to join Alice as she literally tumbles down the rabbit hole. And one of the very important things is we will be completely re-staging The Stage theatre for this production because there will be about 175 seats onstage looking through back performance area. We think it will be very popular with families, multi-generationals and theatre people.”

    As You Like It
    Sept. 25-Nov. 1
    Space Theatre
    By William Shakespeare
    After falling under each other’s spell, the lovers Orlando and Rosalind are separately banished and become entangled in a beguiling game of mistaken identity when Rosalind disguises herself as a young man. Merry mischief, curiosity, and surprise flourish in one of Shakespeare’s richest and most popular comedies.

    Kent Thompson: “I’m thrilled to bring Shakespeare back to the Theatre Company with one of the Bard’s most famous comedies. This is a piece I’ve had the pleasure of directing several times and that I’m continuously drawn back to. Rosalind is hands-down one of the most intelligent and appealing female roles in all of Shakespeare. As You Like It has four couples that get married at the end. We are sure that not all four will last, but they represent all forms of love, from love at first sight to love seen through the eyes of lust."

    Tribes
    Oct. 9-Nov. 15
    Ricketson Theatre
    By Nina Raine
    In this drama, called “the best-written, deepest, most daring – and funniest – new play in recent years” by The Wall Street Journal, the members of Billy’s fiercely intelligent and proudly politically incorrect family share private languages, inside jokes and fiery arguments. But meeting Sylvia causes Billy, deaf since birth, to question what it means to be understood. Tribes dissects the possibilities of belonging, family and language.

    Kent Thompson: “I was very drawn to Nina Raine’s writing. This is a really dark and almost surreal, sometimes absurdist story about a dysfunctional family who are incredibly literate and verbal. I think for an American audience, it will seem like they are vicious – and sometimes they are. They have raised their adult son as if he were hearing, and he’s become involved with a woman who is now losing her hearing. Having a central character who is deaf allows us to examine how we communicate, and how we don’t. I know that our multimedia team is ready to dive right in to the challenging production elements of this piece.”



    A Christmas Carol

    Nov. 27-Dec 27
    Stage Theatre
    By Charles Dickens
    Adapted by Richard Hellesen
    Music by David de Berry
    Returning for a 23rd staging, A Christmas Carol this opulent seasonal tradition traces Ebenezer Scrooge’s triumphant journey to redemption. A Christmas Carol illuminates the meaning of the holiday season in a way that has resonated for generations. (This staging is an added attraction and is not included in the subscription season package).

    Kent Thompson: “This version of A Christmas Carol has everything. It’s full of humor, scariness, drama, spectacle and music. Most important, this version allows us to follow the full transformation of Ebenezer Scrooge and perhaps see a little of the change that happens in our own hearts.”


    Note: The footage above is from rehearsal for the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit. The full production is not yet cast.

    The Nest
    Jan. 22-Feb. 21, 2016
    Space Theatre
    By Theresa Rebeck
    The middle-class regulars at a struggling bar called The Nest talk about everything you can imagine: Race, ethnicity, cultures and work struggles. No conversation is off-limits ... until a woman walks in and offers a large sum for the beautiful antique bar. With its feisty humor and scorching dialogue, this new battle of the sexes holds a cracked mirror up to friendships, romantic relationships and families. This world premiere is a DCPA commission.

    Kent Thompson: “Theresa Rebeck has created a comedy that is both hilarious and acerbic. I can honestly say The Nest contains the best first scene of a play that I’ve read in 20 years. She is undeniably one of the more foremost female playwrights in the country, and we are excited to bring this commission to a fully staged premiere.”


    Note: The footage above is from the Broadway production of "All the Way." The DCPA production is not yet cast.

    All The Way

    Jan. 29-Feb 28, 2016
    Stage Theatre
    By Robert Schenkkan
    All The Way
    , a “jaw-dropping political drama,” according to Variety, portrays Lyndon Baines Johnson as one of the most controversial, ambitious and ruthless figures of the 20th century. Set in the pivotal year between JFK’s assassination and Johnson’s election, LBJ hurls himself at the Civil Rights Act, determined to rebuild the country into "The Great Society" by any means necessary. Written by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan (The 12, The Kentucky Cycle), All The Way won the 2014 Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critics’ Circle awards for best new play.

    Kent Thompson: “The story is centered in an incredible period of tragedy and change in American history that is still relevant today. We are excited to again feature Robert Schenkkan’s incredible work, and are honored to count him among our Denver Center commissioned playwrights.”

    Note: The footage above is from rehearsal for the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit. The full production is not yet cast.

    FADE
    Feb. 5-March 13, 2016
    Ricketson Theatre
    By Tanya Saracho
    In this sharp, world-premiere comedy, a one-time Mexican-American novelist named Lucia is hired to write for a popular weekly TV serial that features a Latina character. Lucia is out of her league but, as her friendship with the Latino studio custodian grows, she begins incorporating his very real stories into her scripts - and discovers a fast track to success with her bosses. But her choices come with personal consequences. This play is a Denver Center commission.

    Kent Thompson: “Tanya Saracho is a funny, gifted, rising writer who is intensely aware of the layers and complexities in the Hispanic culture. FADE uses humor and some of Tanya’s own life experience as a writer in Hollywood to examine our assumptions about each other, and to reveal some of the fissures within the Latino community. At the same time: This is a really funny play.”




    Sweeney Todd
    April 8-May 15, 2016
    Stage Theatre
    By Stephen Sondheim
    Based on an adaptation by Christopher Bond
    Musical adaptations by DeVotchKa
    DeVotchKa, the Grammy-nominated, Denver hometown music heroes, take on the legendary demon barber of Fleet Street, serving up a delicious reinvention of Sondheim’s magnificent musical thriller. Hell-bent on revenge, Sweeney Todd takes up with his enterprising neighbor in a devilish plot to slice their way through London’s upper crust. Justice will be served — along with audacious humor, bloody good thrills, and DeVotchKa’s lush brand of gypsy punk. Not only will DeVotchKa orchestrate this new version, members of the band will be among the live orchestra each night.

    Kent Thompson: “Sweeney Todd is one of the great musical theatre pieces of all time. With Sondheim’s blessing, we’re thrilled to partner with Denver favorite DeVotchKa to create a new orchestral backdrop for this epic villain.”

    READ JOHN MOORE'S EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NICK URATA OF DEVOTCHKA

    Tickets and subscriptions
    New and renewing subscribers have the first opportunity to reserve tickets. Tickets are available to subscribers beginning Monday, March 16, online here,  or by calling 303-893-6030 or 303-893-4100. Subscribers are guaranteed the best seats at the best prices, guaranteed, along with additional benefits. Single tickets will go on sale to the general public in late summer.

  • 2015 Summit Spotlight video: Tanya Saracho's ‘Fade'

    by John Moore | Feb 21, 2015


    Fade, by Tanya Saracho, is about Mexican-born Lucia, who is hired as a novice to write for a Latina character on an L.A.-based TV series. The play is based on Saracho's own experiences writing for the TV shows Devious Maids, Girls and Looking. "Listen: I got into television because I was a diversity hire,' she says bluntly. "I don't care why I got in there. I just needed an in, because we need to be in there."

    In Fade, the  character of Lucia soon discovers that the film studio's Chicano studio custodian has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows and she begins incorporating his insights into her scripts, Lucia’s professional stardom starts to rise, but her personal life only becomes more and more compromised. The cast includes Alejandra Escalante, Eddie Martinez and Amy Luna. The director is Jerry Ruiz.

    Of working at the DCPA on this featured Colorado New Play Summit reading, Saracho adds: "The support of everyone is really amazing because they are just trying to get your play born. So it's like everyone is a midwife." 

    Video by John Moore and David Lenk.

    For all of our Summit coverage, click here to go to our NewsCenter.

    THE SUMMIT SPOTLIGHT VIDEO SERIES: (to date):
    Part 1: The Nest, by Theresa Rebeck
    Part 2: The There There, by Jason Gray Platt
    Part 3: Holy Laughter, by Catherine Trieschmann
    Part 4: Fade, by Tanya Saracho (today)

    MORE COVERAGE FROM THE 2015 COLORADO NEW PLAY SUMMIT:

    Photos: Week 1 of the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit
    Matthew Lopez's 2015 Summit Soliloquy video
    Primer: Your guide to the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit
    Summit cast lists: Familiar names and new names
    Playwrights named for inaugural Local Playwrights Slam
    2015 Summit to introduce inaugural Local Playwrights Slam
    Colorado New Play Summit expands to two weekends; playwrights announced

    Alejandra Escalante and Eddie Martinez in 'Fade.' Photo by John Moore. Alejandra Escalante and Eddie Martinez in 'Fade' rehearsal. Photo by John Moore.

  • Photos: Week 1 of the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit

    by John Moore | Feb 15, 2015




    Our comprehensive photo gallery spans the first-day meet-and-greet, rehearsals for all four shows, the first-ever Local Playwrights Slam, and both acting and playwriting workshops conducted by DCPA Playwriting Fellow Matthew Lopez.

    Check back next week for more photos and video from each of the readings, and a full recap of Summit activities. All photos by John Moore and Kyle Malone.

    Local Playwrights Slam at the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit. Photo by John Moore.

    Nina Miller, Leslie C. Lewis and Jeffrey Neuman, curators of the first Local Playwrights Slam at the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit. Photo by John Moore.



    Previous NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit:
    Colorado New Play Summit expands to two weekends; playwrights announced
    Primer: Your guide to the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit
    Summit cast lists: Familiar names and new names
    Playwrights named for inaugural Local Playwrights Slam
    2015 Summit to introduce inaugural Local Playwrights Slam


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    ABOUT THE EDITOR
    John Moore
    John Moore
    Award-winning arts journalist John Moore has recently taken a groundbreaking new position as the DCPA’s Senior Arts Journalist. With The Denver Post, he was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the US by American Theatre Magazine. He is the founder of the Denver Actors Fund, a nonprofit that raises money for local artists in medical need. John is a native of Arvada and attended Regis Jesuit High School and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Follow him on Twitter @moorejohn.

    DCPA is the nation’s largest not-for-profit theatre organization dedicated to creating unforgettable shared experiences through beloved Broadway musicals, world-class plays, educational programs and inspired events. We think of theatre as a spark of life — a special occasion that’s exciting, powerful and fun. Join us today and we promise an experience you won't soon forget.