• 2017 True West Awards: Steven J. Burge and Jeremy Rill

    by John Moore | Dec 30, 2017
    2017 True West Awards The Breakouts  Jeremy Rill Steven J. Burge

    2017 TRUE WEST AWARDS  

    Day 30: The Breakouts

    Steven J. Burge and Jeremy Rill


    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    Steven J. Burge and Jeremy Rill are very different performers. Think Sean Hayes and Frank Sinatra. Burge will shock you into gut-busting laughter, while Rill will make you swoon. If Burge is the flamboyant life of the party, then Rill is more, say … sunset on the beach.

    “If there is a spectrum,” said director and actor Robert Michael Sanders, "those two are on the opposite ends of it.”

    The comedian and the crooner.

    Steven J Burge and Jeremy Rill But these two emerging actors have far more in common than you might think. Both had big-time breakout years on Denver stages in 2017 — and both were separately described as “the nicest guy in Denver theatre” in interviews for this very story.

    Something's gotta give.

    Steven Cole Hughes, Burge’s castmate in the Denver Center’s extended hit comedy An Act of God, goes so far as to declare with dead-on eye contact that “Steven Burge is the nicest guy working in the American theatre today. Period.”

    Even Hughes’ 2-year-old daughter, Birdie, backed her father up.

    “Hey Birdie, who is this?” Hughes said, pointing to a poster for An Act of God. The child’s face immediately lit up. She pointed to a photo of Burge playing no less than God Himself, and she declared enthusiastically: “Steven!”

    “She’s 2,” Hughes reiterated. “Even the 2-year-olds love Steve Burge.”

    That’s high praise (or short praise, come to think of it) for Burge, who has been working his way up to this moment with one joyful performance after another since moving from Iowa in 2003, most often in extroverted comic roles. Highlights have included playing Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors and conquering the epic challenge of playing 40 roles in the one-man comedy Fully Committed. In 2012, Westword’s Juliet Wittman flatly declared, “Steve Burge is one of the funniest actors anywhere.”

    Says his friend and fellow actor Shannan Steele: “I love watching him delight in making others happy.”

    But Burge’s body of work has revealed far greater range and uncommon emotional honesty in stagings such as Dog Sees God at The Avenue Theater (I called him "triumphant" in The Denver Post) and Curious Theatre’s Speech and Debate. No matter how big the character Burge is called upon to play, “you always know there's a real and very interesting person underneath," Wittman wrote.

    (Story continues after the photo.)

    Steven J. Burge United in Love Photo by John Moore
    Steven J. Burge co-hosted the 'United in Love' benefit concert with Eden Lane that raised $40,000 for The Denver Actors Fund.  Photo by John Moore.


    But Burge’s steady career trajectory took a turn for the skyward late last year when he was hired by Director Geoffrey Kent to be the understudy for An Act of God, a pointed social comedy in which God comes down to Earth in human form to set the record straight about the misguided ways in which we sometimes act in God’s name. When Broadway and TV star Wesley Taylor’s contract expired, the Denver Center did not seek out a similarly big-named national replacement. It already had Burge, who smoothly ascended to Almighty status for what turned into an extended run at the Galleria Theatre. The role called on all of Burge’s comic skills, as well as his uncommon gift to make people listen and laugh, even when they might not like what he is telling them. Burge had An Act of God audiences eating out of his holy goblet.

    To say that Burge made an impression in his Denver Center debut would be an understatement.

    “Steven has spot-on comic timing, a fantastic voice and the best rehearsal attitude and esprit de corps I know of,” said Kent. “He improves the quality of everything he touches.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    A few months later, Director Ray Roderick punched Burge's ticket for an immediate return trip to the Galleria Theatre in the musical comedy First Date. Gigs at the Galleria are considered jackpot jobs among local actors because they generally come with a minimum six-month contract.

    Burge plays many characters in First Date, most notably the quintessential gay best friend of a young woman who’s just starting to brave the dating pool. The reason Burge succeeds at taking such a stock character and making him meaningfully connect with an audience, says Steele, is his willingness to bring his authentic self to all his roles.

    “The thing you need to know about Steven is that just beneath his hilarious and charming exterior is a beautifully tender, vulnerable, compassionate and generous person,” she said.

    “Steven is the opposite of an old soul. He is brand new to his world ... and his childlike wonder and joy are palpable.”

    800 Red Hot and Cole Cherry Creek Theatre Jeremy Rill Phot by Olga LopezHe’s now being rewarded for paying his many dues, and everyone agrees — it could not be happening to a nicer guy. For years, Burge has been known for saying yes to anyone who asks for his time and talents. This year, he co-hosted a benefit concert at the Lone Tree Arts Center that netted $40,000 for the Denver Actors Fund, and Miscast 2017 at the Town Hall Arts Center, which raised $7,000 more. He also has kept the Colorado Theatre Guild’s Henry Awards buzzing along since 2012 with his unpredictable comic energy as co-host with GerRee Hinshaw.

    "To me, Burge encapsulates the heart and soul of the Denver theatre community,” Kent said. “He volunteers for almost every arts organization I can list. If Denver were to elect a ‘Theatre Ambassador,’ he would have my vote.”

    Also receiving votes for Nicest Guy in Denver Theatre would be Jeremy Rill, an Arkansas native who already was a big deal in the lofty Chicago theatre scene when he moved to Colorado for love. And it didn’t take long for people to notice.

    “It's that voice,” said his frequent director, Kelly Van Oosbree. “The richness and his absolute control of it is remarkable. The first time I heard Jeremy open his mouth, I said, ‘This guy is going to be big.’ You just can’t deny that voice.”

    Coming Sunday: 2017 Colorado Theatre Person of the Year

    The Performance Now Theatre Company in Lakewood was the first Colorado company to catch wise, casting Rill in the regional premiere of Jane Eyre (Edward Rochester), Guys and Dolls (Sky Masterson) and Ragtime (Younger Brother). By then it was becoming pretty obvious to anyone within earshot that Rill was going to be a man in demand this year.

    Jeremy Rill Miscast Photo by John MooreA lot more people know “that voice” after it opened up and sang for the first time on four different metro stages this year. Rill started out playing no less than Cole Porter himself in the Cherry Creek Theatre Company’s Red, Hot and Cole at the Mizel Arts and Culture Center, landing quite cozily among a star-filled cast that included Steele alongside local big-shots Seth Dhonau and Lauren Shealy (both now co-starring with Burge in First Date), Damon Guerasio, Stephen Day, Matt LaFontaine, Sharon Kay White and several others.

    Rill then earned karma points for life when he was asked to join the ensemble of the Arvada Center’s Jesus Christ Superstar after the actor playing Judas had to leave the show for medical reasons. That set off casting dominoes that ended with Rill stepping onto one of the biggest theatre stages in the state a mere four hours before the first performance in front of an audience.

    There’s a reason Arvada Center director Rod Lansberry turned to Rill, whom he had never before cast, when the chips were down, Van Oosbree said. It’s that Sinatra cool.

    “If someone ever asked me to do something like that, I would have said, ‘No, thanks,’ ” Van Oosbree said. “But Rod knew Jeremy could handle the pressure. And he did.”

    That may be one reason karma has smiled back on Rill, who will return to Performance Now to play Cinderella’s prince in Into the Woods opening Jan. 5 at the Lakewood Cultural Center. He then joins the cast of the Arvada Center’s Sunday in the Park with George — and on the first day of rehearsal this time. Rill will play Louis, fiancé of the model who attracts the eye of an artist based on Georges Seurat.

    Superstar led to the 2017 performance that will put Rill on every director’s radar – and wish list — for years to come. Van Oosbree tapped Rill to head another dauntingly loaded ensemble in Stephen Sondheim’s Company for the Aurora Fox that included Shealy, Heather Lacy, Lindsey Falduto, Carolyn Lohr, Rebekah Ortiz, Heather Doris and many others.

    (Story continues below the video.)


    Video bonus: Jeremy Rill performs 'Everybody's Girl' at Miscast 2017:




    You knew going in that Rill would bring any production of Company to a thunderous finish with his take on the forceful ballad “Being Alive.” But what separates a good Company from a great one is an actor who understands that Bobby’s journey is a serious rumination on the relative pros and cons of choosing a married or solitary life. Rill allowed himself to get fully lost in his journey — which at times meant going inside and checking out from the Aurora Fox audience altogether.

    Turns out, as Van Oosbree plainly puts it: Jeremy Rill is not just another pretty voice.

    “He’s also a really good actor,” she said. “He found the vulnerable in Bobby and the underlying pain that I think sometimes goes missing in other performances. The easy thing would be to make Bobby a fun, jovial bachelor, but that’s just not who this man is. Jeremy was clever and he was sexy and he was charming and he was cynical and he was sad. He was all the things. He just killed it.”

    Wrote Ramsey Scott for the Aurora Sentinel: “Jeremy Rill nails the mix of aloofness and emotional despair that plagues his character throughout the show and matches it with a voice that deserves to be the center of attention.”  Added Wittman for Westword: "Jeremy Rill has a richly melodious and supple voice that’s sheer pleasure to listen to."

    Norell Moore by Jeremy RillAnd Rill’s artistry, by the way, is not limited to the stage. He’s also a disarmingly effective portrait photographer who is known for bringing out an astonishing clarity of character in a single frame. Look no further than his revealing portrait of fellow actor Norrell Moore (right) soon after she started chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    “I mean this as no disrespect to any other photographer,” said Sanders. “But if you put 100 random actor headshots in a pile in front of me, I could easily pick out the ones taken by Jeremy because he has such a distinctive style behind the camera. He just has a way of making actors look their best. Maybe it’s because he’s one of them. But somehow he manages to put a sparkle in the eye of every single person he photographs.”

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S. by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist 

    Steven J. Burge: 2017
    • The Almighty in DCPA Cabaret’s First Date
    • Co-Host, United in Love benefit concert
    • Co-Host, Colorado Theatre Guild Henry Awards
    • Co-Host, Miscast 2017
    • Multiple roles in DCPA Cabaret’s First Date

    Jeremy Rill: 2017
    • Man 1 (Cole Porter) in Cherry Creek Theatre’s Red, Hot and Cole
    • Ensemble in Arvada Center’s Jesus Christ Superstar
    • Aurora Fox’s Company
    • Emile de Becque in Platte Valley Players' South Pacific (concert version)
    • Performed in Miscast 2017 for the Denver Actors Fund

    Steven J Burge GerRee Hinshaw 2017 Henry Awards BLF Photography
    Steven J. Burge and GerRee Hinshaw co-hosting the 2017 Henry Awards. BLF Photography.


    About The True West Awards: '30 Days, 30 Bouquets'

    The True West Awards, now in their 17th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2017 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore's daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    A look back at the history of the True West Awards

    The 2017 True West Awards (to date)

     

  • 2017 True West Award: Maegan Burnell

    by John Moore | Dec 14, 2017
    2017 True West Award Meagan Burnell Arvada Center

    2017 TRUE WEST AWARDS  

    Day 14: Maegan Burnell

    Arvada Center Stage Manager

    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    Maegan Burnell moved to Colorado to become a stage manager and fell in love with a stage manager and is soon moving to Chicago so they can both be stage managers together.

    We're talking a two-logistician family.

    “If those two ever have a kid,” Director Robert Michael Sanders said of Burnell and Jonathan D. Allsup, “he’ll be born with head-sets on and holding a spreadsheet.”  

    Today’s True West Award is a parting shot. Because Burnell is moving true east. And the Arvada Center’s Lynne Collins, for one, is “desperately sad we are losing her."

    Stage managers are the chief practitioners of what are often called the invisible arts. They are highly organized, detail-oriented, no-nonsense train conductors who are inordinately calm in the midst of chaos. And if they are doing their jobs well — you in the audience will never know they even exist.  

    “Stage managers are the unsung heroes of what we do,” said Collins, who was hired as the Arvada Center’s Artistic Director of Plays in 2016 to create a company of recurring actors to perform a four-play repertory season. It was Collins’ job to run that operation. It was Burnell’s job to help build that operation from scratch.

    “The logistics of stage-managing a repertory company are enormous,” Collins said. “In our case, it means you are running three productions at the same time. It means managing overlapping actor calendars. It means keeping track of hours and rehearsal spaces."

    A stage manager’s job description can vary from theatre to theatre and show to show. Typically, they provide practical and organizational support to the director, actors, designers, stage crew and technicians throughout the production process. And after the opening performance, when it’s time for the director to move on, the stage manager becomes the law by running the show and standing in for the director in all matters.

    And Burnell, Collins said, “is phenomenal at all of that. She is calm and cool and collected and organized and compassionate and utterly without drama.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    Burnell was a grad student when she was hired in 2012 as an assistant stage manager by the acclaimed Creede Repertory Theatre, which presents up to seven productions each summer in the San Juan Mountains about 250 miles southwest of Denver. Her boss was Allsup, who is now the cause of all the distress running throughout the Colorado theatre community because he’s the one she will be starting a life with in Chicago after the Arvada Center’s second rep season ends in May with All My Sons.

    Burnell, originally from Waterford, Mich., graduated from Central Michigan University and the University of Missouri-Kansas City's graduate program before answering the call from Creede. She was lured to Denver in 2014 to become the permanent Stage Manager (losing the “Assistant” from her title forever) of the Arvada Center’s highly accomplished children’s theatre program, starting with Billie McBride’s Lyle the Crocodile.

    In the short three years since, she has helmed mainstage productions at the Aurora Fox, Cherry Creek Theatre Company, The Avenue Theater, Slingshot Theatre and Vintage Theatre, working for an impressive roster of top-notch directors including Sanders, Christy Montour-Larson, Edith Weiss, Bev Newcomb-Madden, Warren Sherrill, Jim Hunt, Piper Lindsay-Arpan, Gavin Mayer, Pat Payne and DCPA Director of Education Allison Watrous.

    Notable credits include Porgy & Bess at the Aurora Fox and Tartuffe, which launched the Arvada Center’s rep company in 2016. And it can’t be underestimated, Allsup said, what it took to start that operation from nothing. Her impressive list of 2017 credits has included Bus Stop, The Drowning Girls and The Foreigner. Coming up, before she bolts: Sense and Sensibility and All My Sons.

    (Story continues below the photo.)

    Maegan Burnell Quote Robert Michael Sanders Miscast True West Awards


    But Allsup says what gives Burnell the most joy has been running the Arvada Center’s annual “teen intensive” — that’s a fully staged Broadway production for students, most recently no less than Les Misérables. That and volunteering to run big benefit events such as Colorado Theatre Guild’s Henry Awards and the Denver Actors Fund’s annual Miscast cabaret at the Town Hall Arts Center.

    “I love seeing the pure joy that she feels when she is working with students who are eager to learn,” Allsup said. “And I think she especially loves mentoring young theatre technicians at the Arvada Center more than anything.”

    Jonathan Allsup Maegan Burnell True West AwardsAs one of the state’s few gainfully employed, full-time stage managers, Burnell really has no free time for charity. But she makes time, Sanders said, because since the minute she landed in Creede, the Colorado theatre family has become her family. That was obvious enough last week when more than 700 packed the Arvada Center to celebrate the life of actor Daniel Langhoff. “You just don’t always see that in other cities,” Allsup said.  

    Allsup thinks Burnell can do just about anything, but he said the most difficult challenge she has ever taken on will simply be leaving the theatre community that has in short order gone from embracing her to utterly depending on her. “Colorado will always be the state that gave her the start of her career,” said Allsup, who was hired as the new Production Manager at Chicago’s Paramount Theatre seven months ago.

    “Maegan stepped into this community and she made a difference everywhere she went,” added Sanders. “She made a lot of places better while she was here.”

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.

    Stage Manager Maegan Burnell 2017: 

    • Drowning Girls, Arvada Center
    • Bus Stop, Arvada Center
    • Les Misérables Teen Intensive, Arvada Center
    • The Foreigner, Arvada Center
    • Henry Awards, Colorado Theatre Guild
    • Miscast 2017, Denver Actors Fund

    About The True West Awards: '30 Days, 30 Bouquets'
    The True West Awards, now in their 17th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2017 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist. His daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    A look back at the history of the True West Awards

    The 2017 True West Awards

  • 2017 True West Award: Haley Johnson and Sydney Parks Smith

    by John Moore | Dec 05, 2017
    2017 True West Awards. Haley Johnson. Sydney Parks Smith

    2017 TRUE WEST AWARDS  

    Day 4: Haley Johnson and Sydney Parks Smith

    August: Osage County
    Vintage Theatre, Aurora
    OpenStage Theatre, Fort Collins

    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    "I'm in charge now!"


    It's one of the most visceral, gut-scraping lines you'll ever hear in a theatre, and it marks a dramatic turning point in Tracy Letts' Pulitzer-winning family fracas August: Osage County. In that one moment, the eldest daughter of perhaps the must acidic matriarch in the American theatrical canon forcibly wrests that crown right out of her mother's clenched fingers. Only the crown, in this case, is a pill bottle. But Barbara is not rescuing her mother. Not by a long shot. She's becoming her.

    True West Haley Johnson Sydney Parks SmithThe mother is Violet Weston, a pained and profane Okie with cancer of the mouth — medically and metaphorically. Violet pops out furious epithets — most aimed at her three daughters — as quickly as she pops in pills. Her spawn all bear varying degrees of the inherited burns they surely will pass down to their own children. Seriously, Violet is a sniper on par with a Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant. It's a bucket-list role for any seasoned female actor.

    But the part of Barbara, a Boulder mom whose marriage is crumbling, presents a plum challenge all its own. And in 2017, we got to see two highly accomplished area actors tackle it in different but effective ways: Sydney Parks Smith for OpenStage & Company in Fort Collins and Haley Johnson for Vintage Theatre in Aurora. And they had formidable scene partners in Colorado legends Denise Freestone and Deborah Persoff, respectively, as their poisoned Vi's.

    Parks wears Barbara's accumulating disappointments like a suit of armor, and she's just itching to take it into battle. Johnson, who has made her mark for a decade playing wounded birds, grew teeth here that eventually sprouted into fangs. The mother-daughter conflict builds to a battle of ill-wills that left audiences gasping from Fort Collins to Aurora. All culminating in that one haunting line — "I'm in charge now!" — that can be delivered every which way from a declarative whisper to a savage declaration of war. We're witnessing a brutal metamorphosis where Barbara becomes the unshrinking Violet.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    The two actors have more than Barbara Fordham in common: Smith is the Associate Artistic Director of OpenStage and Johnson is the Producing Artistic Director of the new Benchmark Theatre, which is finishing up its first season with the world premiere of a freaky-fun new play called Smokefall, playing through Dec. 23 at the Buntport Theater.

    Haley Johnson Sydney Parks SmithSmith won the Colorado Theatre Guild's Henry Award and the OpenStage OPUS Award for Outstanding Actress for her performance as Barbara. Northern Colorado theatre critic Tom Jones called her performance "dynamite."

    Says OpenStage Director Dulcie Willis:
    "Sydney is a highly passionate, focused and dynamic actor. Her work as Barbara perfectly illustrated her deep commitment to nuanced character development. She understood the play inside and out and never, ever stopped working to find the most effective moment-to-moment choices in each scene. Her natural strength and intense zest for life served her thoughtful approach to Barbara while leading the entire cast through a beautiful and challenging piece of theatre. She really was the family heroine of our production."

    (Photos above: Sydney Parks Smith, left and Haley Johnson. Photos by Joe Hovorka and RDG Photography.)

    Says Vintage Theatre Director Bernie Cardell: "The magic of Haley Johnson is that not only can she tap into the broken heart of her characters, she can also find their humor.  She is not afraid to reveal her own wounds in order to find the deepest expression of truth on stage. Plus, she's kind of cool."

    The origin of the poison: Our interview with Tracy Letts

    Said Denver Theatre Perspectives reviewer Michael Mulhern: "Haley Johnson showed incredible range from fragile and bitter to powerful matriarch, and from defeated daughter to hopeful independence."

    Haley Johnson: 2017 at a glance

    Johnson is a graduate of Florida State University and the University of Colorado Denver. She has worked all around the metro area, including the Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, Edge Theatre, Miners Alley Playhouse and Spotlight Theatre Company. Notable roles include Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire, Harper Pitt in Angels in America, Becca in Rabbit Hole and Jessie in 'Night, Mother. She is also the producing artistic director of the new Benchmark Theatre.
    • The Nether, Morris, Benchmark Theatre
    • August: Osage County, Barbara Fordham, Vintage Theatre
    Sydney Parks Smith: 2017 at a glance

    Smith has performed and directed with OpenStage Theatre in Fort Collins for the past 20 years and serves as the company's  Associate Artistic Director. Notable roles include Claire in Proof, Kate in The Taming of the Shrew, Belinda in Noises Off and Hermia in Dead Man’s Cell Phone. As a director, her credits include Stage Kiss, True West, The Book of Liz and Dirty Blonde. She received the Founder’s Award for her outstanding contributions to OpenStage & Company.

    • The Flick, Director, OpenStage
    • Don’t Dress for Dinner, Production Manager, OpenStage
    • Bright Ideas, Production Manager, OpenStage
    • August: Osage County, Barbara Fordham, Production Manager, OpenStage

    ABOUT THE TRUE WEST AWARDS: '30 DAYS, 30 BOUQUETS'
    The True West Awards, now in their 17th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2017 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist. His daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    A look back at the history of the True West Awards

    The 2017 True West Awards

  • Video playlist: Our 2017 Henry Awards coverage

    by John Moore | Jul 27, 2017


    This, the third in our series of DCPA NewsCenter videos from the 2017 Henry Awards, offers part of the presentation of the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award to Germinal Stage-Denver co-founders Denver Ed Baierlein and Sallie Diamond.

    Ed Baierlein. BLF Photography. Of her husband, Diamond said: "I don't think there is anybody I have ever seen who has brought me to the theatrical catharsis that you are supposed to have when you see someone on stage. He's very funny. He's very touching. He can make you cry. He can make me cry."

    The award was presented by their son, Tad Baierlein. Germinal Stage-Denver is currently presenting Seascape, by Edward Albee, through Aug. 20 in the black-box theatre at Westminster High School, 6933 Raleigh St. Call 303-455-7108.

    The Colorado Theatre Guild's 12th annual Henry Awards were held on July 17 at the PACE Center in Parker.

     

    Video by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. More videos will be added to this special YouTube playlist.

    Previous 2017 Henry Awards videos:
    2017 Henry Awards Outstanding Musicals in performance
    Watch our 2017 Memoriam video honoring those who have died

    Complete NewsCenter coverage of the 2017 Henry Awards:

    Our complete photo coverage of the 2017 awards
    2017 Henry Award nominations make way for the new
    Nominations: Henry Awards spreads love from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins


    Our complete photo gallery from the 2017 Henry Awards:

    2017 Henry Awards Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. To see more, click on the forward arrow above.

  • Photo coverage: 2017 Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2017
    2017 Henry Awards

    Our complete photo gallery from the Colorado Theatre Guild’s 2017 Henry Awards ceremony held July 17 at the PACE Center in Parker. To see more, click the forward arrow on the image above. All photos may be instantly downloaded and shared with proper photo credit. All photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    The Henry Awards honor outstanding achievements by member companies. To read our full report, click here. The photo above shows hosts Steven J. Burge and GerRee Hinshaw at the PACE Center in Parker.

    Read our full report: Henry Awards spreads love across state

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    2017 HENRY AWARDS. Stephen Day
    Stephen Day, who won Outstanding Actor in a musical, performs from the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center's 'The Ma of La Mancha' at the Henry Awards. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Our 2017 Henry Awards memorial video:


    Video by John Moore. More video coverage from the event to come, including performances and acceptance speeches.

  • Henry Awards spreads love from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins

    by John Moore | Jul 17, 2017
    29 Outstanding Season



    Openstage, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, TheatreWorks and The Book of Will leave indelible marks

    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    The Colorado Theatre Guild’s 2017 Henry Awards was a night of open arms and poignant remembrance, culminating with OpenStage Theatre and Company winning the Guild’s highest honor for the first time, for Outstanding Season. The 44-year-old Fort Collins tradition also swept both outstanding actor and actress awards: Sydney Parks Smith for August: Osage County and Steven P. Sickles for Le Bête,

    Henry Awards by YearUntil 2013, theatre companies outside the metro area were not eligible for Henry Awards, but on Monday night at the PACE Center in Parker, the Henrys rolled out the welcome mat for statewide companies.

    Colorado Springs TheatreWorks’ The Game of Love and Chance was named Outstanding Play. That was the final play directed by company founder Murray Ross, who died in January. Drew Martorella, Executive Director of UCCS Presents, dedicated the award to Ross' considerable legacy.

    The Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, in its final year before merging with Colorado College, tied with the DCPA Theatre Company for most wins for the evening with five, all for The Man of La Mancha. The DCPA won Outstanding New Play and four other awards for its world premiere of The Book of Will. DCPA CEO Janice Sinden announced to the crowd that the play, written by Lauren Gunderson about the creation of Shakespeare's First Folio, already has four major stagings scheduled around the country. "Lauren Gunderson will be the first female playwright with an original play on the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Elizabethan Stage in its 83-year history," Sinden said to raucous cheers.

    Thunder River Theatre Company of Carbondale won the first two Henrys in its history, both for four-time 2017 nominee Sean Jeffries. Carbondale is a mountain hamlet of 5,200 residents located between Aspen and Glenwood Springs. Jeffries won for both sound (The Tempest) and scenic (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) awards among Tier II companies.

    Just in: Check out all of our photos from the awards

    The Lone Tree Arts Center, which won its first Henry Award just last year, broke through with three wins on Monday for its production of Evita. The show, which re-cast the guerilla Che as more of a tormenting artist, was the surprise winner of the Outstanding Musical award. Even the Backstage Breckenridge Theatre got in on the act with its irreverent Toxic Avenger musical winning both the Outstanding Actress (Colby Dunn) and Supporting Actress (Megan Van De Hey) awards.

    Perhaps the emotional highlight of the evening was Tad Baierlein presenting the Life Achievement Award to his parents, Germinal Stage co-founders Ed Bairelein and Sallie Diamond Baierlein.

     

    2017 Henry Award nominations make way for the new

    While the annual Henry Awards often turn into landslides, 2017 will go down as the most widely spread in the 12-year history of the awards. The 25 competitive awards were distributed among 10 member companies.

    That still left a number of the metro area's most prestigious companies on the sidelines this year, including Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Buntport Theater, Phamaly Theatre Company and the Town Hall Arts Center.

    The Catamounts, which earned nine nominations for its punk musical take on Beowulf, won none. The Aurora Fox, despite five nominations for a Porgy and Bess that in performance Monday brought the capacity crowd to its screaming feet, also went away empty-handed. Last year the Henry Awards' darlings were Theatre Aspen and Vintage Theatre, winners of 12 awards. This year? None.

    Despite 16 nominations, the Arvada Center, a perennial Henrys favorite, won only one award - and it was perhaps the most surprising of the night. Matt LaFontaine, who took on the role of Judas in the Arvada Center's Jesus Christ Superstar just days before opening, was named Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical. A grateful and humble LaFontaine dedicated the award to actor Napoleon Kaufman, who was originally cast as Judas but had to drop out due to illness, and Daniel Langhoff, who is continuing to battle cancer.

    "I shouldn’t be up here," LaFontaine told the crowd. 

    Curious Theatre Company, second only to the DCPA and Arvada Center in total Henry Awards received since 2006, pulled out of consideration last July after the company was shut out of the Henry Awards for the second straight year. Managing Director Katie Maltais cited what she called the judges' “limited knowledge of the theatre craft, especially with regard to technical design,” as well as the lack of diversity among last year’s winners. That complaint only stands to grow louder after last night, which produced only three apparent winners of color.

    Given the political climate, the evening was  remarkably civil in tone. Hosts Steven J.  Burge and GerRee Hinshaw teased the crowd at the top of the show to expect no holds barred political commentary throughout the evening, but it was all a ruse for keeping things light. The only variance came when Stephen Day accepted the Henry Award for Outstanding Actor in a Musical. Day, who plays the delusionally hopeful knight Cervantes in The Man of LaMancha, said, "I want to thank the current administration in Washington for giving me my subtext every night."  

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    The Henry Awards honor outstanding achievements by member companies, and the event serves as the Colorado Theatre Guild’s annual fundraiser. The awards are named for longtime local theatre producer Henry Lowenstein. Nominations are determined through a judging process conducted by more than 45 theatre journalists, blogger critics and adjudicators from the community.

    The Henry Awards split the four design categories into two tiers determined by member companies' annual overall operating budgets. Only six companies have annual budgets above the $1.2 million threshold and therefore are considered Tier I: The DCPA, Arvada Center, Creede Repertory Theatre, Theatre Aspen, Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center and Colorado Springs TheatreWorks. The rest all compete in Tier II.

    The Guild made great strides in expanding the eligible pool this year to a record 190 productions. But it also reduced the number of judges required to make each show eligible from six to five, which likely accounts for some of the pronounced clustering of nominations around certain shows.

    It was announced at the show that Gloria Shanstrom, who has served the Colorado Theatre Guild for more than 20 years and has administered the Henry Awards since their inception, is retiring at the end of the month. Monday's ceremony, which has been directed for the past 11 years by Jim Hunt, were led this year by Jonathan D. Allsup.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.



    2017 Henry Awards video:


    Video by DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore.

    2016-17 HENRY AWARDS

    Outstanding Season for a Theatre Company

    • OpenStage Theatre and Company, Fort Collins

    Also nominated:

    • Arvada Center
    • OpenStage Theatre and Company
    • Colorado Springs TheatreWorks
    • DCPA Theatre Company
    • Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Thunder River Theatre Company


    Outstanding Production of a Play

    16 GameLoveChanceGame of Love and Chance
    TheatreWorks
    Murray Ross, Director

    Also nominated:

    • "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company, Dulcie Willis, Director
    • "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company, Davis McCallum, Director
    • "Constellations," TheatreWorks, Joye Cook-Levy, Director
    • "Don’t Dress for Dinner," OpenStage Theatre & Company, Wendy S. Moore, Director"
    • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," Thunder River Theatre Company, Corey Simpson, Director
    • "Tartuffe," Arvada Center, Lynne Collins, Director


    Outstanding Musical

    28 EVITA BM at the Lone Tree Arts Center credit Danny LamEvita

    Lone Tree Arts Center
    Gina Rattan, Director; Max Mamon, Musical Director

    Also nominated:

    • "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts, Meridith C. Grundei, Director; Gary Grundei, Musical Direction                         
    • "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company, Scott RC Levy, Director; Sharon Skidgel, Musical Direction
    • "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative, Kelly McAllister, Director; Tanner Kelly, Musical Direction                                
    • "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center, Kenny Moten, Director; Jalyn Courtenay Webb, Musical Direction
    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center, Randal Myler, Director; Dan Wheetman, Musical Direction
    • "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center, donnie l. betts, Director; Jodel Charles, Musical Direction


    Outstanding New Play

    10 New Play or Musical DCPA Theatre Company The Book of Will by Lauren Gunderson Directed by Davis McCallum The Book of Will

    DCPA Theatre Company
    Written by Lauren Gunderson
    Directed by Davis McCallum

    Also nominated:

    • “The Firestorm,” by Meridith Friedman
    • "Full Code," by David Valdes Greenwood
    • "The History Room," by Charlie Thurston           
    • "I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” Music and Lyrics by David Nehls, Book by Kenn McLaughlin
    • "Lost Creatures," by Melissa Lucero McCarl
    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There,” by Randal Myler

    Direction of a Play
    23 Direction - Dulcie  Willis - August Osage CountyDulcie Willis
    August: Osage County

    OpenStage Theatre & Company

    Also nominated:

    • Lynne Collins, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Joye Cook-Levy, "Constellations," TheatreWorks
    • Davis McCallum, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Matt Radcliffe, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Murray Ross, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Corey Simpson, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," Thunder River Theatre Company

    Direction of a Musical
    27 Direction - Man of La ManchaScott RC Levy
    Man of La Mancha

    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • donnie l. betts, "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Meridith C. Grundei, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Kelly McAllister, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • Randal Myler, “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Gina Rattan, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Nick Sugar, “First Date,” Lake Dillon Theatre Company

    Outstanding Musical Direction
    25 Musical Direction EVITA at the Lone Tree Arts Center credit Danny LamMax Mamon
    Evita

    Lone Tree Arts Center

    Also nominated:

    • Neal Dunfee, “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” BDT Stage
    • Gary Grundei, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Sharon Skidgel, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Jason Tyler Vaughn, “Murder Ballad,” The Edge Theater Company
    • Jalyn Courtenay Webb, "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center
    • Dan Wheetman, “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center


    Outstanding Actress in a Musical
    20 Toxic Avenger Colby DunnColby Dunn
    The Toxic Avenger

    Breckenridge Backstage Theatre

    Also nominated:

    • Jacquie Jo Billings, "Little Shop of Horrors," Miners Alley Playhouse
    • Sarah Groeke, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Cecilia Iole, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Marissa Rudd, "Sister Act," Midtown Arts Center
    • Tracy Warren, “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” BDT Stage
    • Danielle Hermon Wood, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative




    Outstanding Actor in a Musical

    21 Actor - Man of La ManchaStephen Day
    Man of La Mancha

    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company 

    Also nominated:

    • Leonard E. Barrett Jr. , "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Joshua Blanchard, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Miles Jacoby, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • August Stoten, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative
    • Colin Summers, "Million Dollar Quartet," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Joe Von Bokern, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts

    Outstanding Actress in a Play
    14 Actress - Sydney Parks Smith - August Osage CountySydney Parks Smith
    August: Osage County

    OpenStage Theatre & Company

    Also nominated:   

    • LuAnn Buckstein, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre
    • Carley Cornelius, "Constellations," TheatreWorks
    • Denise Burson Freestone, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company      
    • Kathleen McCall, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Emma Messenger, "Misery," The Edge Theater Company
    • Caitlin Wise, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks

    Outstanding Actor in a Play
    15 Actor - Steven P. Sickles - La BeteSteven P. Sickles
    Le Bête

    OpenStage Theatre & Company

    Also nominated:

    • William Hahn, "Burn This," The Edge Theater Company 
    • Kevin Hart, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre
    • Sammie Joe Kinnett, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Micah Speirs, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company               
    • Dan Tschirhart, "The Flick," OpenStage Theatre & Company        
    • Adam Verner, "Don’t Dress for Dinner," OpenStage Theatre & Company                                                                                                         


    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play

    03 Supporting Actress in a Play Miriam A. LaubeMiriam A. Laube
    The Book of Will

    DCPA Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Miriam A. Laube, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Carolyn Lohr, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre              
    • Leslie O’Carroll, "Silent Sky," Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Amelia Pedlow, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Christina Sajous, "Disgraced," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Linda Suttle, "A Time to Kill," Vintage Theatre Productions
    • Edith Weiss, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre



    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play

    04 Supporting Actor in a Play Triney SandovalTriney Sandoval
    The Book of Will

    DCPA Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Nathan Cox, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Rodney Lizcano, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Wesley Mann, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Owen O’Farrell, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Hunter Ringsmith, "Equivocaton," Colorado Shakespeare Festival            
    • Corey Simpson, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company



    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical

    07 Toxic Avenger MEGAN VAN DE HEYMegan Van De Hay
    The Toxic Avenger

    Breckenridge Backstage Theatre

    Also nominated:

    • Jenna Bainbridge, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Joan Bruemmer-Holden, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Charlotte Campbell, “A Christmas Story,” Midtown Arts Center
    • Anna High, “Porgy and Bess,” Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Rebecca Hoodwin, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Carol Rose, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre


    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical

    08 Supporting Actor in a Musical - Matt LaFontaine - Jesus Christ Superstar - Arvada CenterMatt LaFontaine
    Jesus Christ Superstar

    Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities

    Also nominated:

    • Brandon Bill, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative
    • Ben Hilzer, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • John Jankow, "A Christmas Story," Midtown Arts Center
    • Bob Moore, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Nicholas Park, “First Date,” Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Kyle Ashe Wilkinson, "Titanic," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre



    09 EnsembleOutstanding Ensemble Performance

    The Book of Will

    DCPA Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center, Lynne Collins, Director
    • "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center
    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center



    Outstanding Choreography

    24 josephMatthew D. Peters
    Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

    BDT Stage

    Also nominated:

    • Mary Ripper Baker, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Joan Bruemmer-Holden & Amanda Berg Wilson, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Jeff Duke and Stephanie Hansen, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Kelly Kates, “The Robber Bridegroom,” Town Hall Arts Center
    • Michael Lasris, "A Christmas Story," Midtown Arts Center
    • Kate Vallee, "42nd Street," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse  


    DESIGN AWARDS

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 1
    01 Sound Design - Man of La ManchaBenjamin Heston
    Man of La Mancha

    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Jason Ducat, “Constellations,” TheatreWorks
    • Jason Ducat, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Morgan McCauley, "Tartuffe," Arvada Center
    • Stowe Nelson, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • David Thomas, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Zach Williamson, “The Secret Garden, “ DCPA Theatre Company

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 2
    02 Sound-Tier2-Tempest-TRTCSean Jeffries
    The Tempest

    Thunder River Theatre Company 

    Also nominated:

    • Travis Duncan and Jeremiah Walter, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Carlos Flores, "Misery," The Edge Theater Company
    • Allen Noftall, “Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Allen Noftall, “Muscle Shoals: I’ll Take You Theatre," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Jon Northridge, "Million Dollar Quartet," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Tom Quinn and Kenny Storms, "Murder Ballad," The Edge Theater Company

    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 1
    05 LightingDesign-Man of La ManchaHolly Anne Rawls
    Man of La Mancha

    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Charles R. MacLeod, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company  
    • Shannon McKinney, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Jon Olson, “The Drowning Girls,” Arvada Center
    • Paul Toben, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Brian Tovar, "Frankenstein," DCPA Theatre Company   
    • Mike Wood, “Constellations,” TheatreWorks


    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 2

    06 Lighting Evita Danny LamJen Kiser
    Evita

    Lone Tree Arts Center

    Also nominated 

  • Seth Alison, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
  • Brandon Ingold, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company
  • Sean Jeffries, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” Thunder River Theatre Company
  • Sean Jeffries, “The Last Romance,” Thunder River Theatre Company
  • Sean Mallary, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
  • Brett Maughan, "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," BDT Stage

  •  

    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 1
    12 Camille_AssafCamille Assaf
    The Book of Will

    DCPA Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Stephanie Bradley, "Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Janson J. Fangio, "Enchanted April," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Sydney Gallas, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Clare Henkel, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Clare Henkel, "Tartuffe," Arvada Center
    • Lex Liang, “Shrek,” Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company



    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 2

    13 Little Mermaid- RMRTJesus Perez
    The Little Mermaid

    Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre

    Also nominated:

    • Kari Armstrong, "The Snow Queen," Bas Bleu Theatre Company
    • Buntport Theater, "The Crud," Buntport Theater
    • Pamela Clifton, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre         
    • Judith Ernst, "The Wizard of Oz," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
    • Tricia Music, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • Annabel Reader, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts


    Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 1

    18 Scenic Design - Man of La ManchaChristopher L. Sheley
    Man of La Mancha

    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Lisa Orzolek, "Disgraced," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Brian Mallgrave, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Brian Mallgrave, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Sandra Goldmark, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Paul Black, "Mamma Mia," Theatre Aspen
    • Jason Sherwood, "Frankenstein," DCPA Theatre Company


    Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 2

    19 Scenic-Tier2-Jekyll-and-Hyde-TRTCSean Jeffries
    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    Thunder River Theatre Company

    Also nominated:

    • Shaun Albrechtson, "Steel Magnolias," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • James Brookman, “August: Osage County,” OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • M. Curtis Grittner, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre
    • Sean Jeffries, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Sean Jeffries, “The Last Romance,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Lori Rosedahl, "The Flick," OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • Kyle Scoggins, "Little Shop of Horrors," Miners Alley Playhouse


    SPECIAL AWARDS:

    Specials collage


    LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN THEATRE
    Ed Baierlein and Sallie Diamond Baierlein, Germinal Stage Denver

    EXCELLENCE IN SPECIAL MAKEUP EFFECTS
    Todd Debreceni

    OUTSTANDING IMPROVISATIONAL THEATRE
    ScriptProv

    OUTSTANDING THEATRE BENEFACTORS
    Les Crispelle
    Glenn Tiedt

  • Lake Dillon Theatre Company strikes gold in Silverthorne

    by John Moore | Jun 24, 2017
    Silverthorne Performing Arts CenterPhotos from Friday's grand opening of the new $9 million Silverthorne Performing Arts Center. To see more, click the forward arrow on the image above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Lake Dillon makes big splash with three new theatres that are already stimulating Summit County economy


    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    They call it the $9 million email, and it is now framed in the lobby of the new Silverthorne Performing Arts Center that opened to great fanfare last night with the opening performance of Lake Dillon Theatre Company’s Sister Act, The Musical.

    It’s a remarkably ordinary email dated Aug. 15, 2013, written by Artistic Director Christopher Alleman confirming an upcoming meeting with Silverthorne Town Manager Ryan Hyland.

    SILVERTHORNE. Lake Dillon“The truth is, it was a really boring email,” Hyland said. But the drama hidden between the keystrokes was anything but. The acclaimed Lake Dillon Theatre Company, which had been presenting award-winning theatre in Dillon’s original, teeny-tiny Town Hall cabin since 1995, would soon be made homeless. The town of Dillon planned to redevelop the historic site, so it was time for the theatre company to find a new home.

    That boring email was the start of a beautiful relationship with the girl, er, town next door. And that partnership culminated Friday with the grand opening of the $9 million Silverthorne Arts Center. The new 16,000 square-foot jewel brings the cultural heft of three performing spaces to a town best known for its sprawl of irresistible outlet shops about 70 miles west of Denver.

    (Pictured above right: Curtain call after the inaugural performance of 'Sister Act.' Photo by John Moore.)

    The deal called for Silverthorne to kick in $6.3 million and the theatre company $2.7 million. “This was the smartest thing we could have ever done,” Hyland said.

    SILVERTHORNE. Lake Dillon“It is supporting arts and culture, which is such an incredibly enriching tool for our community, particularly our youth. But it is also absolutely an investment in economic development. It’s not some wild idea to say that that if you bring culture to a downtown, you can generate economic activity. It’s been proven. And this performing-arts center will be a catalyst for big things to come in this downtown.”

    (Pictured above right, from left: Ryan Hyland, Chris Alleman and Joshua Blanchard. Photo by John Moore.)

    When the cultural partnership was announced two years ago, Hyland said, investors immediately started to look at Silverthorne differently. “Before the first shovel went into the ground, we secured a 32-unit condo development across the way that I can attribute directly to this partnership,” Hyland said. “There is also a brewery and a new restaurant coming, so we haven't even started yet.”

    SILVERTHORNE. Lake DillonThe Silverthorne Performing Arts Center, located in the Town Center at 4th Street and Blue River Parkway, is anchored by a still-intimate 165-seat mainstage theatre called The Flex, where Sister Act opened Lake Dillon’s 23rd season on Friday and plays through Aug. 13. To maximize space, the orchestra performs live in a specially constructed studio next to the backstage dressing rooms.

    The 60-seat studio theatre next door will remind faithful Lake Dillon theatregoers of the company’s longtime cramped cabin home just a mile up Highway 6 in Dillon. That opens with the musical adaptation of the movie Ghost on July 1, running through Aug. 27. There is also a small classroom theatre that will host the company’s Lab Solo Series – successive one-actor plays Buyer and Cellar (June 30-July 9), Grounded (Aug. 11-20) and Pretty Fire (Sept. 15-24).

    Grand Lake's Rocky Mountain Rep opens 50th season

    When Ghost and Buyer and Cellar open, the company will have productions running in all three of its performance facilities. On most days of the week, theatregoers will have two of them to choose from.

    And just outside the entrance to the very mod arts center, designed by Denver’s Oz Architecture, is an outdoor music pavilion that will bring Hazel Miller (July 8), Chris Daniels and the Kings (July 15) and comedian Jim Breuer (Sept. 13), among many others, to Summit County this summer.

    SILVERTHORNE. Lake DillonThe Lake Dillon Theatre Company was conceived by Lennie Singer (mother of Denver actor Jordan Leigh) and B.J. Knapp in 1993. Alleman joined in 2002 with his partner, future Executive Director and actor Joshua Blanchard, who is nominated for a 2017 Henry Award for his performance in last year’s Cabaret. Together they have grown the organization from a $140,000 annual budget to $1.4 million. The company has maintained  a remarkably steady annual growth rate of about 13 percent.

    Today the fully professional company supports nine full-time employees and an extensive theatre education program. The full summer company of actors, crew, staff and apprentices numbers 72. The company also includes Arvada Center favorite Adam Estes, who directed Sister Act and stars in Buyer and Cellar, Colorado Shakespeare Festival Henry Award nominee Hunter Ringsmith, and widely acclaimed area designers including Nick Kargel, Brian Mallgrave, Vance Mackenzie and Andy Bakehouse.

    The mood at Friday night’s opening celebration was euphoric. But a better description for Alleman and Blanchard might be exhausted. “I’ve gotten eight hours of sleep in the past three days,” said Alleman, whose fundraising work is not yet done.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    “Our capital campaign is actually for $3.8 million,” he said. "That includes the $2.7 million we put into the building, but also a $500,000 reserve fund, plus the cost of fundraising. We're at $3.2 million right now, so we're not all said and done just yet.”

    SILVERTHORNE. Lake DillonJuliana Davis Ditmyer performed in Lake Dillon Theatre Company's first show under Alleman back in 2002, And the World Goes Round. She now lives in Florida, but came back this summer to be part of this new chapter in the company’s history. She’s choreographing Ghost.  

    “I was dying to be here for this," Davis said. "When I moved to Colorado, I was still not sure what I wanted to do with my life. I was living in Leadville when I stumbled across that little barn theatre in Dillon one day. I had no idea the impact it would have on me. This has not only been an artistic outlet for me but an artistic home. And although the building and surroundings are new, the heart is the same."

    Bob Moore, who has performed at theatres across Colorado since 1965, has appeared in 17 Lake Dillon Theatre Company shows, including the Monsignor in Sister Act. Make that 18 when he joins daughter Missy Moore in Noises Off, opening Sept. 1. (The director is his wife and her mother, Wendy Moore.)

    “This is now a destination facility, both for audiences and actors,” Bob Moore said. Missy Moore, who won the 2017 Henry Award for the Edge Theatre’s Getting Out, said, “Lake Dillon is absolutely bringing theatre in this part of Colorado to the next level.”

    Recent True West Award winner Sharon Kay White, who plays Mother Superior in Sister Act, is among many professional actors from Denver who find the mountain employment with Lake Dillon to be both rewarding and fulfilling. Among Colorado theatre companies, only the Denver Center and Arvada Center make more professional contracts available to Denver actors each year, Alleman said.

    “It's such an honor to be in the inaugural show in this beautiful space lovingly built by this city that embraced this theatre company that was made suddenly homeless,” said White, who previously played Sister Mary Patrick in the Arvada Center’s production of Sister Act last year. “And my goodness: This city is so beautiful. My plan was to drive home to Denver once a week all summer, but now I think I'm just staying up here all the time.”

    Our statewide Colorado summer theatre guide

    She said the quality of theatre in Silverthorne “fares great” in comparison to Denver’s best theatres. “It’s just bustling with activity. Everything feels new.”

    But while the summer of 2017 may be all about the new, Bob Moore says not everything has changed.

    “I would describe backstage at the old theatre as … very tight,” he said with a smile.  I mean, you really got a chance to know your fellow actors there. I remember a couple of times changing my clothes in the car.”

    And the new place?

    “Well, I would describe backstage at this theatre - for this particular show - as the same. But here’s the difference: There are 22 cast members in the show.” 

    That’s new.


    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.



    SILVERTHORNE. Lake Dillon

    The opening-night afterparty following 'Sister Act.' Photo by John Moore.


    LAKE DILLON THEATRE COMPANY

    At the Silverthorne Performing Arts Center, 460 Blue River Parkway, Silverthorne, 970-513-9386 or lakedillontheatre.org
    Through Aug. 13: Sister Act
    June 30-July 9: Buyer and Cellar
    July 1-Aug. 24: Ghost
    Sept. 1-17: Noises Off
    Aug. 11-20: Grounded
    Sept. 15-24: Pretty Fire

  • 2017 Henry Award nominations make way for the new

    by John Moore | Jun 20, 2017
    Beowulf. Catamounts

    From left: Allison Caw, Amanda Berg Wilson and Joe Von Bokern in The Catmounts'  'Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage,' which tied for the most Henry Award nominations by a musical with nine. Photo by Michael Ensminger. 

    DCPA leads way as always wildly unpredictable nominations embrace companies from Carbondale to Colorado Springs

    By John Moore
    Senior Arts Journalist

    Suffice it to say, a whole lot of people will be attending the Colorado Theatre Guild’s Henry Awards for the very first time.

    While the DCPA Theatre Company led all Colorado companies for the fifth straight year with 21 nominations, followed by the Arvada Center with 16, a plethora of companies that have barely registered on the Henrys’ radar in the past have emphatically taken their place at the table this year – most from outside the Denver metro area.   

    Sean Jeffries. Henry Awards. Thunder RiverThunder River, a small theatre company in Carbondale, didn’t just receive its first Henry Award nominations - it received its first 11. Most of that can be attributed to a mind-boggling individual accomplishment: Sean Jeffries (pictured right) becomes the first person to ever receive five nominations in a single year for his lighting, scenic and sound designs. New Thunder River Executive Artistic Director Corey Simpson also picked up nominations as both a director (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) and supporting actor (The Tempest).

    Lone Tree Arts Center, which mostly presents touring shows and concerts, earned 13 nominations for staging three of its own shows. The city of Colorado Springs steamrolled its way into the party with 12 nominations for TheatreWorks, 11 for the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, and even three for the tiny Springs Ensemble Theatre. The love for TheatreWorks could not have come at a more poignant time, following the January death of founder Murray Ross, who is nominated of Outstanding Direction of Marivaux’s romantic comedy The Game of Love and Chance.

    Denise FreestoneUp in Fort Collins, OpenStage & Company charted 12 nominations, followed by the Midtown Arts Center with seven. Other breakout years: Eight nominations each for the Backstage Breckenridge Theatre, the Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre of Grand Lake, and PACE Center/Inspire Creative. Those nine emerging companies garnered just 17 cumulative nominations last year. This year, they totaled 90.

    (Pictured right: Denise Burson Freestone and Sydney Parks Smith are both nominated as Outstanding Lead Actresses in OpenStage Theatre & Company's 'August: Osage County.') 

    The 12th annual Henry Awards will be presented July 17 at the PACE Center in Parker. The seven companies under consideration for Outstanding Season are the Arvada Center, DCPA Theatre Company, Lone Tree Arts Center, Openstage Theatre & Company, Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre, TheatreWorks and Thunder River.

    Book of Will. Rodney Lizcano The most honored play of the season is the DCPA Theatre Company’s world premiere of Lauren Gunderson’s The Book of Will, with 12 nominations, followed by OpenStage’s August: Osage County, with seven. The Book of Will tells how two obscure members of William Shakespeare’s acting company took it upon themselves to publish the first complete published collection of Shakespeare's plays. It already has been picked up for subsequent productions all around the country.

    (Pictured right: Rodney Lizcano is one of three of 'Book of Will' castmates nominated as Outstanding Supporting Actor.)

    The leading musicals of 2016-17 in a topsy-turvy Outstanding Musical field were Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center's Man of La Mancha and The Catamounts’ Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage, with nine nominations. That was a blood-pumping, gypsy-punk musical based on the ninth-century epic poem with an original score by Dave Malloy, composer of Broadway’s Natasha, Pierre, And The Great Comet of 1812.

    That was followed by the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center’s Man of La Mancha (9), the Arvada Center’s Jesus Christ Superstar (7), PACE Center and Inspire Creative’s collaborative staging of Monty Python’s Spamalot (6) and two Lone Tree Arts Center stagings, of Evita (6) and the world premiere of Randal Myler’s Muscle Shoals (6), which chronicled the music that came out of the famous recording studio in Muscle Shoals, Ala., in the 1960s.

    But all that emergence means a lot of traditional Henry Award favorites are taking a back seat this year. Last year, for example, Performance Now, Vintage, Buntport and Town Hall combined for 29 nominations. This year, the four scored a combined three. 

    The Henry Awards are a notoriously unpredictable affair from year to year, often heaping unexpected love on a breakout company one year and then all but forgetting it the next. Theatre Aspen, which earned a whopping 25 nominations and swept the 2016 Henrys with eight awards, received only one nomination this year.

    Among the ongoing Henry Awards mysteries is the continuing snub of the rock-solid Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, which has now received only four nominations the past three years combined. Phamaly Theatre Company, which makes performance opportunities available to actors with disabilities, was shut out. For the second straight year, Cherry Creek Theatre received no nominations, and the Colorado Shakespeare Festival received just one – for Hunter Ringsmith’s riveting performance as supporting actor in Equivocation.

    One of the most dramatic individual nominations of the year has to be Matt LaFontaine’ s recognition as an Outstanding Actor in a Musical. He assumed the role of Judas in Jesus Christ Superstar just days before the opening because of an illness in the cast.

    Colorado Springs husband and wife Joye Cook-Levy and Scott RC Levy are both nominated as directors - Joye for TheatreWorks’ play Constellations and Scott for Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center’s musical Man of La Mancha. The married couple of Meridith C. Grundei and Gary Grundei are nominated as director and musical director, respectively, of The Catamounts’ Beowulf. And Joan Bruemmer-Holden is nominated as both a supporting actor and the choreographer of that show.

    Other multiple nominees this year include costumer Clare Henkel, scenic designer Brian Mallgrave, and sound designers Jason Ducat and Allen Noftall.

    A glaring omission from this year’s nominee slate is Curious Theatre Company, historically one of the Henrys’ favorite recipients - but also a prime example of the feast-or-famine nature of these awards. After winning a remarkable 20 Henry Awards over three years from 2012-14, Curious was shut out the past two seasons. Artistic Director Chip Walton later pulled his company out of consideration for this year’s awards, citing a profound lack of diversity among last year’s winners.

    Curious Theatre quote“Curious approached the Colorado Theatre Guild with concerns about the lack of diversity represented at the Henry Awards last year, as well as many judges' limited knowledge of the theatre craft, especially with regard to technical design,” said Managing Director Katie Maltais. “As the Guild chose not to change its practices or provide additional learning opportunities for judges, Curious left the Henry Awards. We hope that one day the Henry Awards will showcase the full richness of our theatre community, and our strong stance on equity and inclusion and firm commitment to artistic excellence demands we wait until that day to participate in the awards.” 

    Despite its 21 nominations, the DCPA slate also reflects the roller-coaster nature of the Henry Award nominations. While The Book of Will led all productions with 12 nominations, including three supporting actors, the critically acclaimed Disgraced, The Secret Garden and Frankenstein only managed five among them. The Glass Menagerie earned three.

    The Colorado Theatre Guild is a statewide advocacy group, and last year it expanded its nominations to spread more bounty to more companies throughout the state by now designating seven nominations for each category. This year nominations went to 29 different companies and 56 of 190 eligible shows. The expanded pool of nominees means each has just a 14 percent chance of actually winning.

    The Guild also splits the four design categories into two tiers determined by member companies' annual overall operating budgets. Only six companies have annual budgets above the $1.2 million threshold and therefore are considered Tier I: The DCPA, Arvada Center, Creede Repertory Theatre, Theatre Aspen, Colorado Shakespeare Festival and Colorado Springs TheatreWorks. The rest all compete in Tier II.

    Established in 2006, the Henry Awards serve as the Colorado Theatre Guild's annual fundraising event. The awards are named for longtime local theatre producer Henry Lowenstein. Nominations are determined through a judging process conducted by more than 45 statewide theatre reporters, educators and assigned judges.

    2016-17 HENRY AWARD NOMINATIONS

    Outstanding Season for a Theatre Company

    • Arvada Center
    • Colorado Springs TheatreWorks
    • DCPA Theatre Company
    • Lone Tree Arts Center
    • OpenStage Theatre and Company
    • Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Thunder River Theatre Company

    Outstanding Production of a Play

    • "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company, Dulcie Willis, Director
    • "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company, Davis McCallum, Director
    • "Constellations," TheatreWorks, Joye Cook-Levy, Director
    • "Don’t Dress for Dinner," OpenStage Theatre & Company, Wendy S. Moore, Director
    • "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," Thunder River Theatre Company, Corey Simpson, Director
    • "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks, Murray Ross, Director
    • "Tartuffe," Arvada Center, Lynne Collins, Director

    Outstanding Production of a Musical

    • "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts, Meridith C. Grundei, Director; Gary Grundei, Musical Direction                                
    • "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center, Gina Rattan, Director; Max Mamon, Musical Direction                                
    • "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company, Scott RC Levy, Director; Sharon Skidgel, Musical Direction
    • "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative, Kelly McAllister, Director; Tanner Kelly, Musical Direction                                
    • "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center, Kenny Moten, Director; Jalyn Courtenay Webb, Musical Direction
    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center, Randal Myler, Director; Dan Wheetman, Musical Direction
    • "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center, donnie l. betts, Director; Jodel Charles, Musical Direction

    Outstanding Direction of a Play

    • Lynne Collins, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Joye Cook-Levy, "Constellations," TheatreWorks
    • Davis McCallum, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Matt Radcliffe, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Murray Ross, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Corey Simpson, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Dulcie Willis, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company

    Outstanding Direction of a Musical

    • donnie l. betts, "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Meridith C. Grundei, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Kelly McAllister, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • Scott RC Levy, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Randal Myler, “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Gina Rattan, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Nick Sugar, “First Date,” Lake Dillon Theatre Company

    Outstanding Musical Direction

    • Neal Dunfee, “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” BDT Stage
    • Gary Grundei, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Max Mamon, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Sharon Skidgel, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Jason Tyler Vaughn, “Murder Ballad,” The Edge Theater Company
    • Jalyn Courtenay Webb, "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center
    • Dan Wheetman, “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center

    Outstanding Actor in a Play

    • William Hahn, "Burn This," The Edge Theater Company 
    • Kevin Hart, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre   
    • Sammie Joe Kinnett, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Steven P. Sickles, "Le Bete," OpenStage Theatre & Company     
    • Micah Speirs, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company               
    • Dan Tschirhart, "The Flick," OpenStage Theatre & Company        
    • Adam Verner, "Don’t Dress for Dinner," OpenStage Theatre & Company                                                                                                         

    Outstanding Actress in a Play

    • LuAnn Buckstein, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre      
    • Carley Cornelius, "Constellations," TheatreWorks
    • Denise Burson Freestone, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company      
    • Kathleen McCall, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company          
    • Emma Messenger, "Misery," The Edge Theater Company
    • Sydney Parks Smith, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company 
    • Caitlin Wise, "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks

    Outstanding Actor in a Musical

    • Leonard E. Barrett Jr. , "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Joshua Blanchard, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Stephen Day, “Man of La Mancha,” Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company                                                                
    • Miles Jacoby, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • August Stoten, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative
    • Colin Summers, "Million Dollar Quartet," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Joe Von Bokern, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts

    Outstanding Actress in a Musical

    • Jacquie Jo Billings, "Little Shop of Horrors," Miners Alley Playhouse
    • Colby Dunn, "The Toxic Avenger," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre        
    • Sarah Groeke, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Cecilia Iole, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Marissa Rudd, "Sister Act," Midtown Arts Center
    • Tracy Warren, “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” BDT Stage
    • Danielle Hermon Wood, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative

    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play

    • Nathan Cox, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Rodney Lizcano, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Wesley Mann, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Owen O’Farrell, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Hunter Ringsmith, "Equivocaton," Colorado Shakespeare Festival            
    • Triney Sandoval, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Corey Simpson, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company

    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play

    • Miriam A. Laube, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Carolyn Lohr, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre              
    • Leslie O’Carroll, "Silent Sky," Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Amelia Pedlow, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Christina Sajous, "Disgraced," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Linda Suttle, "A Time to Kill," Vintage Theatre Productions
    • Edith Weiss, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre

    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical

    • Brandon Bill, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center and Inspire Creative
    • Ben Hilzer, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • John Jankow, "A Christmas Story," Midtown Arts Center
    • Matt LaFontaine, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Bob Moore, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Nicholas Park, “First Date,” Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Kyle Ashe Wilkinson, "Titanic," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre

    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical

    • Jenna Bainbridge, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Joan Bruemmer-Holden, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Charlotte Campbell, “A Christmas Story,” Midtown Arts Center
    • Anna High, “Porgy and Bess,” Aurora Fox Arts Center
    • Rebecca Hoodwin, "Cabaret," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    • Carol Rose, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Megan Van De Hey, "The Toxic Avenger," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre   

    DROWNING GIRLS

    Outstanding Ensemble Performance

    • "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center, Lynne Collins, Director
    • "The Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • "Motones vs. Jerseys," Midtown Arts Center
    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • "Porgy and Bess," Aurora Fox Arts Center

    Outstanding New Play or Musical

    • "The Book of Will," by Lauren Gunderson

      Directed by Davis McCallum; Produced by DCPA Theatre Company

    • “The Firestorm,” by Meridith Friedman

      Directed by Pesha Rudnick; Produced by LOCAL Theater Company

    • "Full Code," by David Valdes Greenwood

      Directed by Stephen Weitz; Produced by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company

    • "The History Room," by Charlie Thurston

      Directed by Pesha Rudnick; Produced by Creede Repertory Theatre             

    • "I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” Music and Lyrics by David Nehls, Book by Kenn McLaughlin

      Directed by Gavin Mayer; Produced by Arvada Center

    • "Lost Creatures," by Melissa Lucero McCarl

      Directed by Patrick Elkins-Zeglarski; Produced by And Toto too Theatre Company

    • “Muscle Shoals: I'll Take You There,” by Randal Myler

      Directed by Randal Myler; Produced by Lone Tree Arts Center

    Outstanding Choreography

    • Mary Ripper Baker, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Joan Bruemmer-Holden & Amanda Berg Wilson, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
    • Jeff Duke and Stephanie Hansen, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Kelly Kates, “The Robber Bridegroom,” Town Hall Arts Center
    • Michael Lasris, "A Christmas Story," Midtown Arts Center
    • Matthew D. Peters, "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," BDT Stage
    • Kate Vallee, "42nd Street," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse      

    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 1

    • Camille Assaf, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Stephanie Bradley, "Game of Love and Chance," TheatreWorks
    • Janson J. Fangio, "Enchanted April," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Sydney Gallas, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Clare Henkel, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Clare Henkel, "Tartuffe," Arvada Center
    • Lex Liang, “Shrek,” Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company

    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 2

    • Kari Armstrong, "The Snow Queen," Bas Bleu Theatre Company
    • Buntport Theater, "The Crud," Buntport Theater
    • Pamela Clifton, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre         
    • Judith Ernst, "The Wizard of Oz," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
    • Tricia Music, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • Jesus Perez, "The Little Mermaid," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Annabel Reader, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts

    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 1

    • Charles R. MacLeod, "The Glass Menagerie," DCPA Theatre Company  
    • Shannon McKinney, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Jon Olson, “The Drowning Girls,” Arvada Center
    • Holly Anne Rawls, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Paul Toben, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Brian Tovar, "Frankenstein," DCPA Theatre Company   
    • Mike Wood, “Constellations,” TheatreWorks

    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 2

  • Seth Alison, "Monty Python’s Spamalot," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
  • Brandon Ingold, "August: Osage County," OpenStage Theatre & Company
  • Jen Kiser, "Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
  • Sean Jeffries, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” Thunder River Theatre Company
  • Sean Jeffries, “The Last Romance,” Thunder River Theatre Company
  • Sean Mallary, "Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage," The Catamounts
  • Brett Maughan, "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," BDT Stage
  • Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 1

    • Lisa Orzolek, "Disgraced," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Brian Mallgrave, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Brian Mallgrave, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Christopher L. Sheley, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Sandra Goldmark, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • Paul Black, "Mamma Mia," Theatre Aspen
    • Jason Sherwood, "Frankenstein," DCPA Theatre Company

    Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 2

    • Shaun Albrechtson, "Steel Magnolias," PACE Center & Inspire Creative
    • James Brookman, “August: Osage County,” OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • M. Curtis Grittner, "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike," Breckenridge Backstage Theatre
    • Sean Jeffries, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Sean Jeffries, “The Last Romance,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Lori Rosedahl, "The Flick," OpenStage Theatre & Company
    • Kyle Scoggins, "Little Shop of Horrors," Miners Alley Playhouse

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 1

    • Jason Ducat, “Constellations,” TheatreWorks
    • Jason Ducat, "The Drowning Girls," Arvada Center
    • Benjamin Heston, "Man of La Mancha," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre Company
    • Morgan McCauley, "Tartuffe," Arvada Center
    • Stowe Nelson, "The Book of Will," DCPA Theatre Company
    • David Thomas, "Jesus Christ Superstar," Arvada Center
    • Zach Williamson, “The Secret Garden, “ DCPA Theatre Company

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 2

    • Travis Duncan and Jeremiah Walter, "The Elephant Man," Springs Ensemble Theatre Company
    • Carlos Flores, "Misery," The Edge Theater Company
    • Sean Jeffries, “The Tempest,” Thunder River Theatre Company
    • Allen Noftall, “Evita," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Allen Noftall, “Muscle Shoals: I’ll Take You Theatre," Lone Tree Arts Center
    • Jon Northridge, "Million Dollar Quartet," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    • Tom Quinn and Kenny Storms, "Murder Ballad," The Edge Theater Company
      Additional Special Awards will be announced in July.

    2017 Henry Awards: Ticket information

    • Monday, July 17
    • 6 p.m. drinks; 7 p.m. awards
    • PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Avenue, Parker, MAP IT
    • Tickets: $23 for CTG members, $30 non-members or $50 VIP. Tickets are available at parkerarts.org, or by calling 303-805-6800. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door for $35.
    • Ticket onsale date: June 30

    Nominations by Company:
    DCPA Theatre Company – 21
    Arvada Center – 16
    Lone Tree Arts Center – 13
    OpenStage & Company – 12
    Colorado Springs TheatreWorks – 12
    Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center – 11
    Thunder River Theatre Company – 11
    The Catamounts – 9
    Breckenridge Backstage Theatre – 8
    PACE Center/Inspire Creative - 8
    Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre – 7
    Midtown Arts Center – 7
    Lake Dillon Theatre Company – 6
    Aurora Fox – 5
    The Edge Theatre – 5
    BDT Stage – 3
    Springs Ensemble Theatre – 3
    Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company – 2
    Candlelight Dinner Playhouse – 2
    Miners Alley Playhouse – 2
    And Toto too Theatre Company – 1
    Bas Bleu Theatre – 1
    Buntport Theater– 1
    Creede Repertory Theatre – 1
    Colorado Shakespeare Festival – 1
    Local Theatre Company – 1
    Theatre Aspen – 1
    Town Hall Arts Center – 1
    Vintage Theatre – 1

  • Summit Spotlight: Robert Schenkkan on the danger of denial

    by John Moore | Feb 24, 2017

    Video above by DCPA Video Producer David Lenk and Senior Arts Journalist John Moore.


    In this daily, five-part series for the DCPA NewsCenter, we will introduce you to the plays and playwrights featured at the Denver Center’s 2017 Colorado New Play Summit. Over the past 12 years, 27 plays introduced to the Summit have gone to be premiered on the DCPA Theatre Company mainstage season. Next up: Pulitzer-Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan (The Kentucky Cycle), author of the new history play Hanussen.

    Pulitzer-winning playwright speaks bluntly
    on the danger of denial in a time of authoritarianism

    In 1930s Berlin, the brilliant mentalist Erik Jan Hanussen captivates German audiences with his ability to read minds and his uncanny predictions of the future. His reputation brings him to the attention of avid occultist Adolf Hitler.

    John Moore: Let’s first review your recent history here at the Denver Center.

    Robert Schenkkan: Well here in Denver, you would know The 12, the musical that Neil Berg and I created a year and a half ago, which won the (Colorado Theatre Guild) Henry Award for best new work. Great production. It was very successful.

    John Moore: Well, there have been quite a few more awards since the Henrys. Emmys, most recently I believe a $10,000 Humanitas Prize for writing Hacksaw Ridge. (Note: Shenkkan donated his share of the prize to Doctors Without Borders). You are not exactly a late bloomer, but the last few years have been extraordinary for you, really starting with the 2014 Tony Award for All the Way.

    Robert Schenkkan: I have had a great run. On stage with All the Way and The Great Society, and then the HBO film version of All the Way starring Bryan Cranston that Steven Spielberg and I co-executive produced. Also here in Denver with The 12, and now Hanussen. And then with the movie Hacksaw Ridge, which I co-wrote with Andrew Knight that Mel Gibson directed and Andrew Garfield starred in, which is currently nominated for six Academy Awards. … Stay tuned!

    John Moore: We have gotten happily accustomed to seeing you on the awards circuit: The Emmys. Writers Guild of America. Screen Actors Guild. And coming Sunday:

    Robert Schenkkan: I have eaten a lot of rubber chicken lately, yes.

    Robert Schenkkan. Photo by John Moore

    John Moore: The Academy Awards are Sunday night, so let's talk briefly about Hacksaw Ridge, which manages to be a remarkable story of warfare and pacifism at once.

    Robert Schenkkan: It's an extraordinary story, and it has taken 10 years to get it on screen. It is the true story of the first conscientious objector to win the Medal of Honor, Desmond Doss. A country boy from Virginia whose faith and principles insisted that he go to war, and that same faith and principles also insisted that he not take a life. He became a medic, and in one extraordinary engagement in the battle of Okinawa, he saved upward of 75 or more American and Japanese lives.  It's a mind-boggling story, really.

    John Moore: That's an fascinating transition into the war story you are writing here for the DCPA Theatre Company. Can you introduce us to the story of Hanussen?

    Robert Schenkkan: Hanussen is based on the true story of Erik Jan Hanussen, who was the leading headliner in 1931 in the last days of the Weimar Republic in Berlin. Hanussen was a mentalist. He had a mental act. He could red your mind. He had psychic powers. He could hypnotize and he claimed he could predict the future. He's fascinating character. Very contradictory in many ways. Kind of Shakespearean in his size. It is always hard to parse the truth here, but it is said that Hanussen coached Hitler on how to be a more effective public speaker, and that he cast Hitler's horoscope, that he was his astrologer, and that he had something to do with the Reichstag fire. Hanussen was also Jewish.

    Hanussen. Jamison Jones. Photo by John Moore


    John Moore: How does his religion play into the story?

    Robert Schenkkan: Well, it's something that he keeps on the down-low while he plays this extremely dangerous game with the Nazis. The play is very much about the human condition, in particular our tendency to avoid that which is unpleasant, or that which we don't want to see. It's about denial, and the dangers of denial.

    You have said very forebodingly that this is not the worst time for us to be revisiting the Weimar Republic. Why is this play that goes so far back into history the right play at the right time for what is going on in the world right now?

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    Robert Schenkkan: Well, it's pretty fascinating. The playbook for authoritarianism is an old one. It's pretty well understood. I think one could make a very good claim that we are seeing that play out right now in American politics in this last election. JuRobert Schenkkan Quotest as in the Weimar Republic in Berlin, in the United States in 2017, I think it will be increasingly important for individuals to look to their own conscience and be careful in their decisions. This is not a time to stay silent. This is not a time for denial or avoidance. This is a time for action. 

    John Moore: Who are some of the other historical figures we meet in your play?

    Robert Schenkkan: Well, part of the pleasure of Hanussen is that it is a so-called history play; that it is set with events that actually happened and people we know, and in this case there are some very prominent people that we know. Count Wolfe Von Heldorf, Joseph Goebbles and, of course, Adolf Hitler. It's not often that you see these characters on stage, and of course there is so much baggage that they carry; it presents a unique challenge to the writer I think. What can you do with this that we haven't seen before? Or how can you play with our expectations - what we expect that we will see with this? I have had a lot of fun with this. I think I've gotten it right. I think it will be extremely entertaining and very thought-provoking.

    Robert Schenkkan. Richard Thieriot.John Moore: I don't know how much you have to do with casting, but we here at the Denver Center find it enjoyable that the actor who is playing Hitler (Richard Thieriot) we remember as a masters student who played the Jimmy Stewart role in Harvey (pictured at right by John Moore).

    Robert Schenkkan: That is kind of perfect. He's a wonderful actor, by the way.

    John Moore: This is your first Colorado New Play Summit as a featured playwright.

    Robert Schenkkan: Yes, I have been an observer at two Summits, and I am really very grateful to be here. The way Kent Thompson has structured this is really kind of brilliant. You have the first week of work, ending with a public reading, And then you get another week of work culminating in a second and final reading. That second week of work is absolutely unique. I don't know any other theatre festival in the United States that does anything like that. And it's a really critical for the writer because so often, you are just beginning to get your arms around it just as you near the end of that first week. You are just beginning to say, "Now I see what I need to do." … And then it's over. Well, that's not true here. You get to take the tings that you learned at the first reading and really thrash it out and take all of that complexity and nuance and additional richness back into the text, culminating in a second public reading.

    Sarah Schenkkan. Photo by Adams VisCom. John Moore: This is the first time you have ever gotten to work with your daughter, who is playing three roles in Hanussen (pictured at right by Adams Viscom).

    Robert Schenkkan: Yes, I am very proud to say that I will be working with my daughter, Sarah Schenkkan, who is a professional actress living in New York City. Obviously I have followed her career very closely, but this is the first opportunity we have had to work together. As proud as I am of my professional achievements, my greatest achievement is my children. So it's a real thrill to be here working side-by-side as a professional colleague with Sarah.

    John Moore: Total right turn here: Going back for a second to LBJ and All the Way, what did you think of the guy who played LBJ in the new Natalie Portman movie Jackie?

    Spotlight: Lauren Yee lays it all on the free-throw line

    Robert Schenkkan: I thought he did a very credible job. I thought that he brought a certain gravitas to it. I thought he avoided cliché. And he did not give us any of the more sensationalized - and to my way of thinking less interesting - aspects of LBJ.  

    John Moore: I ask that because the actor is John Carroll Lynch, and he is from Denver.

    Robert Schenkkan: Well, I thought it was a very dignified performance. It was very accurate.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist.

    Hanussen
    Directed by Kent Thompson
    Dramaturgy by Liz Engelman
    Hanussen: Jamison Jones
    Hitler: Richard Thieriot
    Wolfe: Kevin Kilner
    Ernerst Juhn, Bruno Frei and Stage Manager: Andy Nagraj
    Fred Marion, Joseph Goebbles, Young Man and Manager: Robert Montano
    Fritzi, Katrina and Maria Paudler: Sarah Schenkkan
    Servant, Rudolf Steinle and Nobleman: Leigh Miller
    Businessman and Kurt Egger: Jason Delane
    Stage Directions: Luke Sorge

    Leigh Miller and the cast of Hanussen. Photo by Adams VisComLeigh Miller and the cast of 'Hanussen' in rehearsal. Photo by Adams VisCom.

    Building the Wall: A new Schenkkan play coming to Curious Theatre
    Note: Immediately after the presidential election, Robert Schenkkan wrote the play Building the Wall, which imagines the first six months of the Donald Trump presidency while invoking George Orwell’s 1984 and the Nazi regime. The play focuses on the frontman of the new administration, who loses his humanity amid chaos and martial law. It is, Schenkkan says, “a terrifying and gripping exploration of what happens if we let fear win.” The play, starring John Jurcheck and Brynn Tucker (who is appearing at the Colorado New Play Summit in Last Night and the Night Before) from April 4-19 at Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Call 303-623-0524.

    Selected previous coverage of the 2017 Colorado New Play Summit:
    2017 Summit welcomes dozens for opening rehearsal
    Summit Spotlight: Robert Schenkkan on the dangers of denial
    Summit Spotlight: Lauren Yee lays it all on the free-throw line
    Summit Spotlight: Rogelio Martinez on when world leaders collide
    Summit Spotlight: Donnetta Lavinia Grays on the aftermath of trauma
    Summit Spotlight: Eric Pfeffinger on the fertile comedy of a divided America
    Record four student writers to have plays read at Summit
    DCPA completes field of five 2017 Summit playwrights

    The 12th Annual Colorado New Play Summit
    Launch Weekend: Feb. 18-19
    Festival Weekend: Feb. 24-26
    More details: denvercenter.org/summit


    Hacksaw Ridge
    : The official trailer

  • 2016 True West Award: Sharon Kay White

    by John Moore | Dec 24, 2016
    True West Award Sharon Kay White


    30 DAYS, 30 BOUQUETS

    Day 24: Sharon Kay White

    Sharon Kay White is all kinds of funny – literally. Close-to-the-bone funny, rim-shot funny, vaudevillian funny. You name a style, and the dependable musical-theatre veteran knows a different way to make you laugh.

    White showed off at least three kinds of funny in three charmingly diverse performances in 2016. She nearly stole the show out from under infamous thief Frank Abagnale Jr. as the con man’s mother-in-law in the Aurora Fox’s Catch Me If You Can. She was just cheek-pinchable as the jovial cloistered nun Sister Mary Patrick in the Arvada Center’s Sister Act. And she brought the year home like the seasoned pro she is originating the role of a throwback variety-show sidekick in the Arvada Center’s world-premiere holiday musical, I’ll Be Home for Christmas. 

    True West Award. Sharon Kay White. Tim Howard. Photo by Christine Fisk. “You give that woman a song with a bit of sass and humor in it, and she’ll knock it out of the park every time. That’s her,” said actor Amy Board, her castmate in 2007’s The Great American Trailer Park Musical. “She knows how to set up a joke - and she knows how to drive it home.”

    Yes, White was every kind of funny in 2016. But there’s much more to her. White is a classic, old-school hoofer, Board said. But if you give her a chance to break your heart, then you had better grab a broom to sweep up the pieces. She brought Carol Burnett’s mother to gritty life in a memorable 2008 turn in Hollywood Arms, followed in 2011 by a riveting turn as the relentless social activist Emma Goldman in Ragtime.

    (Photo above and right: Sharon Kay White and Tim Howard in the Aurora Fox's 'Catch Me If You Can.' Photo by Christine Fisk.)

    “Sharon’s humor is well-known, but her excellence in dramatic roles is something many audience members don’t see coming,” said Arvada Center Artistic Producer Rod Lansberry. “Her work in Hollywood Arms still stands out as one of her strongest roles - as well as her Emma Goldman in Ragtime. We love her for her humor, but we admire her for her versatility.”

    Read our 'meet-the-cast' feature on Sharon Kay White

    Oddly enough, the Denver Center for the Performing Arts inadvertently changed the direction of White’s life forever in 1996. Not by hiring her to perform here, but rather by keeping her from performing here.

    Pop star Debbie Gibson’s national touring production of Funny Girl was supposed to be Broadway-bound. White, who was a member of that touring cast, had been a gainfully employed New York actor for years. She had starred as no less than Adelaide in a national touring production of Guys & Dolls, but Funny Girl was going to be her Broadway debut. Until late DCPA President Randy Weeks previewed the show in Minneapolis and was so unimpressed, he canceled the show’s upcoming Denver booking. And when Denver dropped out, the tour fizzled out.

    True West Award Sharon Kay White QuoteWhite took stock. She decided to exit the New York rat race and move to Colorado to live a more normal life. Why Colorado? “I saw picture of Colorado in a magazine on an airplane and said, ‘I am going there,’ ” she said.

    White came here intending to become a respectable Realtor – and she still is one. She has also had a reliable second career as a transcriber for all kinds of television shows – a job she can do from her home in Denver. But shortly after she arrived in Colorado, she got the acting bug again, and it has never left her since. She became a favorite of the now shuttered Country Dinner Playhouse, where she brought her Broadway-caliber Adelaide of Guys & Dolls to Arapahoe County. She also had memorable turns as a stripper in Gypsy and as Mrs. Potts in Beauty and the Beast, among many others.

    “She is a rock star,” said Paul Dwyer, who co-starred and produced many of her shows there. “She can do anything.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    White started 2016 with her surprisingly affecting turn in Catch Me If You Can, which further solidified Tim Howard as perhaps the leading leading man among the local twentysomethings. “But the night belongs to Sharon Kay White as the blusteringly sexy comic tour de force, Carol Strong, the Deep-South mother of Abignale’s fiancé,” wrote Dave Perry of the Aurora Sentinel. “White is famous for making every role seem that it was written for her, and this one is a memorable escapade that encapsulates the best part of the show.”

    In Sister Act, based on the Whoopi Goldberg film about a loose-moraled singer who witnesses a mob crime and is sent into hiding in a convent, White played one of the many naive nuns whose eyes are opened to the excitement of the outside world. “She was just so freaking earnest in her joy, and it wasn’t for a joke,” Board said. “It was honest.”

    At the end of 2016, White had the rare opportunity to create a character from scratch in the Arvada Center’s just-completed new musical I’ll Be Home for Christmas. It is written by Kenn McLaughlin and longtime Arvada Center resident Music Director David Nehls, who has been developing the piece from scratch over the past several years. And from the first iteration of the show, White has been cast to play an actor in the Bright family’s 1950s televised variety show. But now it’s the Vietnam era, and the Brights’ grown-up, all-American son is coming home from war to appear in the family’s annual Christmas special. There’s tension on the set, and White is there to break it.

    Her character’s name is Carol Marie, but think Rose Marie in The Dick Van Dyke Show - with a killer voice. White is given two songs that humanize the loneliness of a single, middle-aged woman of that era at Christmas. But she's playing a character-within-a-character. Carol Marie, the actor on the show, turns out to be a happily married mother.

    To top off White's year, she was nominated in July for a Colorado Theatre Guild Henry Award for her work in 2015's Irving Berlin's White Christmas.

    “In my humble opinion, Sharon Kay has some of the most sound, organic comic timing I’ve ever seen,” said Board. “And the amazing thing is, she was never taught comedy. Never once. It’s all her.”

    Sharon Kay White/At a glance

    • Hometown: Gilroy, Calif.
    • Home now: Denver
    • High school: Gilroy High School
    • College: Bachelor's of Science degree in Textile Science and Polymer Chemistry from the UC-Davis (California)
    • Coming up: She will be playing Elsa Maxwell in Cherry Creek Theatre's Red, Hot and Cole from Jan. 19-Feb. 26 in the Mizel Arts and Culture Center's Pluss Theatre
    ABOUT THE TRUE WEST AWARDS
    The True West Awards, now in their 16th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2016 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist. His daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    THE 2016 TRUE WEST AWARDS
    Day 1: Jada Suzanne Dixon
    Day 2: Robert Michael Sanders
    Day 3: After Orlando
    Day 4: Michael Morgan
    Day 5: Beth Beyer
    Day 6: Patrick Elkins-Zeglarski
    Day 7: donnie l. betts
    Day 8: Night of the Living Dead
    Day 9: The Killer Kids of Miscast
    Day 10: Jason Sherwood
    Day 11: Leslie O'Carroll and Steve Wilson
    Day 12: Jonathan Scott-McKean
    Day 13: Jake Mendes
    Day 14: Charles R. MacLeod
    Day 15: Patty Yaconis
    Day 16: Daniel Langhoff
    Day 17: Colorado Shakespeare Festival costumers
    Day 18: Miriam Suzanne
    Day 19: Yolanda Ortega
    Day 20: Diana Ben-Kiki
    Day 21: Jeff Neuman
    Day 22: Gabriella Cavallero
    Day 23: Matthew Campbell
    Day 24: Sharon Kay White
    Day 25: John Hauser
    Day 26: Lon Winston
    Day 27: Jason Ducat
    Day 28: Sam Gregory
    Day 29: Warren Sherrill
    Day 30: The Women Who Run Theatre in Boulder
    Theatre Person of the Year Billie McBride
  • All our photos from the 2016 Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2016
    2016 Henry Awards
    Photos from the Colorado Theatre Guild’s 2016 Henry Awards ceremony held July 18 at the PACE Center in Parker. To see more photos, click the arrow on the image above. All photos may be downloaded and shared for free, with proper credit. Click on any photo to download.

    Photos by John Moore and Brian Landis Folkins for the DCPA NewsCenter. To read our full report from the Henry Awards, click here.

    Watch our 2016 Memoriam video

    Recent NewsCenter coverage of the Henry Awards:
    2016 Henry Awards a triumph for Theatre Aspen, Rabbit Hole
    Our video coverage of the Henry Awards (more to come)
    Preview: Henry Awards welcome Theatre Aspen to the party
    DCPA leads hugely expanded pool of 2016 Henry Award nominees
    Paige Price: From Broadway to Sex With Strangers

    A Henry Awards co-host Steven J. Burge. Phto by Brian Landis Folkins, BLF Photography.
    Henry Awards co-host Steven J. Burge. Photo by Brian Landis Folkins, BLF Photography.
  • Video Playlist: Our 2016 Henry Awards coverage

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2016


    The fifth in our series of videos from the 2016 Henry Awards brings you the names of every winner being called out, and highlights from their acceptance speeches.

    The Colorado Theatre Guild's Henry Awards were held on July 18, 2016, at the PACE Center in Parker. More videos will be added to this special YouTube playlist.

    Videos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Watch our montage of performance highlights

    Watch Deborah Persoff accept the Lifetime Achievement Award

    Watch Melody Duggan accept the Theatre Educator Award

    Watch our 2016 Memoriam video


    Recent NewsCenter coverage of the Henry Awards:

    2016 Henry Awards a triumph for Theatre Aspen, Rabbit Hole
    Preview: Henry Awards welcome Theatre Aspen to the party
    DCPA leads hugely expanded pool of 2016 Henry Award nominees
    Paige Price: From Broadway to Sex With Strangers
    DCPA leads way with 11 2015 Henry Awards

    Our complete photo gallery from the Henry Awards:

    2016 Henry Awards

    Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. To see more, click on the forward arrow above.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zaXig4EKD8I?list=PLexX4Wflzocm3436-lTxQoy5ppYZSH9Px" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>Kevin Copenhaver accepts his Henry Award for Outstanding Ciostume Design for the DCPA Theatre Company's 'Sweeney Todd.' Photo by Brian Landis Folkins.
  • Henry Awards a triumph for Theatre Aspen, 'Rabbit Hole'

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2016

    ragtimePerformance Now presents a powerful medley from "Ragtime" at Monday's Henry Awards. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. 


    Here’s a sure sign of growth: Last year, Theatre Aspen was nominated for eight Colorado Theatre Guild Henry Awards. This year, it won eight.

    In an uncommonly well-spread evening celebrating statewide achievement in Colorado theatre, two upstarts clearly emerged: Theatre Aspen, which won both the Outstanding Musical for Cabaret and the prestigious Outstanding Season by a Company awards; and Vintage Theatre, which swept nearly all of the acting awards for the family drama Rabbit Hole.

    Rabbit Hole, which won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for David Lindsay-Abaire, is the wrenching story of a family coming to grips with the death of a child. The Vintage staging, directed by Bernie Cardell, was named Outstanding Drama, Outstanding Ensemble, Outstanding Supporting Actor (Marc Stith) and Outstanding Actress (Maggy Stacy - who was also nominated in that category for her performance in The Edge’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?)

    While the annual Henry Awards often turn into landslides, this year the 25 competitive awards were distributed among 11 different companies and 13 different shows. That still left a number of the state's most prestigious companies on the sidelines this year, including the Arvada Center, Curious Theatre Company, Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Phamaly Theatre Company, BDT Stage and Creede Repertory Theatre.

    The evening drew many standing ovations - none more fervent than for Performance Now's medley from Ragtime. It culminated with the lines "We'll never get to heaven till we reach that day," which took on added significance given recent tragic events in America.

    Perhaps the biggest upset of the night? Three hours and not a single reference to the Broadway phenomenon Hamilton.

    Jonathan Farwell, otherwise known as “The Force of Fort Collins,” won his second Outstanding Actor Henry Award – since turning 80. Seriously. Farwell won in 2013 for his performance as Salieri in OpenStage’s Amadeus. On Monday, now 84 and legally blind, Farwell won his second Henry, for Bas Bleu Theatre Company’s The Outgoing Tide. Farwell delivered a fully fleshed and close-to-the-bone portrayal of a man whose encroaching Alzheimer’s disease steels his determination to control the final course of his life. Farwell, who also won a True West Award for his performance in The Outgoing Tide, was The Fantasticks’ first-ever El Gallo, back when the enduring musical was a college workshop project.

    "The joy is in the doing, and in the sharing of the work," said Farwell, who cited encouragement from a young and not-yet Dame Maggie Smith for propelling him on his acting journey.

    Outstanding Actress in a Play went to Missy Moore, who played a newly tamed, just-released jailbird in The Edge Theatre's Getting Out. That broke a streak of two straight wins by Emma Messenger, who was again nominated in the category for The Edge's Exit Strategies.

    The DCPA Theatre Company led all companies with 27 nominations and won five Henry Awards, including four for its DeVotchKa-infused staging of Sweeney Todd. Linda Mugleston, who made the human pie-maker Mrs. Lovett seem downright motherly, was named Outstanding Actress in a musical. Other DCPA winners included Director Kent Thompson, Costume Designer Kevin Copenhaver and Scenic Designer Jim Kronzer for Sweeney Todd; as well as Sound Designer Craig Breitenbach for Tribes.

    (The Henry Awards split the four design categories, honoring winners in both larger budget and smaller-budget productions. The dividing line between tiers is whether the presenting company’s annual budget is above or below $1.2 million.)

    Theatre Aspen won five Henrys for Cabaret, including Jon Peterson as Outstanding Actor in a Musical, and Lori Wilner as Outstanding Supporting Actress. Peterson described Theatre Aspen as "a magical kindom of theatre."

    Like Theatre Aspen, the Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre of Grand Lake won its first competitive Henry Award when Steven Sitzman was named Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical for “The Addams Family.”

    2016 Henry Awards memoriam video:


    Video by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Lifetime Achievement Award: Deborah Persoff

    deborah-persoff-henry-awards-rabbit-holeThe winner of the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award was Deborah Persoff, who was part of Vintage Theatre’s winning Rabbit Hole ensemble. Persoff was born in Philadelphia to a composer father and pianist mother. She moved to Colorado in 1969. Her first show was at the Changing Scene.

    "I was the fifth narrator on the left, which meant that I sat in a chair, opened a book and just babbled. Everyone who paid their dues in those days had to work at the Changing Scene," Persoff, who later player Glinda in the Bonfils Theatre’s 1971 production of The Wizard of Oz, said in a previous interview.

    In recent years, Persoff has played Maude in Harold and Maude, Edith Bouvier Beale in Grey Gardens and a 91-year-old Communist in Miners Alley Playhouse’s 4000 Miles. She has worked for most every theatre company in the metro area and beyond, and has been president of Vintage Theatre’s Board of Directors since 2013.

    “I want to have a bumper sticker that says. ‘Got gas. Will work,’ " she said. "I feel like the border patrol. I do all four sides of the I-25 corridor. I’ll go anywhere.”  

    Persoff took seven years away from acting to raise her two sons. And while women are often told the best roles tend to dry up with age, Persoff says instead, “I’ve been lucky. I don’t find that to be true in Denver. The roles are terrific. I’ve been working in a city that is just abounding with fabulous women, and it’s just been a joy to watch this city grow and grow up.”

    While presenting the award, Vintage Theatre founder Craig Bond said, "to receive this award is to work with legends of the community."

    Persoff was one of many who took time to honor the late Miners Alley Playhouse Artistic Director Brenda Billings, who died in April of a sudden brain aneurysm. She was known for her motto, "Be Brave." Said Persoff: Those are not just two words.

    "Keep shining," she told the crowd, "because dreams have no expiration date." 

    Denver Actors Fund going statewide

    Other special Henry Awards went to the Denver Actors Fund, which in three years has raised $117,000 to support artists (on stage on off) facing situational medical need. In accepting the Colorado Theatre Guild’s Community Impact Award, President Will Barnette announced the non-profit’s breaking news that it is expanding eligibility to theatre artists statewide.

    Denver East’s legendary and recently retired Melody Duggan was named Theatre Educator of the Year.

    The evening was again hosted by GerRee Hinshaw and Steve J. Burge and directed by Jim Hunt and Josh Hartwell.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.  

    2015-2016 COLORADO THEATRE GUILD HENRY AWARDS

    1-theatre-aspen-season-henry-awardsOUTSTANDING SEASON FOR A THEATRE COMPANY
    Theatre Aspen



    2-rabbit-hole-playOUTSTANDING PLAY
    Rabbit Hole
    Vintage Theatre Productions
    Bernie Cardell, Director

     

     



    3-theatre-aspen-musical-henry-awardsOUTSTANDING MUSICAL
    Cabaret
    Theatre Aspen
    Mark Martino, Director; Eric Alsford, Musical Director

     

     



    4-sarna-lapine-henry-awardsDIRECTION OF A PLAY
    Sarna Lapine
    Other Desert Cities
    Theatre Aspen



    5-eric-alsford-5-henry-awardsMUSICAL DIRECTION
    Eric Alsford
    Cabaret
    Theatre Aspen

     

     



    6-kent-thompson-henry-awardsDIRECTION OF A MUSICAL
    Kent Thompson
    Sweeney Todd
    DCPA Theatre Company

     

     



    7-rembrandyt-room-henry-awardsOUTSTANDING NEW PLAY
    The Rembrandt Room
    Buntport Theater

     

     



    8-missy-moore-henry-awardsLEAD ACTRESS IN A PLAY
    Missy Moore
    Getting Out
    The Edge Theater

     

     



    9-jonathan-farwell-henry-awardsLEAD ACTOR IN A PLAY
    Jonathan Farwell
    The Outgoing Tide
    Bas Bleu Theatre Company


     

    10-linda-mugleston-henry-awardsLEAD ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
    Linda Mugleston
    Sweeney Todd
    DCPA Theatre Company

     



    11-jon-peterson-cabaret-henry-awardsLEAD ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
    Jon Peterson
    Cabaret
    Theatre Aspen

     

     



    12-ensemble-rabbit-holeENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
    Rabbit Hole
    Vintage Theatre Productions

     

     



    13-maggie-stacy-henry-awardsSUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A PLAY
    Maggy Stacy
    Rabbit Hole
    Vintage Theatre Productions

     

     



    14-marc-stith-henry-awardsSUPPORTING ACTOR IN A PLAY
    Marc Stith
    Rabbit Hole
    Vintage Theatre Productions

     

    15-lori-wilner-henry-awardsSUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
    Lori Wilner
    Cabaret
    Theatre Aspen

     



    16-steven-sitzman-henry-awardsSUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
    Steven Sitzman
    The Addams Family
    Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre

     

     



    17-mark-martino-choreo-henry-awardsCHOREOGRAPHY
    Mark Martino
    Cabaret
    Theatre Aspen

     

     



    18-craig-breitenbach-henry-awardsSOUND DESIGN (Larger companies)
    Craig Breitenbach
    Tribes
    DCPA Theatre Company

     

     



    19-jonathan-scott-mckean-henry-awardsSOUND DESIGN (Smaller companies)
    Jonathan Scott-Mckean
    Pump Boys and Dinettes
    Miners Alley Playhouse

     

     



    20-paul-black-henry-awardsLIGHTING DESIGN (Larger companies)
    Paul Black
    Peter and the Starcatcher
    Theatre Aspen

     

     



    21-shannon-mckinney-henry-awardsLIGHTING DESIGN (Smaller companies)
    Shannon McKinney
    Faith
    Local Theatre Company

     

     



    22-kevin-copenhaver-henry-awardsCOSTUME DESIGN (Larger companies)
    Kevin Copenhaver
    Sweeney Todd
    DCPA Theatre Company

     

     



    23-cindy-franke-henry-awardsCOSTUME DESIGN (Smaller companies)
    Cindy Franke
    Ragtime: The Musical
    Performance Now

     

     



    24-jim-kronzer-henry-awardsSCENIC DESIGN (Larger companies)
    Jim Kronzer
    Sweeney Todd
    DCPA Theatre Company

     

     



    25-michael-r-duran-henry-awardsSCENIC DESIGN (Smaller companies)
    Michael R. Duran
    The Explorers Club
    Lone Tree Arts Center



    SPECIAL AWARDS

    26-deborah-persoff-henry-awardsLIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
    Deborah Persoff

     

     



    Denver Actors FundCOMMUNITY IMPACT AWARD
    Denver Actors Fund

     

     



    27-melody-duggan-henry-awardsTHEATRE EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR
    Melody Duggan, Denver East High School

     


    Recent NewsCenter coverage of the Henry Awards: 
    Henry Awards welcome Theatre Aspen to the party
    DCPA leads hugely expanded pool of 2016 Henry Award nominees
    Paige Price: From Broadway to Sex With Strangers
    DCPA leads way with 11 2015 Henry Awards


  • Henry Awards welcome Theatre Aspen to the party

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2016
    theatre-aspen-cabaret-photo-by-jeremy-swanson3ae8c947b2b24071ace7b9cd8fccbff9

    Theatre Aspen's 'Cabaret' is the most-nominated musical of the year in Colorado theatre, with 11 Henry Award nods. The winners will be announced Monday night, July 18.  Photo by Jeremy Swanson.

    The Colorado Theatre Guild expanded in 2012 to make companies beyond the metro area eligible for its annual Henry Awards, which celebrate overall excellence by member companies. And ever since, Theatre Aspen Artistic Director Paige Price has crossed her fingers and hoped: “Maybe this will be our year.”

    2016 is looking like Theatre Aspen’s year. What with 25 nominations for three of its four offerings last summer: Cabaret, Other Desert Cites and Peter and the Starcatcher.  That’s second only to the 27 nominations for the DCPA Theatre Company.

    “I was in a board meeting when we got word of the nominations,” Price said. “I was sitting there counting them up and I couldn’t believe it. I felt like Sally Field. I definitely feel more welcome to the party now.”

    Theatre Aspen, located 160 miles southwest of Denver, has been presenting Broadway-quality summer repertory theatre in the idyllic setting of the Rio Grande Park for much of its 33 years, and with a roster of Broadway alumni including Tony Award nominee Beth Malone. But other than a special nod as the state’s outstanding regional theatre company of 2009, Theatre Aspen has yet to win an actual Henry Award.

    That seems all but certain to change tonight. The most-nominated musical of the year is Theatre Aspen's Cabaret, with 11, and the most-honored play is Other Desert Cities, with eight.

    “This acknowledgement is nothing short of huge for our entire organization,” Price said. “It’s fun to let people know that we are playing in the same ballpark with the Denver Center. And we have been saying that it in every curtain speech since the nominations came out.”

    That Theatre Aspen performs in a tented theatre in a park may give potential audiences the wrong impression about what kind of theatergoing experience they are in for there. “People hear we are in a park, and often they don’t even think we have a roof,” Price said. “But when they walk in, they see that it’s like walking into any studio theatre off-Broadway – except that the walls wobble with the wind.

    “What I tell people is that if you could take Broadway and shrink-wrap it - that’s the caliber of theatre we offer.”

    Sex With Strangers: Read our profile of Paige Price

    The Hurst Theatre, with a capacity of less than 200, makes for an unlikely home for Broadway musicals and intense dramas. Audiences experience stories in extreme close-up and with great emotional immediacy.

    “It’s really in-your-face theatre,” Price said, “and our audiences respond to that.”

    While Cabaret has been around for nearly 40 years, Theatre Aspen presented the recent Broadway revival that Price says is much darker and deeper than people remember. And Jon Robin Baitz’s Other Desert Cities is a brutal family drama that centers on a daughter who returns home with news she is publishing a divisive family memoir focusing on the suicide of her late brother.

    “I think Other Desert Cities really spoke to the people of this community,” Price said. “It was both the polarity of political views here, combined with the very real problem of suicide in mountain towns. I know some of our patrons were uncomfortable – which is a good thing.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    2016 was not only a transformational year for Price as Theatre Aspen’s Artistic Director but also as an actor herself. Price has several Broadway credits but had not performed in eight years when she was cast in Curious Theatre’s Denver staging of Laura Eason’s Sex with Strangers. That’s a two-person play for which Price and Michael Kingsbaker earned a Henry Award nomination as Outstanding Ensemble. And Price has the DCPA Theatre Company’s production of Theresa Rebeck’s world-premiere play The Nest to thank for it.

    “While I was watching that play at the Denver Center, I had an epiphany,” she said. “I was seeing all those wonderful actors just going at it with all they had, and I said to myself, ‘This is exactly what I’ve been missing in my life.’ Sometimes you just have to jump off a new cliff, and after eight years of not doing that, it was important for me to tap into the part of me that makes me click as an artist.”


    theatre-aspen-other-desert-cities-photo-by-jeremy-swanson
    Theatre Aspen's 'Other Desert Cities' is the most-nominated play of the year, with eight  Henry Award nods. Photo by Jeremy Swanson.

    Here’s more of our conversation with Paige Price: 

    John Moore: When did you start to sense things were changing as far as the outside perception of Theatre Aspen?

    Paige Price: We didn’t really hit our stride until we decided to do Les Misérables in 2013. That was a seminal year for us. The Broadway cast was something like 28, and we were given the opportunity to explore how it might look in a much more intimate setting, with a cast of only 18. Until then, we had been doing the kind of shows you would expect for the size and scope of the theatre we are in. But with Les Misérables, the proximity to the actors delighted our audiences.

    John Moore: What impression do you hope your 25 Henry Award nominations will have, both on Denver actors and audiences?

    Paige Price: I hope the actors in Denver will be more interested in coming up here and working. And for potential audiences, we have added more matinees to make it easier for people in Denver to make a day trip and still get home at a reasonable hour.

    John Moore: So you also have been nominated for your performance in Sex with Strangers at Curious Theatre. It’s been an ongoing controversy within the Henrys as to whether two people should constitute a true ensemble. What are your thoughts on that issue?

    Paige Price: I thought it was an interesting and flattering way of looking at that show because I don’t think one person works without the other. I don’t know. I think you could make the case that every show is an ensemble effort. But that’s the judges’ perview.  

    John Moore: What does Theatre Aspen have in store for the audience at Monday’s Henry Awards?

    Paige Price: Jon Peterson will be performing a song from Cabaret. It will be a great way to underscore what we do here at Theatre Aspen, and give people a taste of the quality of the actors who come and perform for us. I am really looking forward to it. Feeling like we are part of the larger community is very important for us.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.


    Theatre Aspen's 2016 Henry Award nominations:
    Outstanding Season for a Theatre Company

    Other Desert Cities
    Outstanding Production of a Play
    Outstanding Direction of a Play: Sarna Lapine
    Outstanding Ensemble Performance
    Outstanding Actress in a Play: Lori Wilner
    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play: Curran Connor, Jack Wetherall
    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play: Peggy J. Scott
    Outstanding Scenic Design: Mikiko Suzuki MacAdams

    Cabaret
    Outstanding Production of a Musical
    Outstanding Direction of a Musical: Mark Martino
    Outstanding Musical Direction: Eric Alsford
    Outstanding Choreography: Mark Martino
    Outstanding Ensemble Performance
    Outstanding Actor in a Musical: Jon Peterson
    Outstanding Actress in a Musical: Kirsten Wyatt
    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical: Richard Vida
    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical: Lori Wilner
    Outstanding Lighting Design: Paul Black
    Outstanding Sound Design: David Thomas

    Peter and the Starcatcher
    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical: Michelle Coben
    Outstanding Costume Design: Annabel Reader
    Outstanding Lighting Design: Paul Black
    Outstanding Scenic Design: Paul Black
    Outstanding Sound Design: David Thomas

    2016 Henry Awards: Ticket information
    6 p.m. Monday, July 18
    PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Avenue, Parker, MAP IT
    Tickets: $23 for CTG members, $30 non-members or $50 VIP. Tickets are available at  parkerarts.org, or by calling 303-805-6800. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door for $35

    Recent NewsCenter coverage of the Henry Awards: 
    DCPA leads hugely expanded pool of 2016 Henry Award nominees
    Paige Price: From Broadway to Sex With Strangers
    DCPA leads way with 11 2015 Henry Awards

  • DCPA leads hugely expanded pool of Henry Award nominees

    by John Moore | Jul 26, 2016


    Actors Andrew Pastides, Kate Finch and Tad Cooley are all nominated for Colorado Theatre Guild Henry Awards for the DCPA Theatre Company's 'Tribes.' Photo by Addams Visual Communications. 


    The guest list for the Colorado Theatre Guild's annual Henry Awards party just got a lot bigger. How much bigger? The list of nominations released this morning includes 175 honorees, up from 116 last year. That's an increase of 51 percent.
     
    This year there are seven nominees in every category. So while your chances of landing a Henry Award nomination just went way up ... your chances of winning just dropped to about 14 percent.

    For the third straight year, the DCPA Theatre Company leads all companies with 27 Henry Award nominations, including best season. Theatre Aspen follows with 25 - by far its greatest Henry Awards acknowledgement after years of presenting Broadway-quality productions in relative anonymity. The Arvada Center is next with 15, followed by the rising Edge Theatre with 10 and Vintage Theatre with nine. 

    The most-nominated musical of the year is Theatre Aspen's Cabaret, with 11, followed by the DCPA's DeVotchKa-infused take on Sweeney Todd with 10, and Performance Now's Ragtime with seven. Among plays, Theatre Aspen again led the way with eight nominations for Other Desert Cities, followed by Vintage Theatre's Rabbit Hole with seven and the DCPA's Tribes with six.

    Emma Messenger, winner of Outstanding Actress in a play two years running, will go for the Triple Crown after being nominated a third straight year for her True West Award-winning work in The Edge Theatre's world premiere of Exit Strategies.

    Maggy Stacy. Henry Awards
    Maggy Stacy in the Edge Theatre's 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' Rachel D. Graham Photography.
     

    Maggy Stacy pulled off the rare feat of being nominated twice in the same acting category, for her daring supporting work in both the Edge Theatre's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Vintage Theatre's Rabbit Hole.

    The DCPA's acting nominations were spread out among several shows, with nods going to Andrew Pastides, Kate Finch and hard-of-hearing actor Tad Cooley for Tribes; Robert Petkoff and Linda Mugleston for Sweeney Todd, Carolyn Holding for As You Like It; and C. David Johnson for All The Way. Directing nods went to Kent Thompson (Sweeney Todd) and Anthony Powell (All the Way), as well as Gregg Coffin for Musical Direction (Sweeney Todd).

    The Colorado Theatre Guild is a statewide advocacy group, and the expansion of nominations is its announced intention to spread more bounty to more companies throughout the state. The strategy appears to have worked. The number of Colorado companies that received at least one nomination grew from 25 to 31, with honored companies ranging from Colorado Springs to Dillon to Aspen to Creede.

    But because the Guild already splits the four design categories into two tiers determined by companies' annual overall operating budgets, the expansion of nominees tends to benefit the state's largest theatre companies most. That's because only seven companies have annual budgets above the $1.2 million threshhold and therefore are considered Tier I: The DCPA, Arvada Center, Creede Repertory Theatre, Curious Theatre, Theatre Aspen, Colorado Shakespeare Festival and Colorado Springs TheatreWorks. The expansion of the tiered pools from four to seven nominees in each category means only those seven companies were eligible for the 28 available nominations in the Tier I technical categories.

    This year's triple nominees are Theatre Aspen's multitalented Paul Black, who was cited for lighting Cabaret and Peter and the Starcatcher, as well as his Starcatcher scenic design. Lighting designer Shannon McKinney pulled off a rare feat, earning lighting nominations for three different companies: The Arvada Center's Death Takes a Holiday, the DCPA's Tribes and Local Theater Company's Faith.

    Double nominees from the DCPA include Scenic Designer Lisa Orzolek (Tribes and The Nest); Costume Designer Kevin Copenhaver (DCPA's Sweeney Todd and Lone Tree's The Explorer's Club); and Sound Designer Craig Breitenbach (DCPA's Tribes and Phamaly Theatre Company's Cabaret). 

    Other double nominees include double-dutying Directors and Choreographers Kelly Van Oosbree (Performance Now's Ragtime, The Musical) and Mark Martino (Theatre Aspen's Cabaret). Also: Director Gavin Mayer for the Arvada Center's musical Irving Berlin's White Christmas and play The Mountaintop; funnyman Dave Shirley's Voddville comedy landed him nominations for New Play and Sound Design; also Colorado Shakespeare Festival Costumer Hugh Hanson (Much Ado About Nothing and Wittenberg); perennial Costume Design honoree Linda Morken (Town Hall Arts Center's Violet and BDT Stage's Peter and the Starcatcher); Scenic Designer Amy Campion (BDT Stage's The Addams Family and Peter and the Starcatcher); and Theatre Aspen Sound Designer David Thomas (Peter and the Starcatcher and Cabaret).

    A fun little nomination battle bubbled up between two productions of Irving Berlin's White Christmas: The Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center ultimately edged out the Arvada Center, five nods to four.

    Every year comes with its share of surprises and disappointments, and this year the expansion of nominations clearly did no favors to the Curious Theatre Company, which received only two nominations, both for Sex With Strangers. Denver's premier off-Broadway theatre company fully adopted the radical concept of ongoing serial storytelling last year (meaning trilogies), but only three Curious Theatre offerings have now landed Henry Award nominations over the past three seasons. Another apparent snub was to the rock-solid Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, which has now only received two nominations in the past two years. This past season included the True West Award-winning Outside Mullingar and a critically praised Cyrano, but only Ideation was recognized this year, for Outstanding Play and Direction.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    Established in 2006, the Henry Awards honor outstanding achievement in Colorado theatre, and also serve as the Guild's annual fundraising event. The awards are named for longtime local theatre producer Henry Lowenstein.

    To be eligible for Henry Awards consideration, a presenting company must be a dues-paying member of the Colorado Theatre Guild. Shows are adjudicated throughout the year by a team of about 45 statewide theatre reporters, educators and assigned judges who score each show in all categories using a 50-point scale. A show must have been seen by six adjudicators in order to be eligible. (Next year, that number will go down to five.) The total number of shows eligible for 2015-16 Henry Award consideration totaled 196, up from 172 two years ago.

    The 2016 Henry Awards, which will take place on Monday, July 18, are moving this year to the PACE Center, located in Parker, Colorado. Tickets are now onsale.

    Cabaret Theatre Aspen. Photo by Jeremy Swanson.
    Theatre Apen is the most-nominated Colorado production of 2015-16 with 11 Henry Award nods. Photo by Jeremy Swanson.


     2015-16 COLORADO THEATRE GUILD HENRY AWARD NOMINATIONS:

    Outstanding Season for a Theatre Company
    Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Aurora Fox Arts Center
    Buntport Theater
    DCPA Theatre Company
    The Edge Theater Company
    Theatre Aspen
    Vintage Theatre Productions

     Outstanding Production of a Play
    "All the Way," DCPA Theatre Company, Anthony Powell, Director
    "Equus," The Avenue Theater, Warren Sherrill, Director
    "Ideation," Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, Stephen Weitz, Director
    “Other Desert Cities,” Theatre Aspen, Sara Lapine, Director
    “Rabbit Hole,” Vintage Theatre Productions,  Bernie Cardell, Director
    "The Rembrandt Room," Buntport Theater, Buntport Theater, Director
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," The Edge Theater Company, Rick Yaconis, Director

    Outstanding Production of a Musical
    "The Big Bang," Spotlight Theatre Company, Katie Mangett, Director; Blake Nawa'a, Musical Direction
    "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen, Mark Martino, Director; Eric Alsford, Musical Direction
    "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Rod Lansberry, Director; David Nehls, Musical Direction
    "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre, Jessica Jackson, Director; Joe Montelione, Musical Direction
    "Jekyll and Hyde," Aurora Fox Arts Center, El Armstrong, Director; Martha Yordy, Musical Direction
    "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now Theatre Company & Lakewood Cultural Center, Kelly Van Oosbree, Director; Eric Weinstein, Musical Direction
    "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company, Kent Thompson, Director; Gregg Coffin, Musical Direction

    Outstanding Direction of a Play
    Bernie Cardell, "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Buntport Theater, "The Rembrandt Room," Buntport Theater
    Sarna Lapine, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen
    Gavin Mayer, "The Mountaintop," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Anthony Powell, "All the Way," DCPA Theatre Company
    Stephen Weitz, "Ideation," Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company
    Rick Yaconis, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" The Edge Theater Company

    Outstanding Direction of a Musical
    Bryce Alexander, "Cabaret," Phamaly Theatre Company
    Nathan Halvorson, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
    Rod A. Lansberry, "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Mark Martino, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Gavin Mayer, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Kent Thompson, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Kelly Van Oosbree, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now Theatre Company and Lakewood Cultural Center                                    

    Outstanding Musical Direction
    Eric Alsford, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Gregg Coffin, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Donna Kolpan Debreceni, "Violet," Town Hall Arts Center
    Jay Hahn, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
    Joe Montelione, "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre
    David Nehls, "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Eric Weinstein, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now and Lakewood Cultural Center                           

    Outstanding Choreography
    Piper Lindsay Arpan, "Catch Me If You Can," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    Mary Ripper Baker and Nathan Halvorson, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
    Reace Daniel, "The Wild Party," Ignite Theatre
    Kitty Skillman Hilsabeck, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Mark Martino, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Nick Sugar, "West Side Story," Town Hall Arts Center
    Kelly Van Oosbree, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now and Lakewood Cultural Center                  

    Outstanding Actor in a Play
    Benjamin Bonenfant, "Henry V," Colorado Shakespeare Festival
    Tad Cooley, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company
    Jonathan Farwell, "The Outgoing Tide," Bas Bleu Theatre Company
    C. David Johnson, "All The Way," DCPA Theatre Company
    Andrew Pastides, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company     
    Ben Schrager, "Dancing Lessons," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    John Douglas Thompson, "Satchmo at the Waldorf," TheatreWorks

    Outstanding Actress in a Play
    Betty Hart, "The Mountaintop," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Carolyn Holding, "As You Like It," DCPA Theatre Company
    Erin Rollman, "The Rembrandt Room," Buntport Theater
    Billie McBride, "The Velocity of Autumn," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    Emma Messenger, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" The Edge Theater Company
    Missy Moore, "Getting Out," The Edge Theater Company
    Lori Wilner, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen

    Outstanding Actor in a Musical
    Daniel Langhoff, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now and Lakewood Cultural Center
    Jon Peterson, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Robert Petkoff, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Sean Thompson, "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre
    Danny Vaccaro, "La Cage Aux Folles," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    Joe Von Bokern, "The Big Bang," Spotlight Theatre Company
    Markus Warren, "South Pacific," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse

    Outstanding Actress in a Musical
    Mehry Eslaminia, "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre
    Lindsey Falduto, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now and Lakewood Cultural Center
    Ellen Kaye, "Violet," Town Hall Arts Center
    Linda Mugleston, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Marcia Ragonetti, "Sunset Boulevard," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Lauren Shealy, "Jekyll and Hyde," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    Kirsten Wyatt, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen

    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play
    Spencer Althoff, "Equus," The Avenue Theater
    Emory John Collinson, "Lonesome Hollow," Springs Ensemble Theatre
    Curran Connor, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen
    Steve Emily, "Lonesome Hollow," Springs Ensemble Theatre
    Rodney Lizcano, "Much Ado About Nothing," Colorado Shakespeare Festival
    Marc Stith, "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Jack Wetherall, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen

    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play
    Hannah Duggan, "Greetings from Camp Katabasis," Buntport Theater
    Kate Finch, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company
    Emma Messenger, "Exit Strategies," The Edge Theater Company
    Deborah Persoff, "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Peggy J. Scott, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen
    Maggy Stacy, "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Maggy Stacy, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" The Edge Theater Company

    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical
    Scott McLean, "Violet," Town Hall Arts Center
    Paul Page, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Mark Rubald, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
    Steven Sitzman, "The Addams Family," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    Colin Summers, "Ring of Fire," Midtown Arts Center
    Richard Vida, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Graham Ward, "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre

    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical
    Brittany Brook, "Ring of Fire," Midtown Arts Center
    Suzanne A. Champion, "The Addams Family," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    Michelle Coben, "Peter and the Starcatcher," Theatre Aspen
    Annie Dwyer, "South Pacific," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
    Sarah Philabaum, "The Addams Family," Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre
    Sharon Kay White, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Lori Wilner, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen

    Outstanding Ensemble Performance
    "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen, Mark Martino, Director; Eric Alsford, Musical Direction                               
    "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen, Sarna Lapine, Director
    "Pump Boys and Dinettes," Miners Alley Playhouse, Brenda Worley Billings, Director; Mitch Samu, Musical Direction                                     
    "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions,  Bernie Cardell, Director
    "Sex with Strangers," Curious Theatre Company, Christy Montour-Larson, Director
    "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company, Kent Thompson, Director; Gregg Coffin, Musical Direction
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," The Edge Theater Company, Rick Yaconis, Director

    Outstanding New Play or Musical
    "Fade" by Tanya Saracho, Directed by Jerry Ruiz, DCPA Theatre Company
    "Exit Strategies" by Jeff Neuman, Directed by Kate Marie Folkins, The Edge Theater Company
    "The Nest" by Theresa Rebeck, Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt, DCPA Theatre Company
    "The Rembrandt Room," by Buntport Theater, Directed by Buntport Theater
    "Reunion '85" by Susan Draus, David Larsen, and Cody Jamison Strand; Directed by David Larsen, Musical Direction by Chris Sargent; Lone Tree Arts Center
    "Uncle Jed's Barbershop" by Kenneth Grimes and David Wohl; Directed by Susan Einhorn, Musical Direction by Michael Williams; DreaMaker Productions           "Voddville" by Robert Dubac and Dave Shirley; Directed by Dave Shirley; The Avenue Theater                                                                                              

    (The Colorado Theatre Guild creates two categories for its technical awards, based upon production budgets.)

    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 1
    Denitsa Bliznakova, "As You Like It," DCPA Theatre Company
    Kevin Copenhaver, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Hugh Hanson, "Much Ado About Nothing," Colorado Shakespeare Festival
    Hugh Hanson, "Wittenberg," Colorado Shakespeare Festival
    Clare Henkel, "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Lex Liang, "Irving Berlin's White Christmas," Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
    Annabel Reader, "Peter and the Starcatcher," Theatre Aspen

    Outstanding Costume Design Tier 2
    Cindy Franke, "Ragtime, The Musical," Performance Now and Lakewood Cultural Center
    Kevin Copenhaver, "The Explorers Club," Lone Tree Arts Center
    Nikki Harrison, "Catch Me If You Can," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    Laura High, "Little Women," Aurora Fox Arts Center
    Laurie Klapperich, "Into the Woods," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
    Linda Morken, "Violet," Town Hall Arts Center
    Linda Morken, "Peter and the Starcatcher," BDT Stage

    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 1

    Seth Alison, "The Mountaintop," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Paul Black, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Paul Black, "Peter and the Starcatcher," Theatre Aspen
    Charles MacLeod, "All The Way," DCPA Theatre Company
    Shannon McKinney, "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Shannon McKinney, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company
    Kenton Yeager, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company          

    Outstanding Lighting Design Tier 2

    Chad Bonaker, "Rock of Ages," Midtown Arts Center
    Shannon Johnson, "South Pacific," Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
    Andrew Killion, "The Outgoing Tide," Bas Bleu Theatre Company
    Vance McKenzie, "The Big Bang," Spotlight Theater Company
    Shannon McKinney, "Faith," Local Theater Company
    Stephen D. Mazzeno, "Cabaret," Phamaly Theatre Company
    Brian Miller, "Outside Mullingar," OpenStage Theatre & Company

    Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 1
    Paul Black, "Peter and the Starcatcher," Theatre Aspen
    Jim Kronzer, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company
    Mikiko Suzuki MacAdams, "Other Desert Cities," Theatre Aspen
    Brian Mallgrave, "Death Takes a Holiday," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Robert Mark Morgan, "All The Way," DCPA Theatre Company
    Lisa Orzolek, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company
    Lisa Orzolek, "The Nest," DCPA Theatre Company

    Outstanding Scenic Design Tier 2

    Amy Campion, "The Addams Family," BDT Stage
    Amy Campion, "Peter and the Starcatcher," BDT Stage
    Douglas Clarke, "Rabbit Hole," Vintage Theatre Productions
    Michael R. Duran, "The Explorers Club," Lone Tree Arts Center
    Jared Grohs, "The Velocity of Autumn," Lake Dillon Theatre Company
    Lori Rosedahl, "Outside Mullingar," OpenStage Theatre & Company
    Kyle Scoggins, "Pump Boys and Dinettes," Miners Alley Playhouse

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 1
    Craig Breitenbach, "Tribes," DCPA Theatre Company
    Grant Evenson, "The Mountaintop," Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
    Jake K. Harbour, "Guys and Dolls," Creede Repertory Theatre
    Alex Ruhlin, "Sex with Strangers," Curious Theatre
    David Thomas, "Peter and the Starcatcher," Theatre Aspen
    David Thomas, "Cabaret," Theatre Aspen
    Zach Williamson, "Sweeney Todd," DCPA Theatre Company       

    Outstanding Sound Design Tier 2

    Curt Behm, "Violet," Town Hall Arts Center
    Craig Breitenbach, "Cabaret," Phamaly Theatre Company
    Brian Freeland, "The Explorers Club," Lone Tree Arts Center
    Jonathan Scott-McKean, "Pump Boys and Dinettes," Miners Alley Playhouse
    Grant Putney, "The Outgoing Tide," Bas Bleu Theatre Company
    Dave Shirley, "Voddville," Avenue Theater
    Wayne Kennedy, "Peter and the Starcatcher," BDT Stage

    SPECIAL AWARDS
    CTG Community Impact Award
    The Denver Actors Fund

    (Additional Special Awards including Lifetime Achievement will be announced in July.) 

    2016 Henry Awards: Ticket information
    6 p.m. Monday, July 18
    PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Avenue, Parker, MAP IT
    Tickets: $23 for CTG members, $30 non-members or $50 VIP. Tickets are available at  parkerarts.org, or by calling 303-805-6800. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door for $35.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter
  • Task force will explore changes to Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Aug 11, 2015



    The Colorado Theatre Guild today announced it will form a statewide task force to address ongoing questions and criticisms about the administration of its annual Henry Awards program.

    The 10-year-old Henrys celebrate achievement in Colorado theatre among its member companies. Under the present voting system, a team of about 45 volunteer judges evaluate shows in all creative categories using a 50-point scoring system. The top five in each category become the nominees, and the leading points-getter is the winner.

    If only it were that simple.

    Every awards show from the Oscars to the Tonys to the Westminster Dog Show engenders its share of carping. But as a small advocacy organization trying to administer a statewide awards program on a shoestring budget, the Henry Awards have long been vulnerable to vast communal grumbling. But by the time the awards ceremony takes place each July, the next judging season is already underway. That makes it nearly impossible to address and implement immediate changes.

    But CTG President Pat Payne said the Guild must act now.

    Pat Payne and Bill Wheeler“As an organization, we need to be listening to what is being said by our members,” Payne said. “We need to make sure we are doing whatever we can to present the most open and fair awards program we possibly can.”

    Payne has appointed self-starting local theatre reviewer Bill Wheeler of Colorado Springs to head the task force, which is expected to include 12 to 20 individuals from theatre companies large and small. The standing title on Wheeler’s home page, ironically enough, is “Reviews for Colorado stages … without all the drama.”

    Welcome to the Henry Awards, which is an annual emotional geyser. 

    (Photo: Pat Payne, left, and Bill Wheeler, right.)

    Much of the discontent stems from a basic lack of understanding about the process, more so than the process itself. Longstanding practical concerns have included how judges are chosen, how they are trained, and what are their qualifications and conflicts. Other lingering questions include how Guild staff determine the outcome of the prized “Outstanding Season” category, since judges don’t vote in that category.

    In the four design categories (costume, lighting, sound and scenic design), the Guild separates member companies into large and small tiers based on overall operating budgets. Questions include why budget was chosen as the prevailing criterion, and why $1.2 million was chosen as the dividing line between big and small. That leaves only four companies in the Tier I group, while the Guild has 115 member companies.

    Wheeler and his team will be asked to tackle these questions – and many more. And blowing up the present voting system and starting over is not off the table, Payne said.

    The task force’s recommendations will be expected in January, Payne said. “And the Board of Directors will then implement those they believe will take the Henry Awards to the next level,” said Wheeler, whose blog can be found at theatercolorado.blogspot.com. Payne said those recommendations that are adopted and can be immediately adoptable will be, while others will have to wait for the next awards cycle.

    “Our goal is to make the Henry Awards the best possible process for recognizing excellence in theater at all levels," Wheeler said. "We will be seeking input from all interested theater companies and individuals to help us accomplish that task.”

    Payne said Wheeler was chosen to lead the task force because he is an attorney, and because he is not affiliated with any one member company. "That makes him the wise, unbiased choice," Payne said.  

    At Payne’s direction, Wheeler is inviting targeted members of the theatre community to serve as full task-force members (including this writer). And the more contrarian, the better, Payne said. "We have to be willing to hear what the members of our community are really saying ... or what's the point?" That's why actor Margie Lamb, who spoke out about her concerns about the Henry Awards in a guest column for the DCPA NewsCenter ("Something here doesn't add up"), also has been invited. But Wheeler said any theatre company or individual who would like to contribute to the process will be welcome to do so, and can contact him at bilweeler@gmail.com.

    How is it done now?

    Under the present system, a show must be seen and evaluated by a minimum of six judges. The Guild succeeded in making a record 187 productions eligible for 2015 Henry Awards consideration, but the resulting nominations did nothing to stem longstanding questions about the system’s credibility. The Aurora Fox, Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, Colorado Shakespeare Festival and Creede Repertory Theatre were among those companies that did not garner a single nomination. That has some observers questioning how consistent the judges are as a body in their overall scoring. And the Colorado Shakespeare Festival’s nearly inevitable annual exclusion from Henry Award nominations has had officials there asking for years whether judges are either biased against classical work, or, more bluntly, aren’t skilled enough in the form to fairly judge it.

    The Henry Awards’ elusive climb to true credibility has been slow, but it hasn’t been from lack of trying. General manager Gloria Shanstrom, who oversees the awards program year-round, has implemented major changes throughout the first decade.

    “It is my hope that with the formation of this (task force), the community will understand the Guild's sincere desire to look for ways to improve the award process,” Shanstrom said. “They will be doing a lot of work over the next several months, and I look forward to hearing the results.”

    When the Henrys began in 2006, the awards were decided by a group of about seven professional critics who voted for their five personal favorites in each category, much like an Oscar voter filling out an Academy Award ballot. But that system overwhelmingly favored those shows the most critics saw, because of the greater potential for points. (You can't vote for a show you didn't see.) That led to annual landslides that, head-scratchingly, continue to this day under a completely different voting system. 

    In 2009, the last year under the old voting system, 72 percent of all nominations went to just six companies. In 2012, under the new judging system, more than 80 percent of all nominations went to the top six. So while the system has changed drastically, the imbalances have not.

    The Guild also responded to member complaints by separating designers into budget categories in 2011. And despite overwhelming logistical challenges, it finally managed to expand eligibility statewide in 2013.

    Change does not always lead to peace and resolution, however. Responding to one repeated suggestion, the Guild implemented a residency rule in 2007 that required all nominees be Colorado residents for at least six months of the year. DCPA Artistic Director Kent Thompson pulled his company out of awards consideration that year in protest, arguing passionately that where actors sleep is inconsequential when they are creating art for Colorado audiences. The Guild rescinded the residency rule in 2008, and the DCPA returned to the fold.

    In the end, the Henry Awards exist primarily as the Guild’s annual fundraiser. But the biggest challenge the Guild has yet to face is the perception that the organization only exists to administer the Henry Awards. Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center boss Scott RC Levy chose not to pay his dues last year, he said, “because I refuse to pay to play" - meaning he equates membership solely with Henry Awards eligibility. Earlier today, Levy said he has decided to pay the $80 membership fee for this season, but he remains cynical about the value of membership.

    New programming initiatives were announced at the most recent Henry Awards ceremony but, Levy said, until he sees them in action, "my concerns still remain."

    Payne, also artistic Director of the Cherry Creek Theatre Company, assumed the presidency in January 2014 acknowledging that the Guild had all but disappeared from public perception, with the exception of administering the Henry Awards. He knows the time is now to put up or shut up.

    "We are well aware of the feelings of many in the theatre community, and it is our responsibility to make sure we are serving our membership in the best way possible."

    THE 2015 AWARDS CEREMONY:


    Here are our photos from the Colorado Theatre Guild's 2015 Henry Awards ceremony held July 20 at the Arvada Center. Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA's NewsCenter. To download any photo for free, click on "View original Flickr" image and choose from a variety of download sizes.




    PEOPLE AND FACES:

    Here are our photos of people and faces at the Henry Awards. Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA's NewsCenter. To download any photo for free, click on "View original Flickr" image and choose from a variety of download sizes.


    Previous NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Henry Awards:
    Colorado Theatre Guild honors DCPA with 11 Henry Awards
    The Henry Awards: The complete list of nominations
    Video: 2015 Henry Award acceptance speeches
    Video: 2015 Henry Award performance highlights
    Videos: Our memorial tributes to departed artists in 2014-15
    Duck and cover: Gloria Shanstrom takes your Henry Awards questions
    Beth Malone, Colin Hanlon will perform at Henry Awards
    Guest essay by Margie Lamb: Something about the Henry Award doesn't add up


    Haly Johnson accepts the 2015 Henry Award for 'Night, Mother.' Photo by Brian Landis Folkins
    Haley Johnson accepts the 2015 Henry Award for 'Night, Mother" as Outstanding Play.  Photo by Brian Landis Folkins.
  • Video: 2015 Henry Award Acceptance Speeches

    by John Moore | Jul 28, 2015



    Here are short excerpts from acceptance speeches by recipients of the Colorado Theatre Guild's 2015 Henry Awards. The ceremony was held July 20 at the Arvada Center.

    It was a huge night for the DCPA's Billie McBride, who won three Henry Awards and presented another. She was honored for directing Vintage Theatre's 'Night Mother, which also won Outstanding Production of a Play. And she was named Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play for her work in the DCPA Theatre Company's world premiere play, Benediction. "Kent Thompson is a gentle and loving director," she says, "and it's just a beautiful play."

    In accepting the DCPA Theatre Company's Outstanding Season by a Company Award, DCPA President and CEO Scott Shiller told those attending the ceremony: "The work that you are creating day in and day out is the envy of the nation. The fact that the NEA has just said that 52 percent of everybody who lives in the state of Colorado comes to attend live theatrical events, compared to 36 or 38 percent everywhere else in the country, is remarkable. And it doesn't happen by accident. It happens because of the incredible storytellers who are here in this room. The DCPA is so honored to be a part of this theatrical community."

    You'll also see Beth Malone accept the Outstanding Actress in a Musical Award for her work in The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and Colin Hanlon accept The 12's award as Outstanding New Play or Musical. 

    To see performance highlights from the Henry Awards, click here.

    The director of the awards ceremony was Jim Hunt.

    Video by John Moore for the DCPA's NewsCenter.

    DCPA President and CEO Scott Shiller accepts the Theatre Company's Henry Award for Outstanding Season. Photo by John Moore.  DCPA President and CEO Scott Shiller accepts the Theatre Company's Henry Award for Outstanding Season by a Company. Photo by John Moore. 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Henry Awards:
    Colorado Theatre Guild honors DCPA with 11 Henry Awards
    The Henry Awards: The complete list of nominations
    Video: 2015 Henry Award performance highlights
    Videos: Our memorial tributes to departed artists in 2014-15
    Duck and cover: Gloria Shanstrom takes your Henry Awards questions
    Beth Malone, Colin Hanlon will perform at Henry Awards
    Guest essay by Margie Lamb: Something about the Henry Award doesn't add up
  • Photos: Colorado Theatre Guild's 2015 Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Jul 24, 2015
    THE AWARDS CEREMONY:

    Here are our photos from the Colorado Theatre Guild's 2015 Henry Awards ceremony held July 20 at the Arvada Center. Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA's NewsCenter. To download any photo for free, click on "View original Flickr" image and choose from a variety of download sizes.




    PEOPLE AND FACES:

    Here are our photos of people and faces at the Henry Awards. Photos by Brian Landis Folkins and John Moore for the DCPA's NewsCenter. To download any photo for free, click on "View original Flickr" image and choose from a variety of download sizes.

    Previous NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Henry Awards:
    Colorado Theatre Guild honors DCPA with 11 Henry Awards
    The Henry Awards: The complete list of nominations
    Video: Performances from the 2015 Henry Awards ceremony
    Videos: Our memorial tributes to departed artists in 2014-15
    Duck and cover: Gloria Shanstrom takes your Henry Awards questions
    Beth Malone, Colin Hanlon will perform at Henry Awards
    Guest essay by Margie Lamb: Something about the Henry Award doesn't add up

    They're actors! Haley Johnson and castmate Emma Messenger pretend to fight over the Henry Award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama. Photo by John Moore.
    They're actors! Haley Johnson and castmate Emma Messenger pretend to fight over the Henry Award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama. They were both nominated for ' 'Night, Mother.' Messenger won. The staging was named Outstanding Play of 2014-15. Photo by John Moore. 
  • Colorado Theatre Guild honors DCPA with 11 Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Jul 20, 2015
    'The Unsinkable Molly Brown' won seven Henry Awards in Monday night. Photo by Jennifer M. Koskinen.

    'The Unsinkable Molly Brown' won seven Henry Awards on Monday night. Photo by Jennifer M. Koskinen.


    The DCPA Theatre Company was rewarded for its commitment to developing new work for the American theatre by judges of the Colorado Theatre Guild's 10th annual Henry Awards on Monday night. The Theatre Company received 11 awards from among its 21 nominations, including Outstanding Season for the fifth time in the past eight years.

    "We count ourselves lucky to work in such a powerful and vibrant community of artists, where new and exciting work happens all across the state," new DCPA President and CEO Scott Shiller said in accepting the award. "Thank you for this honor, for your warm welcome into this community, and for everything you do on a daily basis to support theatre in the Rocky Mountain Region."

    All of the DCPA's awards were for new works: The 12, Benediction and its newly refreshed take on Broadway'S quintessential Colorado  musical, The Unsinkable Molly Brown.

    Molly Brown
    won seven Henry Awards, making it the most honored production of the Colorado theatre season. The production featured a new book and a significantly revised score. Its awards on Monday included Outstanding Musical, Outstanding Actress Beth Malone and Director Kathleen Marshall. 

    Malone, a Colorado native who recently was nominated for a Tony Award for her work in Fun Home the Musical, brought new layers to the woman most people outside Colorado only know as a brassy survivor of the USS Titanic disaster. "Malone plays Molly with tremendous energy, intelligence and verve," Westword theatre critic Juliet Wittman wrote last fall. 

    Kathleen MarshallMarshall (pictured right) is a  three-time Tony Award nominee and, now, a three-time Henry Award winner. She also was singled out for her Molly Brown choreography.

    "Creating this show was a complete joy from beginning to end, and receiving an award on top of it is really an embarrassment of riches," Marshall said through DCPA Associate Artistic Director Bruce Sevy. "It was a challenge and responsibility to bring the story of Margaret and JJ Brown, two legendary and iconic Colorado residents, to life. Our cast and creative team had a blast here in Denver."

    She also credited her cast and creative team, including writer Dick Scanlan, "a man whose vision, passion and dedication brought this entire reimagining of Meredith Willson’s classic American musical into being. He has an indomitable spirit, a generous nature and an infectious energy – just like Molly Brown."

    The Theatre Company's staging of the world premiere rock musical The 12, written by Robert Schenkkan and Neil Berg, was named Outstanding New Play or Musical. The 12 wonders what might have happened when Jesus' disciples went into hiding after his crucifixion.

    "In our 36-year history, we have presented 412 productions, of which 138 were world premieres, 159 were readings of new works in development and 27 were commissions," said Sevy. "When a world premiere wins an award, it makes us beyond proud."

    He read a message from Schenkkan, also the Puliter Prize-winning playwright of next season's All the Way, which read: "From the moment we arrived in Denver, we were knocked out by the professionalism, the passion and the strong sense of community. Plus, you have a pretty good ballteam."

    Billie McBrideBillie McBride (pictured right), who last year was presented with the Colorado Theatre Guild's Lifetime Achievement Award, came back with a monster year that was rewarded with three more Henrys on Monday. McBride, whose Broadway acting and stage-managing credits include Safe Sex and Torch Song Trilogy, made her DCPA Theatre Company debut in February playing straight-talking Willa in the world-premiere staging of Benediction.

    She also won a Henry Award Monday for directing the most honored play of the year: 'Night, Mother, for Vintage Theatre. McBride offered an unsympathetic and uncompromising take on Marsha Norman's tale of a middle-aged woman who calmly announces to her mother that she will commit suicide by night's end. Both of her actors were nominated for Outstanding Actress in a Play, and as the mother, Emma Messenger won.

    It was the second straight win for Messenger in that prestigious category, after having won in 2014 for her portrayal of a cripplingly cruel Irish mum in The Edge Theatre’s The Beauty Queen of Leenane.

    Among the first-time Henry Award winners were Benjamin Cowhick and Annie Dwyer. Cowhick (Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Play)  was utterly raw as as a hyperactive meth addict in A&A Productions' Good Television at the Aurora Fox. Dwyer performed for more than 20 years as a comic actor for the Heritage Square Music Hall, which was not a Colorado Theatre Guild member and thus, its actors were never eligible for Henry Awards. Since that famed venue closed last year, a wider audience is witnessing Dwyer's comic gifts. Dwyer's hilarious portrayal of Frau Bleucher earned her first Henry Award nomination and win, as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical.

    In all, 10 local companies earned at least one Henry Award on Monday, with the Arvada Center, BDT Stage and Vintage Theatre winning three each.

    The awards ceremony was again held at the Arvada Center and hosted by GerRee Hinshaw and Steven Burge, and directed by previous Colorado Theatre Guild Lifetime Achievement Award winner Jim Hunt. That award this year went to educator Jo Bunton Keel.

    The Henry Awards are named for legendary producer Henry Lowenstein, who brought more than 400 productions to the old Bonfils Theatre on East Colfax Avenue. This was the first year of the Henry Awards without Henry, and a video tribute was played to open the service featuring Cleo Parker Robinson, Bob Wells and John Ashton. Robinson told the story of how her father was hired as the theatre janitor over the objections of Bonfils patrons, and he went on to perform in dozens of shows, including a starring role in A Raisin in the Sun.

    It was a year of great loss in the theatre community, and a separate tribute video was played marking the passings of Shelly Bordas, Lloyd Norton, Kent Haruf, Bill Fancouer, Ray Viggiano, Michael (McKim) Daevid and DCPA President Randy Weeks. Those videos will be posted in the DCPA's NewsCenter in the coming days.

    The Henry Awards are a notoriously unpredictable affair from year to year. Last July, the DCPA Theatre Company earned a record 28 nominations and won three awards. This year's winners included Mike Hartman, who starred in all three chapters of the Theatre Company's adaptations of the Haruf's Plainsong Trilogy. He was named Outstanding Actor in a Play for his portrayal of a man dying with unfixable regrets in Benediction.

    “Thank you so much for this honor. I am incredibly blessed to have worked with Kent Haruf, (playwright) Eric Schmiedl, and Kent Thompson the cast and crew of all three of these wonderful rich Colorado stories," he said through the DCPA's Brianna Firestone.

    Two students from Durango High School represented The Bobby G Awards' 2014-15 Outstanding Musical by performing a medley from Les Misérables.

    More NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Henry Awards:
    Colorado Theatre Guild honors DCPA with 11 Henry Awards
    The Henry Awards: The complete list of nominations
    Photos: Our downloadable pictures from the Henry Awards ceremony
    Video: Performances from the 2015 Henry Awards ceremony
    Videos: Our memorial tributes to departed artists in 2014-15
    Duck and cover: Gloria Shanstrom takes your Henry Awards questions
    Beth Malone, Colin Hanlon will perform at Henry Awards
    Guest essay by Margie Lamb: Something about the Henry Award doesn't add up

    Still to come: Video showing acceptance speech highlights

    2014-2015 COLORADO THEATRE GUILD HENRY AWARDS

    DCPA Theatre CompanyOUTSTANDING SEASON FOR A THEATRE COMPANY
    Denver Center Theatre Company



    OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION OF A MUSICAL
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company
    Kathleen Marshall, Director; Michael Rafter, Musical Director



    OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION OF A PLAY
    'Night, Mother
    Vintage Theatre Productions
    Billie McBride, Director


    'The 12.' Photo by Jennifer M. Koskinen.

    OUTSTANDING NEW PLAY OR MUSICAL
    The 12
    DCPA Theatre Company
    Robert Schenkkan and Neil Berg



    OUTSTANDING DIRECTION OF A MUSICAL
    Kathleen Marshall
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company


    OUTSTANDING MUSICAL DIRECTION
    Michael Rafter
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company

     



    OUTSTANDING DIRECTION OF A PLAY
    Billie McBride
    'Night, Mother

    Vintage Theatre Productions



    Wayne Kennedy

    OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
    Wayne Kennedy
    Fiddler on the Roof
    BDT Stage



    Beth Malone

    OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
    Beth Malone
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company



    Mike Hartman

    OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A PLAY
    Mike Hartman
    Benediction
    DCPA Theatre Company

     



    Emma Messenger

    OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A PLAY
    Emma Messenger
    'Night, Mother
    Vintage Theatre Productions



    Annie Dwyer

    OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL
    Annie Dwyer
    Young Frankenstein
    Town Hall Arts Center



    Michael Wordly

    OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL
    Michael Wordly
    Memphis
    Midtown Arts Center, Fort Collins



    Benjamin CowhickOUTSTANDING

    SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A PLAY
    Benjamin Cowhick
    Good TV
    A & A Productions



    Billie McBride

    OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A PLAY
    Billie McBride
    Benediction
    DCPA Theatre Company



    Buntport ensemble.

    OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
    Middle Aged People Sitting in Boxes
    Buntport Theater Company



    OUTSTANDING CHOREOGRAPHY
    Kathleen Marshall
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company



    COSTUME DESIGN, TIER 1
    Paul Tazewell
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company



    OUTSTANDING COSTUME DESIGN, TIER 2
    Linda Morken
    Mary Poppins
    BDT Stage



    OUTSTANDING SCENIC DESIGN, TIER 1
    Brian Mallgrave
    She Loves Me
    Arvada Center



    OUTSTANDING SCENIC DESIGN, TIER 2
    Christopher Waller
    Jerusalem
    The Edge Theater



    OUTSTANDING SOUND DESIGN, TIER 1
    David Thomas
    Memphis
    Arvada Center



    OUTSTANDING SOUND DESIGN, TIER 2
    Ren Manley
    Jerusalem
    The Edge Theater



    OUTSTANDING LIGHTING DESIGN, TIER 1
    Don Holder
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown
    DCPA Theatre Company



    OUTSTANDING LIGHTING DESIGN, TIER 2
    Brett Maughan
    Mary Poppins
    BDT Stage



    SPECIAL AWARDS:

    Jo Bunton Keel

    LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN THEATRE
    Jo Bunton Keel



    Creede Repertory Theatre


    OUTSTANDING REGIONAL THEATRE
    Creede Repertory Theatre



    Lisa Cook


    OUTSTANDING STAGE MANAGEMENT
    Lisa Cook

  • Beth Malone, Colin Hanlon will perform at Henry Awards

    by John Moore | Jul 13, 2015

    Tony Award nominee and Colorado native Beth Malone is scheduled to perform at the Colorado Theatre Guild’s Henry Awards ceremony on Monday, July 20, at the Arvada Center, the DCPA NewsCenter has confirmed. And Colin Hanlon, who starred as the conflicted disciple Peter in the Theatre Company's world premiere staging of The 12, is also booked to perform.

    Malone is nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Musical for originating the titular role in the DCPA Theatre Company’s newly refreshed The Unsinkable Molly Brown. Malone then went on to earn a Tony Award nomination as Best Actress in a Musical for her work in Broadway’s newly crowned 2015 Best Musical, Fun Home.

    The Henry Awards honor achievement in Colorado theatre, and The Unsinkable Molly Brown leads all plays and musicals with 12 nominations for 2014-15. The DCPA Theatre Company earned two of the five nominations for best musical: Molly Brown and The 12. Each of the five nominated musicals are invited to perform during the Henry Awards.

    “We are thrilled to welcome Beth Malone and Colin Hanlon back to Denver,” said Scott Shiller, new President and CEO of the DCPA. “I am excited to experience my first Henry Awards, and for the DCPA to share this evening with such an incredible group of artists and theatre companies. I continue to be impressed with the dedication and passion for the theatre arts in Colorado. And we are honored to be part of this powerful and vibrant community that is contributing to the national landscape of theatre and driving the importance of the arts.”
     
    The Arvada Center homecoming promises to be an emotional one for Malone, who played the Narrator in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat on the Arvada Center stage during the holiday season for three years running, from 1999 to 2001. In the Talkin’ Broadway review of Joseph, critic T. Burnett likened Malone’s performance as the Narrator to the character of Ché in Evita. Bob Bows of ColoradoDrama.Com called Malone “a zesty and dynamic chanteuse.”

    "I am thrilled to be returning home to Colorado to perform at the Henrys," Malone said today. "I have so many wonderful memories at the Arvada Center, and I am really looking forward to being on that stage again."

    Beth Malone and Colin Hanlon. Photos by Jennifer M. Koskinen. Hanlon will perform a number from The 12, which examines issues of faith, courage and responsibility when a group of disciples lose their teacher. It is nominated for three Henry Awards, including Outstanding Musical and Outstanding New Play or Musical.

    "The second I left Denver, I thought, 'Please, teacher: When am I coming back?!' I never expected it would happen this quickly," Hanlon wrote in an email. Hanlon has an accomplished theatrical resume, but is perhaps best known for his guest-starring roles on TV’s Modern Family.

    "I'm honored and humbled to have been asked to represent The 12 at The Henry Awards," Hanlon said. "It will be bittersweet because I wish my entire cast and creative team could be here to celebrate our nominations. This town is filled with amazingly creative theater that's going on everywhere."

    (Photos: Beth Malone, left, and Colin Hanlon. Photos by Jennifer M. Koskinen.)

    The only days off in Malone’s busy Broadway Fun Home schedule are Mondays. So she plans to fly home on Sunday, perform at the Henrys the next day, and then return to New York that night. For her, it will be very much worth it to spend a day back home celebrating her Molly Brown experience.

    "I have to say that doing Molly Brown, and have it be a success on the level that it was, really helped me walk into Fun Home knowing that I could lead a cast," said Malone. "Molly Brown and that whole experience at the Denver Center bolstered my confidence in my bones."

    Malone, a graduate of Douglas County High School and the University of Northern Colorado, grew up in Castle Rock and began working at the Country Dinner Playhouse at age 16. Two years later, she was starring there in Baby. She made her DCPA debut that same year at age 18 as the understudy to Mary Louise Lee — now the First Lady of Denver — in Beehive, produced by Rick Seeber in what is now the Garner Galleria Theatre.

    Malone made her debut with the Denver Center Theatre Company in 1993 in the world premiere of Jeffrey Hatcher’s Bon Voyage, a musical adaptation of Noel Coward’s Sail Away directed by Bruce K. Sevy. She then spent several years performing in and around Snowmass at the Crystal Palace and Theatre Aspen before performing regularly at many Front Range theaters.




    Last year, Malone originated the role of cartoonist Alison Bechdel in Fun Home, which was then a Pulitzer-nominated, off-Broadway musical about a woman who was coming to terms with her sexuality at the same time her closeted father committed suicide.

    Malone returned to the DCPA last fall to play Molly Brown, winning the lead role even though no one from the creative team knew then that she, like Molly Brown, was a Colorado native. The staging was directed by three-time Tony winner Kathleen Marshall and written by three-time Tony nominee Dick Scanlan. That staging took place just before Fun Home transferred to Broadway and Malone earned the Tony Award nomination that will surely change the course of her professional life.

    Beth Malone, back, played the Narrator in three successive stagings of 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' at the Arvada Center. She'll return to that stage on Monday, July 20, for the Colorado Theatre Guild's Henry Awards.
    Beth Malone with Charles Langely in the Arvada Center's 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.'Beth Malone, back, above, played the Narrator in three successive stagings of 'Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat' at the Arvada Center. She'll return to that stage on Monday, July 20, for the Colorado Theatre Guild's Henry Awards. At right, Malone with 'Joseph' star Charles Langely. File photos by P. Switzer.

    2014-15 Henry Awards
    6 p.m. Monday, July 20
    Arvada Center. 6901 Wadsworth Blvd.
    Tickets: $23 for CTG members, $30 non-members or $50 VIP. Tickets go on sale July 6 through the Arvada Center website or by calling 720-898-7200. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door for $35.

    TO SEE THE COMPLETE LIST OF HENRY AWARD NOMINATIONS, CLICK HERE

    The DCPA Theatre Company's 2015 Henry Award nominees:
    Outstanding Season for a Theatre Company

    Outstanding Production of a Musical
    The 12, Richard Seyd, Director; Michael Mancini, Musical Direction
    The Unsinkable Molly Brown, Kathleen Marshall, Director; Michael Rafter, Musical Direction

    Outstanding Direction of a Musical
    Kathleen Marshall, The Unsinkable Molly Brown

    Outstanding Musical Direction
    Michael Rafter, The Unsinkable Molly Brown

    Outstanding Choreography
    Kathleen Marshall, The Unsinkable Molly Brown

    Outstanding Actor in a Play
    Mike Hartman, Benediction

    Outstanding Actress in a Play  
    Joyce Cohen, Benediction

    Outstanding Actor in a Musical
    Burke Moses, The Unsinkable Molly Brown

    Outstanding Actress in a Musical
    Beth Malone, The Unsinkable Molly Brown

    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Play            
    Billie McBride, Benediction

    Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Musical
    Constantine Germanacos, The Unsinkable Molly Brown 

    Outstanding New Play or Musical
    The 12, book and lyrics by Robert Schenkkan; music and lyrics by Neil Berg; Richard Seyd, Director; Michael Mancini, Musical Direction

    Outstanding Costume Design
    Paul Tazewell, The Unsinkable Molly Brown 

    Outstanding Lighting Design
    Lap Chi Chu, The 12
    Donald Holder, The Unsinkable Molly Brown 

    Outstanding Scenic Design

    Derek McLane, The Unsinkable Molly Brown      

    Outstanding Sound Design
    Craig Breitenbach, The Unsinkable Molly Brown 

    Previous NewsCenter coverage of the 2015 Henry Awards:
    The Henry Awards: The complete list of nominations
    Duck and cover: Gloria Shanstrom takes your Henry Awards questions
    Guest essay by Margie Lamb: Something about the Henry Award doesn't add up

    More NewsCenter coverage of Beth Malone and Colin Hanlon:

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    ABOUT THE EDITOR
    John Moore
    John Moore
    Award-winning arts journalist John Moore has recently taken a groundbreaking new position as the DCPA’s Senior Arts Journalist. With The Denver Post, he was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the US by American Theatre Magazine. He is the founder of the Denver Actors Fund, a nonprofit that raises money for local artists in medical need. John is a native of Arvada and attended Regis Jesuit High School and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Follow him on Twitter @moorejohn.

    DCPA is the nation’s largest not-for-profit theatre organization dedicated to creating unforgettable shared experiences through beloved Broadway musicals, world-class plays, educational programs and inspired events. We think of theatre as a spark of life — a special occasion that’s exciting, powerful and fun. Join us today and we promise an experience you won't soon forget.