• Photos: Opening Night of 'FADE'

    by John Moore | Feb 13, 2016
    FADE in Denver

    Photos from the DCPA Theatre Company's world-premiere performance of FADE, on Feb. 12. To see more photos, click the forward button on the image above. All photos may be downloaded for free directly from the Flickr album above.

    Fade Opening Night. Photo by John Moore. Our gallery includes photos backstage before the show, and from the celebration after the performance. One portion of the album includes photos from Club Denver, which serves at the lobby of the Ricketson Theatre. It was transformed to look like an actual TV writers' room on a Hollywood lot to give audience members a feel for the world of the play before they went inside the theatre.

    In Tanya Saracho's new play FADE, the Mexican-born Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers, with unexpected consequences. 'FADE' is directed by Jerry Ruiz and features Mariana Fernández as Lucia and Eddie Martinez as Abel.

    FADE plays through March 13 in the Ricketson Theatre. More information below.

    Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. (Pictured above, from left: Director Jerry Ruiz, Eddie Martinez, Tanya Saracho and Mariana Fernández. Below: Eddie Martinez has his Marines tattoo applied backstage before the show with the help of the DCPA's Lisa Parsons.)

    FADE. Eddie Martinez. Photo by John Moore.  




    Video: Your first look at FADE:


    Video by David Lenk for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE: Ticket information

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Through March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Previous NewsCenter coverage of FADE:
     
    FADE production photos:


    FADEPhotos by Adams Visual Communications.
  • 'FADE' Perspectives: Why ARE writers' rooms so drab?

    by John Moore | Feb 10, 2016
    FADE Jerry Ruiz and Timothy R. Mackabee. Photo by John Moore. 'FADE' Perspectives conversation on Feb. 5 at The Jones Theatre, from left:

    Director Jerry Ruiz, Scenic Designer Timothy R. Mackabee and DCPA Literary Manager Doug Langworthy. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Perspectives is a series of free panel conversations moderated by DCPA Theatre Company Literary Manager Douglas Langworthy. They take place from 6 p.m. to 6:45 on the evening of each production's first preview performance. The next Perspectives will be held April 8 (discussing Sweeney Todd) in the Jones Theatre. No reservations necessary.

     



    In Tanya Saracho's world-premiere play FADE, opening Friday (Feb. 12) in the Ricketson Theatre, Mexican-born Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers, with unexpected consequences.

    Here’s some of what we learned from Literary Manager Douglas Langworthy’s conversation with FADE Director Jerry Ruiz and Scenic Designer Timothy R. Mackabee. The production's two actors, you soon will learn, were off learning brand new lines for Saracho's play. They are Mariana Fernández as Lucia and Eddie Martinez as Abel.

    1 Perspectives Why are TV writers' rooms so drab? FADE is set in a TV writer's office in Los Angeles. And TV writers’ rooms are not just drab. “They are crappy,” says Mackabee, who has the opportunity to work on several TV shows. “The funny thing about these rooms is that they are made for creative people do wonderful things, and they are the most awful rooms you could ever want to be in in your life.” Considering the budgets these shows have, who go so cheap on the aesthetics? "Usually a show rents a space to work and then you go out and rent a bunch of horrible Ikea furniture because the show might last only one season - and that's it. So there is never money or effort spent on these spaces because they are so temporary in nature.”

    Macakabee’s scenic design for FADE intentionally makes the Lucia's work space very cramped. “We are only using about a third of the Ricketson Theatre stage because we want it to be claustrophobic," he said. "These two cannot get away from each other.”

    For this production, Club Denver (located just outside of the Ricketson Theatre lobby), will be curated to look like a TV writing room, complete lousy furniture and bad lighting, to give the audience a sense of the play's environment even before walking into the theatre. 

    2 Perspectives What is the meaning of the title? “Originally, I think Tanya chose FADE because ‘fade to black’ is a common TV term,” Ruiz said. “But I also think it refers to our protagonist. Lucia comes into this job with a very clear sense of purpose. She has a mission she wants to accomplish on this TV show. But along the way, she gets so caught up in trying to survive in this shark-tank environment that she begins to lose sight of that. So her clarity of vision starts to fade away."


    John Moore's 2015 video interview with 'FADE' playwright Tanya Saracho.

    3 Perspectives

    Hispanic vs. Latino: What’s in a name? There is a moment in FADE when those two terms are bandied about. And both generate controversy. “Hispanic is an official term. It’s the one that is used on the U.S. census,” said Ruiz. “But a lot of people don't like that term politically because the root of the word is 'Hispania,' and that goes back to colonial Hispanic roots. A lot of us who are here in the Americas are from a Mestizo lineage – that is a combination of indigenous people who were already here and the colonists who came from Spain. So it is very complicated for us to say, 'Oh, we are Hispanic,' like we are some offshoot of Spain. Many people really don't like to think of themselves that way.”

    When ‘Latino’ came along as a term, many preferred it to Hispanic because it reflects a cultural identity and a pride in being from the Americas, whether that mean South America or Mexico or Central America. “But Latino is such a huge umbrella term,” Ruiz said. “There are different nationalities, different customs and very different cultures within that term - so it's not like all Latinos are the same.”

    That’s part of what FADE is exploring, Ruiz added: "How these two people who identify as Latina or Latina come from completely different backgrounds and experiences."

    4 Perspectives Get me rewrite! FADE may become the textbook example of the DCPA’s new-play development program at work. The process starts more than a year before a developing work is introduced as a reading at the annual Colorado New Play Summit. And the work continues, in some cases, until Opening Night. “When Tanya arrived in Denver last year for the New Play Summit, she really had about the first 50 pages of the play done, so she had a whole ending section to figure out,” Ruiz said. “She did quite a bit of work while she was here, and then the Denver Center conducted a workshop in Los Angeles last summer. All during this time, Tanya was doing more work on it, and she continued to flesh it out. By the time we got here to Denver for rehearsals about a month ago, she had a very solid draft of the script. And now we are starting to make one last pass at rewrites.”

    Ruiz was speaking on Feb. 5, just before the first preview performance of FADE, and one week before the official opening on Friday (Feb. 12). About six new pages of dialogue were added that day, and the actors were off learning their new lines. What’s fascinating to learn is how rewrites can greatly impact other parts of the creative process. Even those thought done.

    “These new rewrites happen in the first few scenes of the play, and they really impact how we get to know the main character,” Ruiz said. “So when I was reading these new pages, the first thing I said was, ‘Well, we are going to have to get her some new clothes.' I went to the costume designer (Meghan Anderson Doyle) last night and I said, ‘Hey, guess what? We've got these new pages. And there is a whole different tone now. These costumes are not going to work.’ And bam, she went out shopping this morning, and now there are completely different costumes in the first half of the show. All of that happened today.”  

    That anecdote, Ruiz says, demonstrates how a new play “is very much a living organism that is evolving and changing and growing.”

    5 Perspectives Is FADE autobiographical? In part. Saracho is a writer on ABC’s How to Get Away With Murder, primarily to help transform the Mexican-born protagonist played by Karla Souza into a complicated and fully fleshed character. But her first job was writing for HBO’s Devious Maids. “Tanya is a very funny writer, but she has a serious sense of politics about Latino and Latina identity,” Ruiz said. “So I think her experience on Devious Maids was somewhat troubling. She was suddenly in a show that was probably perpetuating a lot of the stereotypes that she had spent her whole theatre career trying to combat or challenge. I think FADE very much came out of that space of feeling unsure of how to navigate the world of network television while feeling conflicted between what she had to do as a writer on the staff and her own personal artistic values."


    FADE in Denver

    Photos from the making of 'FADE' in Denver. To see the full gallery, click the forward button on the photo above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE: Ticket information
    tanya-saracho

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Through March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Previous NewsCenter coverage of FADE:
     

    FADE 600A question is posed at the latest Perspectives.
  • 'FADE': You've never seen a woman like Lucia onstage before

    by John Moore | Jan 13, 2016
    FADE in Denver
    Photos from the first rehearsal of 'FADE' on Jan. 8. To see more photos, click the 'forward' arrow. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    FADE is a new play written by a Mexican-born playwright who acknowledges the first tentative step many U.S. businesses take toward employment equality is the token diversity hire.

    FADE takes place in a Hollywood TV studio, where the lead character, Lucia, is out of her element. “This is a practice that has gone on - and is still going on - in the TV and film industries, as well as our own (theatre) industry," said DCPA Theatre Company Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson, "where many times a person - whether a writer, actor, director - is the token diverse person brought into a creative situation.”

    Jerry Ruiz QuoteBy focusing on a Latina TV writer and her friendship with a third-generation American Chicano who works as her custodian, “FADE really is a play that reveals the complexity that we all know exists within the Hispanic/Latino/Chicano community, but is rarely revealed on our main stages,” Thompson said at Monday’s first rehearsal for the DCPA Theatre Company’s world premiere that starts performances on Feb. 5. “You have two really interesting characters here who come from completely different backgrounds.”

    What’s also very different about FADE, director Jerry Ruiz says, is the storyteller. Playwright Tanya Saracho is native of Los Mochis, Mexico, and a Boston University alum who describes herself as “an Americanized, acculturated Mexican citizen with a green card.” Lucia is based somewhat on her experiences as a first-time TV writer.

    “There is no playwright on the American theatre scene that is doing what Tanya is doing,” Ruiz said. “Yes, she is very funny, and very provocative, but there are really serious ideas at the heart of all of her plays. She really tackles class distinctions and class differences within this nebulous Latino population that we always hear about. But she really sheds light on just how varied and diverse that set of people is.

    “I think she is an incredibly unique and important voice in the American theatre.”

    In the play, Lucia is an immigrant, but she is clearly a woman of means. Whereas the janitor, in a very not metaphorical way – cleans her trash. Lucia has been brought in to write specifically for the TV show’s token Latina TV character, because none of the white male writers have a clue what makes the character tick. And it turns out, the custodian may have a better understanding of that than Lucia does.

    “What I love about this play is that it is a story about privilege - and who has it; power - and who has it," Ruiz said. "That's really why this story is so ‘of our moment.’ This idea of who gets to tell this story, and how is it told? It's the story of appropriation. It's about how the experience of a working-class military man who is Mexican-American gets re-shaped."

    This is simply a character, the director said, theatre audiences have not seen onstage before.

    “Tanya writes such complex female characters,” Ruiz said. “I think Lucia has had a lot of privilege in her life. She probably comes from money. She is someone who has navigated the world. She has a good education, she looks a certain way. But she is powerless within the hierarchy of the television show. To me, the turning point in the play is when she suddenly realizes, ‘Oh my gosh, I have no power right now. That's what this terrible feeling is. They just see me as a translator - as one of “them.” ’ So then the question becomes - what is she willing to do?”

    Saracho believes it’s not important how she – or Lucia – found their way into the writers’ room. It’s more important that they earned their way into their next jobs. “I am grateful that they were aware enough to know that our voice was missing,” Saracho said. "In time, hopefully these (diversity) programs will be gone, because we will have redefined the mainstream - and we will not be 'otherized' this way.

    “I say just let us into the castle. We'll do something while we're in there.”


    'FADE' features Eddie Martinez and Mariana Fernández. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. 


    FADE: Ticket information
    tanya-saracho
  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Feb. 5-March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • In this  true-to-life new comedy, Mexican-American Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers with unexpected consequences. FADE is a standout new play from Tanya Saracho, whose writing “lands in that sweet spot between comedy and drama” (Chicago Tribune).
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • Mariana Fernández of 'FADE.' Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.
  • Saracho on the color of TV: 'We look like the future'

    by John Moore | Jan 11, 2016

    Tanya Saracho
    From left: 'FADE' playwright Tanya Saracho, actors Eddie Martinez and Mariana Fernández, and director Jerry Ruiz.


    Writer Tanya Saracho works in a magical place called ShondaLand where there are unicorns literally running down the hallways.

    OK, maybe not so much unicorns … literally. But compared to the rest of a television landscape that remains dominated by white male writers, Saracho is living out a fantasy that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.

    how-to-get-away-with-murder-season-2Saracho, whose play FADE will begin performances in its world premiere staging at the Denver Center’s Ricketson Theatre on Feb. 5, is moonlighting as a staff writer on the hit ABC series How to Get Away with Murder (pictured right). 

    Veteran TV writer and playwright Theresa Rebeck, whose new play The Nest will debut on the stage right next to FADE, recently told the DCPA NewsCenter: “I am tired of (TV) being a boys club where I am the only woman around.”

    Saracho, on the other hand, is writing for a TV show with nine writers, five of whom are women, “and we're all of color,” she says. “So we’re the majority in that room. Everyone’s queer or of color or whatever and we look like … everything.

    “We look like the future.”

    Tanya Saracho quoteShondaLand is the name of the production company founded by African-American producer Shonda Rhimes (Grey's Anatomy, Scandal). But Saracho is the first to admit that ShondaLand is not Hollywoodland. Yet.

    “It’s different because this show has a female lead of color (Viola Davis) who is really problematic and complicated and beautiful and ugly at the same time,” said Saracho. “I feel you can only fully write that character if you have a shorthand in the writers’ room. Where if she does a little twist with her hair, then you already know that has social and cultural connotations.”

    Saracho previously wrote for HBO’s Looking and Girls. Her life changed when she wrote a full episode of Looking that aired last February. She realizes that more people saw that one episode of television than will likely see all of her stage plays combined over her lifetime.

    “I realized the power of TV when I wrote that episode,” she said. “I wrote this line that was something like, ‘White guys are the worst - they think they own everything.’ Well, that got people talking. All these memes showed up on social media, and I was like, ‘Wait a minute. I've been doing all this political theatre from the beginning of my career and no one has ever made a meme out of it.’ But it’s crazy the reach that television has.”

    Saracho sees positive change everywhere. Davis became the first black woman to win the Emmy for leading actress in a TV drama. On Sunday, Taraji Henson won the Golden Globe in that same category for Empire. “All these things are happening, and it’s exciting,” Saracho said.

    Such was not the case when Saracho started writing FADE, which was partly inspired by her experiences working her first TV job. She is the first to tell you she was an untrained quota hire.

    FADE is about a first-time TV writer named Lucia who doesn’t know what she is doing,” Saracho said. When Lucia discovers that the studio custodian, Abel, has a more credible understanding of the fictional star character she is supposed to be writing for than she does, she begins incorporating his insights into her scripts. Lucia’s professional stardom rises, but soon she must grapple with the possibility that she has become part of the problem she came to the studio to help solve. 

    Saracho’s play was featured at the last Colorado New Play Summit, when the story was still a developing idea. In the year since, she says, she has leaned more into the tougher consequences of her story – specifically the issue of betrayal.

    “I was kind of shying away from that and making excuses for her,” she said. "But then we did a workshop and now I feel like, yes, let this be an ugly act of true betrayal.”

    She is essentially forcing herself to do what she is challenging audiences to do – and that is to look again at our preconceptions and prejudices about immigration.

    “I've been obsessed with trapping class in my plays since the beginning, especially when it comes to a Mexican point of view,” said Saracho, who, like her fictional lead character, was born in Mexico and describes herself as “an Americanized, acculturated Mexican citizen with a green card.” When you consider that the lowly Abel is a third-generation Chicano, the culture clash between the two characters is bound to get necessarily messy.

    “I know that a lot of people in this country think of a Mexican immigrant in only one way,” Saracho said. “I like to flip that around. So here the woman has money and status and yet, she is the Mexican immigrant. And if you think the janitor looks and feels more like what you think an immigrant is, well, no: He’s a full-blooded American.

    “I would love for people to think about immigration in a more complicated way. Not so much the politics of it but more: Do you really understand your neighbor to the south? Do you really understand the class system and the pathways to getting here and staying here?”

    And when FADE opens and Saracho returns to ShondaLand, she will do so knowing that TV writer rooms still look a lot more like they do in FADE than they do at How to Get Away with Murder.

    “No, we can't say that it’s all better just because of this one room," she said. “The lack of agency and opportunity in television is real - and it is true.”


    FADE 
    tanya-saracho

  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Feb. 5-March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • In this  true-to-life new comedy, Mexican-American Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers with unexpected consequences. FADE is a standout new play from Tanya Saracho, whose writing “lands in that sweet spot between comedy and drama” (Chicago Tribune).
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.
  • Cast lists: Theatre Company's 'The Nest,' 'FADE'

    by John Moore | Dec 30, 2015
    Theresa Rebeck quoteBy Hope Grandon
    For The DCPA NewsCenter

    The DCPA Theatre Company has announced full casting and creative teams for the upcoming world-premiere productions of Theresa Rebeck’s The Nest and Tanya Saracho’s FADE. (Photo at right: Theresa Rebeck).

    Both productions are Theatre Company commissions made possible by the Women’s Voices Fund and were developed at the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit.

    The Women’s Voices Fund is a $1 million endowment that specifically supports new plays by women and the hiring of female directors. The fund has allowed the Theatre Company to produce 26 plays by women, commission 16 female playwrights and hire 20 female directors since 2006.

    “We are honored to have two powerhouse female playwrights bringing world premieres to life at the same time,” said Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson. “Tanya Saracho is a funny, gifted, rising writer who is intensely aware of the layers and complexities in Hispanic culture. Theresa Rebeck is undeniably one of the most foremost female playwrights in the country and The Nest contains the best first scene of a play that I’ve read in years.”

    The Nest, directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt, will feature Kevin Berntson as Ned, Brian D. Coats as Barry, Brian Dykstra as Patrick, Laura Latreille as Lila, Victoria Mack as Sam, David Mason as Nick, Carly Street as Margo and Andrea Syglowski as Irene.

    The creative team is made up of Lisa Orzolek (Scenic Designer), Angela Balogh Calin (Costume Designer), Grant W. S. Yeager (Lighting Designer), and Craig Breitenbach (Sound Designer).

    Saracho’s FADE, directed by Jerry Ruiz, will feature Mariana Fernández as Lucia and Eddie Martinez, who recently appeared in the Theatre Company’s production of As You Like It, as Abel.

    The creative team includes Timothy R. Mackabee (Scenic Designer), Meghan Anderson Doyle (Costume Designer), Richard Devin (Lighting Designer) and Tyler Nelson (Sound Designer).

    Over the past decade, the Colorado Summit has introduced 40 new plays, more than half of which returned to the stage as full DCPA Theatre Company productions. Recent Summit world premieres include Samuel D. Hunter’s The Whale, Eric Schmidel’s adaptation of Kent Haruf’s Benediction, Marcus Gardley’s black odyssey, Karen Zacarias’s Just Like Us and Dick Scanlan’s reimagined version of The Unsinkable Molly Brown.

    The Nest
    theresa-rebeck
  • By Theresa Rebeck
  • Jan. 22-Feb. 21
  • Space Theatre
  • When you have a seat at the bar called The Nest, no conversation is off-limits, whether you’re speaking or eavesdropping. That is, until a stranger walks in with a lucrative proposition. Pulitzer Prize finalist Theresa Rebeck’s plays “may make you laugh or shudder (or both)” according to American Theatre, and with its feisty humor and scorching dialogue, this explosive new comedy holds a cracked mirror up to friendships, romantic relationships and families.
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE

  • FADE 
    tanya-saracho
  • By Tanya Saracho
  • Feb. 5-March 13
  • Ricketson Theatre
  • In this sharp, true-to-life new comedy, Mexican-American Lucia is hired to write for a Latina TV character in a cutthroat Hollywood TV studio. She soon discovers that the Latino studio custodian, Abel, has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows, his stories start to blur with hers with unexpected consequences. FADE is a standout new play from Tanya Saracho, whose writing “lands in that sweet spot between comedy and drama” (Chicago Tribune).
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE

  • Additional ticket information:

  • TTY: 303-893-9582
  • Groups of 15 or more: 303-446-4829
  • Also: Purchase in person at The Denver Center Ticket Office, located at the Helen Bonfils Theatre Complex lobby. Buy and print online at DenverCenter.Org.

  • 2016 Colorado New Play Summit
  • Launch Weekend Feb. 13-14
  • Festival Weekend Feb. 19-21
  • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or go to the Summit home page
  • DCPA Theatre Company announces 2015-16 directors

    by John Moore | Jun 29, 2015
    Anthony Powell, who directed 'Lord of the Flies' last season, returns to helm 'All the Way' in 2016. Photo by John Moore.
    Anthony Powell, who directed "Lord of the Flies" last season, returns to helm "All the Way" in 2016. Photo by John Moore.


    The DCPA Theatre Company has announced its announces directors for the upcoming 2015-16 season:

    Lookingglass Alice

    In association with The Actors Gymnasium
    David CatlinSept. 11-Oct 11
    Adapted and Directed by David Catlin
    From the works of Lewis Carroll
    David Catlin is a founding ensemble member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company, the recipient of the 2011 Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre. He is a senior professor in the theatre department at Northwestern University. The goal at Lookingglass is to redefine the limits of theatrical experience and to make theatre exhilarating, inspirational, and accessible to all.

    As You Like It

    Sept. 25-Nov. 1
    Kent ThompsonDirected by Kent Thompson
    By William Shakespeare
    The Denver Center Producing Artistic Director takes on his seventh Shakespeare title since arriving in 2006. Previous titles include Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream and King Lear. This is the DCPA's first full staging of this comedy of romance that ends in four couples getting married.

    Tribes
    Oct. 9-Nov. 15
    Stephen Weitz (Instructor)Directed by Stephen Weitz
    By Nina Raine
    Weitz, founder of the award-winning Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company, has both acted with the DCPA Theatre Company (King Lear, Richard III, Othello) and directed (Jackie & Me). Weitz earned an MA in Theatre from CU-Boulder and an MFA at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. Tribes poses a unique challenge in that it focuses on a fiercely intelligent and proudly politically incorrect family who argue a lot but don’t communicate with their grown deaf son.
     
    A Christmas Carol
    Bruce SevyNov. 27-Dec 27
    Directed by Bruce K. Sevy
    Written by Charles Dickens
    Adapted by Richard Hellesen
    Music by David de Berry
    With his ninth staging of the DCPA's popular holiday favorite, Associate Artistic Director Bruce K. Sevy will match Laird Williamson with 40 DCPA credits as the busiest director in company history.




    The Nest

    Adrienne Campbell-HoltJan. 22-Feb. 21, 2016
    Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt
    Written by Theresa Rebeck
    Adrienne Campbell-Holt is the Founding Artistic Director of Colt Coeur, a Brooklyn-based theatre company that has mounted five world-premieres in the past five years. This year, she will direct Laura Jacqmin’s Dental Society Midwinter Meeting for the Williamstown Theatre Festival, First Life at Colt Coeur and the world premiere of Theresa Rebeck’s The Nest for the DCPA. It's about a group of middle-class regulars at a small, struggling bar.

    All The Way
    Jan. 29-Feb 28, 2016
    Directed By Anthony Powell
    Anthony Powell. Written by Robert Schenkkan
     All the Way, the 2014 Tony Award-winner for best new play, marks the return of Anthony Powell, who last directed Lord of the Flies. His 32 previous DCPA credits include The Pillowman and Death of a Salesman. He is also Artistic Director of the venerable local company dedicated to storytelling, Stories on Stage. All the Way is Robert Schenkkan's (The 12) acclaimed look the LBJ presidency.



    FADE

    Jerry RuizFeb. 5-March 13, 2016
    Directed by Jerry Ruiz
    By Tanya Saracho
    Born in Brownsville, Texas, Ruiz is based in New York City with a portfolio largely focused on directing new plays. He directed the reading of FADE that was performed at the Colorado New Play Summit in February. His credits include Karen Zacarias' Mariela in the Desert for Repertorio Español. FADE is about a  one-book Mexican-American novelist named Lucia who is hired to write for a popular weekly TV serial.

    Sweeney Todd
    April 8-May 15, 2016
    Directed By Kent Thompson
    Written by Stephen Sondheim
    Based on an adaptation by Christopher Bond
    Thompson, whose 20 DCPA credits to date include two stagings of the Irvin Berlin musical White Christmas, turns his attention to this all-new look at Stephen Sondheim's  legendary demon barber of Fleet Street. Thompson will work with DeVotchKa, the Grammy-nominated, Denver hometown band that has been given the OK from Sondheim himself to infuse his classic score with DeVotchKa’s lush brand of gypsy punk.

    READ MORE ABOUT THE DCPA THEATRE COMPANY'S NEW SEASON HERE

    READ OUR EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NICK URATA OF DEVOTCHKA


    Tickets and subscriptions
    New and renewing subscribers have the first opportunity to reserve tickets. Tickets are presently available to subscribers, online here,  or by calling 303-893-6030 or 303-893-4100. Subscribers are guaranteed the best seats at the best prices, along with additional benefits. Single tickets will go on sale to the general public in late summer.
  • 2015 Summit Spotlight video: Tanya Saracho's ‘Fade'

    by John Moore | Feb 21, 2015


    Fade, by Tanya Saracho, is about Mexican-born Lucia, who is hired as a novice to write for a Latina character on an L.A.-based TV series. The play is based on Saracho's own experiences writing for the TV shows Devious Maids, Girls and Looking. "Listen: I got into television because I was a diversity hire,' she says bluntly. "I don't care why I got in there. I just needed an in, because we need to be in there."

    In Fade, the  character of Lucia soon discovers that the film studio's Chicano studio custodian has a windfall of plot ideas. As their friendship grows and she begins incorporating his insights into her scripts, Lucia’s professional stardom starts to rise, but her personal life only becomes more and more compromised. The cast includes Alejandra Escalante, Eddie Martinez and Amy Luna. The director is Jerry Ruiz.

    Of working at the DCPA on this featured Colorado New Play Summit reading, Saracho adds: "The support of everyone is really amazing because they are just trying to get your play born. So it's like everyone is a midwife." 

    Video by John Moore and David Lenk.

    For all of our Summit coverage, click here to go to our NewsCenter.

    THE SUMMIT SPOTLIGHT VIDEO SERIES: (to date):
    Part 1: The Nest, by Theresa Rebeck
    Part 2: The There There, by Jason Gray Platt
    Part 3: Holy Laughter, by Catherine Trieschmann
    Part 4: Fade, by Tanya Saracho (today)

    MORE COVERAGE FROM THE 2015 COLORADO NEW PLAY SUMMIT:

    Photos: Week 1 of the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit
    Matthew Lopez's 2015 Summit Soliloquy video
    Primer: Your guide to the 2015 Colorado New Play Summit
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    Alejandra Escalante and Eddie Martinez in 'Fade.' Photo by John Moore. Alejandra Escalante and Eddie Martinez in 'Fade' rehearsal. Photo by John Moore.

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    ABOUT THE EDITOR
    John Moore
    John Moore
    Award-winning arts journalist John Moore has recently taken a groundbreaking new position as the DCPA’s Senior Arts Journalist. With The Denver Post, he was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the US by American Theatre Magazine. He is the founder of the Denver Actors Fund, a nonprofit that raises money for local artists in medical need. John is a native of Arvada and attended Regis Jesuit High School and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Follow him on Twitter @moorejohn.

    DCPA is the nation’s largest not-for-profit theatre organization dedicated to creating unforgettable shared experiences through beloved Broadway musicals, world-class plays, educational programs and inspired events. We think of theatre as a spark of life — a special occasion that’s exciting, powerful and fun. Join us today and we promise an experience you won't soon forget.