• Vast and visceral: 2017-18 Theatre Company, Off-Center seasons

    by John Moore | Apr 03, 2017

     

    Macbeth, The Who's Tommy, four world premieres and
    "a deep dive into some truly exciting collaborations"

    By John Moore
    DCPA Senior Arts Journalist

    The DCPA Theatre Company’s 39th season will include vast and visceral reimaginings of two distinct cutting-edge classics, a record-tying four world premieres and the company's 25th staging of perennial favorite A Christmas Carol.

    The season begins in September with visionary director Robert O'Hara’s Macbeth to reopen the newly renovated Space Theatre, and builds to The Who’s rock musical Tommy, directed by Sam Buntrock (Frankenstein). And both directors promise ambitious stagings unlike anything audiences have seen before.

    Nataki Garrett QuoteThe DCPA has worked its way to the forefront of new-play development in the American theatre, and next season’s slate will include the comedy Zoey’s Perfect Wedding by former Playwright in Residence Matthew Lopez; José Cruz González’s American Mariachi, the musical tale of an all-female 1970s mariachi band; Lauren Yee’s The Great Leap, about an American college basketball team that travels to Beijing in 1989; and Eric Pfeffinger’s timely comedy Human Error, which raucously explores the great American ideological divide through two vastly different couples - and one wrongly implanted embryo.

    Zoey’s Perfect Wedding will reunite Lopez and Mike Donahue, writer and director from the DCPA’s endearing world premiere The Legend of Georgia McBride (which makes its West Coast debut tomorrow at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles.)

    American Mariachi
    was a favorite from the Theatre Company's 2016 Colorado New Play Summit. "Women of course had many challenges trying to play in such a male-dominated musical form," González said. "We interviewed a number of amazing women who were able to help us enter into that world, and we found an amazing group of artists who will play and sing in the piece."

    The Great Leap and Human Error emerged from the recent 2017 Summit in February.  In The Great Leap, Yee explores sport as a metaphor for how countries rub up against each other in terms of strategy, styles and priorities. "If you think of all the sports out there, basketball is the one in which you can really lay the ideals of communism on top of it. Everyone gets to touch the ball. Everyone is equal in their position,” she says.

    Human Error will set a precedent as the first Theatre Company offering ever to be staged in the cabaret-style Garner-Galleria Theatre.

    “The 2017-18 DCPA Theatre Company season represents the microcosm at the heart of the American experiment,” said Associate Artistic Director Nataki Garrett. “These writers, spanning across generations, cultures, and genders, are exploring the ways in which our commonalities are more meaningful than our differences."

    2017-18 Broadway season brings Hamilton to Denver

    For the first time, the DCPA simultaneously announced the upcoming year of its adventurous and ambitious Off-Center line of programming. Off-Center is known for creating experiences that challenge conventions and expand on the traditional definition of theatre. Next season will be the largest yet for Off-Center. It includes Mixed Taste, a summer-long partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver; a 360-degree immersive staging of The Wild Party musical at the Stanley Marketplace. Also of great intrigue: Remote Denver, a  guided audio tour of the secret city; and This Is Modern Art, a controversial play by Idris Goodwin and Kevin Coval that explores graffiti as modern art ...  or urban terrorism.

    “The expansion of Off-Center is a result of the incredible response of the Denver community,” said Off-Center Curator (and Theatre Company Associate Artistic Director) Charlie Miller. “We have seen that audiences are hungry for a broad range of experiences, and are eager for the unexpected.”

    Miller calls the upcoming year "a deep dive into some truly exciting collaborations." A continuing one will be the return of The SantaLand Diaries, in partnership with Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company and again starring Michael Bouchard

    Combined, the DCPA today announced 14 upcoming new productions that will be presented across eight different venues at the Denver Performing Arts Complex and beyond.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    “Theater has the opportunity and the ability to help bridge our differences by offering performances that inspire us to seek deeper connections with one another,” said Garrett, who will make her DCPA debut directing Lydia Diamond's acclaimed race comedy Smart People. “We are honored to provide a space for conversations and connections to the Denver community this year through this season's offerings.”

    Lisa Portes Robert O'HaraMacbeth will be directed by Robert O'Hara, a rising playwright, director and screenwriter who won the 2010 NAACP Best Director Award and the 2010 Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding New Play. He was a young prodigy of original Angels in America Director George C. Wolfe and is perhaps best-known as a writer for Insurrection, a time-traveling play exploring racial and sexual identity. 

    The Who's Tommy, the rock musical based on the classic 1969 concept album about the pinball prodigy, will reunite acclaimed British Frankenstein director Sam Buntrock and Scenic Designer Jason Sherwood (who also will create the world of Macbeth). Native Gardens will mark the DCPA return of playwright Karen Zacarias, who wrote Just Like Us in 2014. Zacarias has penned a very close-to-home border-war story: One that plays out between two neighboring couples in D.C. who have a dispute over their property line. The director is Chicago's Lisa Portes, who recently won the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation's 2016 Zelda Fichandler Award, which recognizes an artist who is "transforming the regional arts landscape through singular creativity and artistry in the theatre." She is head of the masters program in directing at DePaul University.

    Next year's A Christmas Carol will be the 25th season staging of Dickens' classic by the DCPA since 1990. Melissa Rain Anderson will return for her second turn at directing, and popular longtime DCPA actor Sam Gregory again will play Scrooge.

    DCPA THEATRE COMPANY SEASON AT A GLANCE:

    • Sept. 15-Oct. 29: Robert O’Hara’s Macbeth (Space Theatre Grand Reopening)
    • Oct. 13-Nov. 19: Smart People (Ricketson Theatre)
    • Nov. 24-Dec. 24: A Christmas Carol (Stage Theatre)
    • Jan. 19-Feb. 25, 2018: Zoey’s Perfect Wedding (Space Theatre)
    • Jan. 26-Feb. 25, 2018: American Mariachi (Stage Theatre)
    • Feb. 2-March 11, 2018: The Great Leap (Ricketson Theatre)
    • April 6-May 6, 2018: Native Gardens (Space Theatre)
    • April 20-May 27, 2018: The Who's Tommy (Stage Theatre)
    • May 18-June 24, 2018: Human Error (Garner Galleria Theatre)

    DCPA OFF-CENTER 2017-18 SEASON AT A GLANCE:

    • July 5-Aug. 23 Mixed Taste, with MCA Denver (Seawell Grand Ballroom)
    • Oct. 12-31: The Wild Party (The Hangar at Stanley)
    • Nov. 24-Dec. 24: The SantaLand Diaries, with Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company (Jones Theatre)
    • March 22-April 15, 2018: This Is Modern Art (Jones Theatre)
    • Spring/Summer 2018: Remote Denver (on the streets of Denver)

    TC 2017-18 800

    And here is a more detailed look at all 14 newly announced productions, in chronological order:

    MIXED TASTE (Off-Center)
    mixed-tasteTag team lectures on unrelated topic
    Presented by Off-Center with MCA Denver
    Wednesdays from July 5 through Aug 23
    Seawell Grand Ballroom
    Even mismatched subjects will find common ground in a lecture series that can go pretty much anywhere. Two speakers get twenty minutes each to enlighten you on unrelated topics, but can’t make any connections to each other. Ideas start to blend afterward when audience members ask questions to both speakers and anything goes. READ MORE ABOUT IT



    MACBETH
    macbethBy William Shakespeare
    Directed by Robert O’Hara
    Sept. 15-Oct. 29
    Space Theatre (Grand Reopening)
    To get what he wants, Macbeth will let nothing stand in his way – not the lives of others, the people of Scotland or his own well-being. As his obsession takes command of his humanity and his sanity, the death toll rises and his suspicions mount. Shakespeare’s compact, brutal tragedy kicks off the grand reopening of our theatre-in-the-round in a visceral re-imagining from visionary director Robert O’Hara, who is “shaking up the world, one audience at a time” (The New York Times). This ambitious reinvention of the classic tale reminds us that no matter what fate is foretold, the man that chooses the dagger must suffer the consequences. 



    THE WILD PARTY
    (Off-Center)
    the-wild-partyMusic and Lyrics by Michael John LaChiusa
    Book by Michael John LaChiusa and George C. Wolfe
    Based on the poem by Joseph Moncure March
    Directed by Amanda Berg Wilson
    Oct. 12-31
    The Hangar at Stanley
    You’re invited to leave your inhibitions (and Prohibitions) behind for a decadent party in the Roaring Twenties. Indulge your inner flapper as you mingle with an unruly mix of vaudevillians, playboys, divas, and ingénues in a Manhattan apartment lost in time. Debauchery turns disastrous as wild guests becomes unhinged and their solo songs reveal the drama bubbling underneath the surface. Whether you’re a wallflower or a jitterbug, you’ll think this jazz- and booze-soaked immersive musical is the bee’s knees. Dress up in your finest pearls, suits and sequins – encouraged but not required.



    SMART PEOPLE

    smart-peopleBy Lydia R. Diamond
    Directed by Nataki Garrett
    Oct. 13-Nov. 19
    Ricketson Theatre
    Intelligence can only get you so far when it comes to navigating love, success and identity in the modern age. This biting comedy follows a quartet of Harvard intellectuals struggling to understand why the lives of so many people – including their own – continue to be undermined by race. But no matter how hard they research, question and confront the issue, their own problems with self-awareness make it difficult to face the facts of life. Fiercely clever dialogue and energetic vignettes keep the laughs coming in a story that Variety calls “Sexy, serious and very, very funny.”



    A CHRISTMAS CAROL

    christmas-carolBy Charles Dickens
    Adapted by Richard Hellesen
    Music by David de Berry
    Directed by Melissa Rain Anderson
    Nov. 24-Dec. 24
    Stage Theatre
    Essential to the holiday season in Denver, A Christmas Carol promises to “warm your heart and renew your holiday spirit” according to the Examiner. Based on Charles Dickens’ classic novel, this joyous and opulent musical adaptation traces money-hoarding skinflint Ebenezer Scrooge’s triumphant overnight journey to redemption. A Christmas Carol illuminates the meaning of the holiday season in a way that has resonated for generations. Denver favorite Sam Gregory returns as Scrooge. READ MORE ABOUT IT

    (Note: 'A Christmas Carol' is an added attraction, not part of the Theatre Company subscription season.)



    SantaLand Diaries 2016. Michael Bouchard. Photo by Adams VisCom
    'The SantaLand Diaries,' 2016. Michael Bouchard. Photo by Adams VisCom.

    THE SANTALAND DIARIES
    (Off-Center)
    By David Sedaris
    Adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello
    Presented by Off-Center with Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company
    Directed by Stephen Weitz
    Nov. 24-Dec. 24
    The Jones Theatre
    This disgruntled Macy's elf has the cure for the common Christmas show. Looking for a little more snark in your stocking? Crumpet the Elf returns for more hilarious hijinks in this acclaimed one-man show based on stories by David Sedaris. Crumpet’s twisted tales from his stint in Macy’s SantaLand are the cure for the common Christmas show. Release your holiday stress, get all of those obnoxious carols out of your head and check out even more late night options this year. READ MORE ABOUT IT



    ZOEY'S PERFECT WEDDING

    zoeys-perfect-wedding2By Matthew Lopez
    Directed by Mike Donahue
    Jan. 19-Feb. 25, 2018
    Space Theatre
    The blushing bride. The touching toast. The celebration of true love. These are the dreams of Zoey’s big day…and the opposite of what it’s turning out to be. Disaster after disaster follow her down the aisle, from brutally honest boozy speeches to a totally incompetent wedding planner. Even worse, her friends are too preoccupied with their own relationship woes to help with the wreckage around them. From the team that brought you, The Legend of Georgia McBride, Matthew Lopez’s wildly funny fiasco destroys expectations with the realities of commitment, fidelity and growing up. READ OUR 2015 INTERVIEW WITH MATTHEW LOPEZ



    AMERICAN MARIACHI

    american-mariachi2By José Cruz González
    Director to be announced
    Jan. 26-Feb. 25, 2018
    The Stage Theatre
    Lucha and Bolie are ready to start their own all-female mariachi band in the 1970s. The only things standing in their way are a male-dominated music genre, patriarchal pressure from inside their families and finding the right women to fill out their sound. As they practice, perform and strive to earn the respect of their community, their music sparks a transformation in the lives of those around them – especially Lucha’s parents. This humorous, heartwarming story about music’s power to heal and connect includes gorgeous live mariachi music played on stage. González writes a passionate story about families and friendships that you should share with yours. READ OUR FULL INTERVIEW WITH JOSÉ CRUZ GONZÁLEZ


     

    THE GREAT LEAP
    the-great-leap2By Lauren Yee
    Director to be announced
    Feb. 2-March 11, 2018
    Ricketson Theatre
    When an American college basketball team travels to Beijing for an exhibition game in 1989, the drama on the court goes deeper than the strain between their countries. For two men with a past and one teen with a future, it’s a chance to stake their moment in history and claim personal victories off the scoreboard. American coach Saul grapples with his relevance to the sport, Chinese coach Wen Chang must decide his role in his rapidly-changing country and Chinese American player Manford seeks a lost connection. Tensions rise right up to the final buzzer as history collides with the action in the stadium. Yee’s “acute ear for contemporary speech” and a “devilishly keen satiric eye” (San Francisco Chronicle) creates an unexpected and touching story inspired by events in her own father’s life. READ OUR FULL INTERVIEW WITH LAUREN YEE


     

    THIS IS MODERN ART
    this-is-modern-artBy Kevin Coval and Idris Goodwin
    Directed by Idris Goodwin
    March 22-April 15, 2018
    The Jones Theatre
    Graffiti crews are willing to risk anything for their art. Called vandals, criminals, even creative terrorists, Chicago graffiti artists set out night after night to make their voices heard and alter the way people view the world. But when one crew finishes the biggest graffiti bomb of their careers, the consequences get serious and spark a public debate asking, where does art belong? This Is Modern Art gives a glimpse into the lives of anonymous graffiti artists and asks us to question the true purpose of art. READ MORE ABOUT IT


    NATIVE GARDENS
    native-gardensBy Karen Zacarias
    Directed by Lisa Portes
    April 6-May 6, 2018
    Space Theatre
    Dealing with neighbors can be thorny, especially for Pablo and Tania, a young Latino couple who have just moved into a well-established D.C. neighborhood. Though Frank and Virginia have the best intentions for making the new couple feel welcome next door, their newly budding friendship is tested when they realize their shared property line isn’t where it’s supposed to be. Frank is afraid of losing his prized garden, Pablo wants what is legally his, Tania has a pregnancy and a thesis she’d rather be worrying about, and Virginia just wants some peace. But until they address the real roots of their problems, it’s all-out war in this heartfelt comedy about the lines that divide us and those that connect us.



    Sam Buntock

    THE WHO'S TOMMY
    the-whos-tommyMusic and Lyrics by Pete Townshend
    Book by Pete Townshend and Des McAnuff
    Additional Music and Lyrics by John Entwistle and Keith Moon
    Directed by Sam Buntrock
    April 20-May 27, 2018
    Stage Theatre
    Based on The Who’s iconic 1969 rock concept album, Tommy is an exhilarating musical about the challenges of self-discovery and the resilience of the human spirit. When young Tommy retreats into a world of darkness and silence after a deeply traumatic incident, he must navigate a harsh and unforgiving world with no hope of recovery. But when he discovers a newfound talent for pinball, he’s swept up in the fame and fortune of his success. Tommy and his family give new voice to The Who’s classic stadium rock as they navigate the troubles and joys of being alive. This production reunites director Sam Buntrock and scenic designer Jason Sherwood, the team behind last season’s audience favorite, Frankenstein.



    HUMAN ERROR

    human-error2By Eric Pfeffinger
    Director to be announced
    May 18-June 24, 2018
    Garner Galleria Theatre
    Madelyn and Keenan are NPR-listening, latte-sipping, blue-state liberals, while Heather and Jim are NRA-cardholding, truck-driving, red-state conservatives. After an unfortunate mix-up by their blundering fertility doctor, Heather is mistakenly impregnated with the wrong child. Now the two couples face sharing an uproarious nine-month’s odyssey of culture shock, clashing values, changing attitudes and unlikely – but heartfelt – friendships. “Up-and-coming scribe Eric Pfeffinger has the vital nerve to explore the gaping communication gap between red America and blue America, liberal humanists and the conservative right” (Chicago Tribune). READ OUR FULL INTERVIEW WITH ERIC PFEFFINGER


    REMOTE DENVER
    remote-denverBy Rimini Protokoll
    Concept, Script and Direction: Stefan Kaegi
    Research, Script and Direction Denver: Jörg Karrenbauer
    Spring/Summer 2018
    On the streets of Denver
    Join a group of 50 people swarming Denver on a guided audio tour that seems to follow you as much as you are following it. Experience a soundtrack to the streets, sights, and rooftops of The Mile High City as a computer-generated voice guides your group’s movements in real time. Discover a "secret Denver," exploring places like gathering spaces, back alleyways, dark hallways and public areas through a new lens. You’re not just audience members — you’re actors and spectators, observers and observed, individuals and hordes, all at the same time.

     

    TICKET INFORMATION:

    • Theatre Company: New and renewing subscribers have the first opportunity to reserve tickets. Subscription packages are available online at denvercenter.org/nextseason or by calling 303-893-4100. Subscribers enjoy free ticket exchanges, payment plans, priority offers to added attractions, discounted extra tickets, a dedicated VIP hotline, free events including talkbacks and receptions, and the best seats at the best prices, guaranteed. Single ticket on-sale date will be announced at a later time. Note: Plans for the new season are subject to change and benefit restrictions may apply.
    • Off-Center: The single-ticket on-sale date for all Off-Center productions will be announced at a later time. Subscriptions are not available for Off-Center shows.

     

     

  • 2016 True West Award: John Hauser

    by John Moore | Dec 25, 2016
    True West Awards John Hauser


    30 DAYS, 30 BOUQUETS

    Day 25: John Hauser

    If you were to call him Doogie Hauser, you would only be the latest. But given how well former child TV star Neil Patrick Harris’ career has turned out, John Hauser would surely take the compliment.

    We’re not saying Hauser is a kid. But his Biloxi Blues director Kate Gleason is saying that “as soon as John is potty-trained … he's gonna make a great actor.”

    True West Awards John Hauser QuoteSo he’s young. But there was nothing embryonic about his fully formed year on local stages: He starred in Biloxi Blues at Miners Alley Playhouse, and in Hand to God for Curious Theatre. He made a key appearance in Vintage Theatre's Rabbit Hole, and he performed as Romeo before 10,000 high-school students for DCPA Education.

    That’s a U.S. Army private who comes of age at Basic Training in Neil Simon’s 1943 Mississippi. A grieving, God-fearing teen in possession of (or possessed by) a devilish hand puppet. A guilt-wracked teen who plowed his car into a 4-year-old. And only the most famous lover in all of literature. Plus, he joined the cast of Off-Center’s immersive freakout Sweet and Lucky, and later understudied several roles in the DCPA Theatre Company’s Frankenstein.

    John Hauser may not be old. But as an actor, he grew up in 2016.

    “He’s so good, you forget how young he is,” said  Gleason, herself a 2014 True West Award winner. “I mean, he's barely teething, and yet he manages to find humanity in all his roles.”

    When DCPA Education Director Allison Watrous launched a new pilot program called Shakespeare in the Parking Lot in May 2015, she turned to Hauser first. A team from DCPA Education perform an abridged version of Romeo and Juliet on and around a beat-up old truck in school parking lots - sometimes four times a day. Meaning four times a day, students who otherwise might never be exposed to Shakespeare (or live theatre) crush on the Bard, crush on live performance and, invariably for some, crush on the actor who could win Prom King at just about every school he visits.

    “John is stunning as Romeo,” Watrous said. “He connects to the hearts and minds of the students through authenticity, vulnerability, humor, kindness and depth.” (Pictured below and right: John Hauser as Romeo. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.)

    Read our recent profile on John Hauser

    Hauser and his castmates, all skilled DCPA Education Teaching Artists, return to each school the next day for classroom workshops and ask students tough, ethically ambiguous questions that revolve around teenagers, their parents and issues of privacy and personal responsibility. The point is to help them better understand the issues at the heart of Romeo and Juliet. Because being a teen hasn't changed as much as you might think.

    True West Awards John Hauser Shakespeare in the Parking Lot"I am so grateful for John's energy and impact,” Watrous said. “He is a true talent.”

    Next semester, the team will tackle A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

    Hauser did not just turn a finger up at his squeaky-clean image, but his entire right hand with Hand to God, Robert Askins’ profanely dark comedy about a troubled teen who is forced to join his mother’s church-led puppet group after his father dies. But when his foul-mouthed sock puppet Tyrone takes on a life of its own and begins to encourage all those around him to give in to their carnal desires, the teen starts to question everything he's been taught. 

    “John brings a true lightness to the room,” said Hand to God Director Dee Covington. “He is generous, reflective and tireless in his determination to not only conquer but totally devour the creative task at hand. He knew the mountain was steep and arduous, but I was so impressed by his ability to temper that slightly self-effacing inner critic with humor and fearlessness. His grit and heart are inspiring.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    Westword theatre critic Juliet Wittman wrote: “Hauser does brilliantly in the schizophrenic role of Jason, fully inhabiting both the teen’s innocence and Tyrone’s savagery, skillfully manipulating the intransigent puppet.”

    True West Awards John Hauser Rabbit Hole In July, Hauser and his Rabbit Hole cast were honored with the Colorado Theatre Guild’s Outstanding Ensemble Henry Award (with Haley Johnson, Marc Stith, Maggy Stacy and Deborah Persoff). As the accidental grim reaper who devastates a family when their son runs in front of his car, “John Hauser manages to deliver a handful of wallops in his limited scenes,” wrote the Aurora Sentinel’s Quincy Snowdon.

    But perhaps the most impressive evidence of Hauser’s stellar year is simply his dream team of directors: Kate Gleason, Allison Watrous, Dee Covington, Bernie Cardell  (Rabbit Hole), Zach Morris (Sweet and Lucky) and Sam Buntrock (Frankenstein).

    “He is a lovely human being,” Covington said, “and he makes the world a more artful place.”

    And he's not slowing down in 2017. In January, Hauser will be playing Ken in John Logan’s acclaimed Red, the story of the temperamental genius artist Mark Rothko and his apprentice, at the Breckenridge Backstage Theatre.

    (Pictured above and right: Haley Johnson and John Hauser in Vintage Theatre's 'Rabbit Hole.' Photo by Denver Mind Media.)

    John Hauser/At a glance

    • Hometown: Cocoa, Fla.
    • Home now: Denver
    • High school: The Classical Academy in Colorado Springs
    • College: Adams State University in Alamosa
    • Selected additional credits: The Few and Ambition Facing West for Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company; Jerusalem for The Edge Theatre Company
    ABOUT THE TRUE WEST AWARDS
    The True West Awards, now in their 16th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2016 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist. His daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    THE 2016 TRUE WEST AWARDS
    Day 1: Jada Suzanne Dixon
    Day 2: Robert Michael Sanders
    Day 3: After Orlando
    Day 4: Michael Morgan
    Day 5: Beth Beyer
    Day 6: Patrick Elkins-Zeglarski
    Day 7: donnie l. betts
    Day 8: Night of the Living Dead
    Day 9: The Killer Kids of Miscast
    Day 10: Jason Sherwood
    Day 11: Leslie O'Carroll and Steve Wilson
    Day 12: Jonathan Scott-McKean
    Day 13: Jake Mendes
    Day 14: Charles R. MacLeod
    Day 15: Patty Yaconis
    Day 16: Daniel Langhoff
    Day 17: Colorado Shakespeare Festival costumers
    Day 18: Miriam Suzanne
    Day 19: Yolanda Ortega
    Day 20: Diana Ben-Kiki
    Day 21: Jeff Neuman
    Day 22: Gabriella Cavallero
    Day 23: Matthew Campbell
    Day 24: Sharon Kay White
    Day 25: John Hauser
    Day 26: Lon Winston
    Day 27: Jason Ducat
    Day 28: Sam Gregory
    Day 29: Warren Sherrill
    Day 30: The Women Who Run Theatre in Boulder
    Theatre Person of the Year Billie McBride
  • 2016 True West Award: Jason Sherwood

    by John Moore | Dec 10, 2016

    True West Award. The Coffin. Frankenstein. Jason Sherwood



    30 DAYS, 30 BOUQUETS

    Day 10:
    Jason Sherwood

         Scenic Designer, DCPA Theatre Company's Frankenstein

     
    When the audience walked into the Stage Theatre before Frankenstein even began, they could see it: An enormous mud floor with a big, open grave dug into the middle of it. And in the epic opening moment of the play, a massive wooden coffin as big as a house is hoisted out from the ground and rises slowly to reveal the mad scientist’s newly animated Creature standing underneath it, dazed from the first stages of embryonic consciousness.

    “It said to the audience from the very beginning that is an unnatural act to pull this thing out of the ground,” said Frankenstein Director Sam Buntrock.

    This “thing” - a monster of its own kind created from the imagination of groundbreaking Scenic Designer Jason Sherwood - would serve as Ground Zero for the alchemy of life, death and re-birth in Mary Shelley’s decidedly unnatural world where the roles of God and man, creator and creature are blended into a kind of operatic chaos.

    Frankenstein video: The coffin in the scene shop:

     

    This monstrous coffin, a wooden amalgam of many disparate parts, was playfully hyperbolized not only to toy with the audience’s perspective, but more literally because it represented 10 coffins – one for each of the corpses from whom The Creature was assembled.  

    Frankenstein Coffin. True West AwardsAnd it never left the audience’s sight. When the action moved, the coffin morphed with it, serving as an ingenious projection screen with complimentary effects designed by Charlie I. Miller and lighting designer Brian Tovar.

    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'

    “So when The Creature goes into the woods, the coffin grows greenery, and moss attaches to it,” Buntrock said. “When he sets fire to the cabin, it burns, too. And when we go to the Alps, which is where the central scene in the play takes place, the coffin becomes the Alps." In a stunning transformation, the coffin comes down from above and the climactic fight between the two men occurs on top of it. “And in the end, it engulfs them," Buntrock said.

    “This served not only as a constant reminder of Victor's act of obscene creation, but also of the death dance that it locked the two main characters into.”

    Frankenstein video: The coffin on the stage:

     

    It was breathtaking – a set piece worthy of its own curtain bow. And it was just one innovative way Sherwood played with perspective. For example, when The Creature murders Frankenstein's 6-year-old brother and leaves him in a small boat, Sherwood did not just have the boat float up to the doctor with a little body inside that an audience would not have been able to see. Sherwood instead had the boat shoot up vertically from below like a tectonic plate, allowing us to fully see the wee corpse at the same time Frankenstein does.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    “Jason’s scenic design for Frankenstein was audacious in its simplicity, eschewing naturalism to allow a continuous and uninterrupted flow of action,” said Buntrock. Sherwood created fire, rain and snow. He was not safe, timid or even slightly subtle. “No, this was life and death. Big and bold,” said Buntrock.

    Just like Shelley’s gothic masterpiece.

    Jason

    ABOUT THE TRUE WEST AWARDS
    The True West Awards, now in their 16th year, began as the Denver Post Ovation Awards in 2001. DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore — along with additional voices from around the state — celebrate the entire local theatre community by recognizing 30 achievements from 2016 over 30 days, without categories or nominations. Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center's Senior Arts Journalist. His daily coverage of the DCPA and the Colorado theatre community can be found at MyDenverCenter.Org

    THE 2016 TRUE WEST AWARDS
    Day 1: Jada Suzanne Dixon
    Day 2: Robert Michael Sanders
    Day 3: After Orlando
    Day 4: Michael Morgan
    Day 5: Beth Beyer
    Day 6: Patrick Elkins-Zeglarski
    Day 7: donnie l. betts
    Day 8: Night of the Living Dead
    Day 9: The Killer Kids of Miscast
    Day 10: Jason Sherwood
    Day 11: Leslie O'Carroll and Steve Wilson
    Day 12: Jonathan Scott-McKean
    Day 13: Jake Mendes
    Day 14: Charles R. MacLeod
    Day 15: Patty Yaconis
    Day 16: Daniel Langhoff
    Day 17: Colorado Shakespeare Festival costumers
    Day 18: Miriam Suzanne
    Day 19: Yolanda Ortega
    Day 20: Diana Ben-Kiki
    Day 21: Jeff Neuman
    Day 22: Gabriella Cavallero
    Day 23: Matthew Campbell
    Day 24: Sharon Kay White
    Day 25: John Hauser
    Day 26: Lon Winston
    Day 27: Jason Ducat
    Day 28: Sam Gregory
    Day 29: Warren Sherrill
    Day 30: The Women Who Run Theatre in Boulder
    Theatre Person of the Year Billie McBride

    Frankenstein. Jason Sherwood. Mark Junek. Adams VisCom'Frankenstein,' designed by Jason Sherwood and featuring Mark Junek, above, who alternated with Sullivan Jones playing Frankenstein and The Creature. Photo by  Adams VisCom.
  • Photos: Opening Night of 'Frankenstein'

    by John Moore | Oct 11, 2016
    'Frankenstein' in Denver
    To see more photos from Opening Night of 'Frankenstein,' click the forward arrow on the image above.


    The DCPA NewsCenter takes you backstage before all DCPA Theatre Company opening nights, offering a glimpse of the actors in preparation, and following through to the post-show celebration.

    In the Theatre Company’s new staging of Frankenstein, which opened on Oct. 7, leading actors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek alternate nightly playing the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his creation.

    Our backstage visit includes watching the actors being fit with their wigs, as well as Junek inserting the colored contact lens that makes it look as if the monster has one yellow eye. When Jones plays the Creature, he wears the yellow lenses on both eyes. In the source novel, author Mary Shelley makes mention of the Creature having yellow eyes.

    Photos by John Moore and McKenzie Kielman for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Through Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 

    Previous NewsCenter coverage:
    Video series: Inside look at the making of Frankenstein
    Five things we learned about Frankenstein at Perspectives
    Photos, video: Your first look at our montage of Frankenstein scenes
    Frankenstein
    : On the making of a two-headed monster
    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white
    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    More 2016-17 DCPA Theatre Company 'Meet the Cast' profiles:

    Meet Mark Junek
    Meet Sullivan Jones
    Meet Jessica Robblee


    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

    'Frankenstein' cast members, from left, Erin Willis, Brynn Tucker and Nellesa Walthour. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

  • Video series: Inside look at the making of 'Frankenstein'

    by John Moore | Oct 06, 2016

    For every Theatre Company production, the DCPA NewsCenter takes you backstage for an inside look at the making of the show. For Frankenstein, we have broken up our tour into four short videos:

    Part 1: Interviews with Director Sam Buntock and lead actors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek

    Part 2: Bringing the scenic design to life with Technical Director Eric Rouse and House Foreman Doug Taylor

    Part 3: Touring the backstage scene shop

    Part 4: Costumes with Kevin Copenhaver

    Play the video above, and all four videos will play in succession. Or click on each individual link above.

    Videos by David Lenk and John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Through Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 

    Previous NewsCenter coverage:
    Five things we learned about Frankenstein at Perspectives
    Photos, video: Your first look at the making of Frankenstein
    Frankenstein
    : On the making of a two-headed monster
    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white
    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center

  • Five things we learned about 'Frankenstein'

    by John Moore | Oct 05, 2016

    From left: Kevin Copenhaver (costumes), Topher Blair (projections), Jason Sherwood (scenic design), Brian Tovar (lighting), Sam Buntrock (director), Curtis Craig (sound), and actors Max Woertendyke, Molly Carden and Thaddeus Fitzpatrick. Photo by McKenzie Kielman for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    "Perspectives" is a series of free conversations with DCPA Theatre Company cast and crew on the evening of each show's first preview performance (except A Christmas Carol). On Sept. 30, DCPA Senior Arts Journalist John Moore was joined by nine members of the Frankenstein team. Here’s some of what we learned:

    1 PerspectivesThis is a stage play, but it might as well be an action film. Playwright Nick Dear's script consists of 30 scenes, but they take less than two hours to play out. "The first 20 scenes are over in the first half an hour," Director Sam Buntrock said. And why the eventual change in tempo? “At the beginning of the story, the Creature has almost no language skills, so the first five scenes have almost no dialogue. But as the Creature experiences more of the world, and as he learns to communicate better, the play elongates and becomes more conventional." 

    2 PerspectivesCostumer Kevin Copenhaver said the creative team was not interested in furthering the popular cultural depiction of Frankenstein as the neck-bolted, square-headed monster we know from the 1931 Boris Karloff film. Nor the more recent National Theatre approach in London, which turned the monster into something of a mod zipperhead. “When reading Mary Shelley’s book, I was really struck by when she said the Creature had yellow eyes,” Copenhaver said. So the two actors who play the Creature in Denver will be wearing yellow color contacts, and their teeth will be fitted with iron. “But otherwise the monster will appear to be disturbingly normal,” Copenhaver said, in part to force audiences to confront their own feelings about difference and “otherness.” The less freakish this Creature looks, the more disturbing it should be that this society rejects him anyway. (Photo: Sullivan Jones and Charlie Korman by AdamsVisCom.)

    3 PerspectivesJason Sherwood admitted that his vibrant scenic deign, which features one massive (and surprise) overhanging set piece, created a nightmare for Lighting Designer Brian Tovar and others on the creative team. Everywhere a lighting designer might normally expect to place lights, Sherwood has invaded his space with hanging set pieces, as well as accommodation for rain, snow and fire. “The whole team had to get creative all around because of me, and I apologize for that,” Sherwood said with a laugh.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    4 Perspectives Frankenstein PerspectivesActors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek, the actors who will alternate playing the roles of Dr. Frankenstein and his Creature, have been encouraged to go their own ways – and that freedom affects everyone else on and around the stage. Said ensemble actor Molly Carden: “One thing Sam kept repeating to us was, 'If you are going to have two people play the same role on different nights, you don't want it to be the same performance. That would be antithetical to the whole premise.' ” Or, as Buntrock puts it: “I can't cram one person's performance into another person's. Sometimes I have to keep reminding myself that this show is not the same for both people. It can't be.” That freedom not only means two actors interpreting the text differently, but also having the liberty to move about differently on the stage. That requires flexibility from the acting ensemble, the audience and even the technical crew - specifically, the person operating the lights. “That’s because Mark and Sullivan aren’t always in the same place on the stage each night, even though they are saying the same words,” actor Thaddeus Fitzpatrick said. (Photo: Sam Buntrock by By McKenzie Kielman for the DCPA NewsCenter.)

    5 PerspectivesDenver Center newcomer Max Woertendyke plays a gentleman named Felix de Lacey, a man who is devoted to his family and mistress. In fact, Felix is kind, educated, and gentle to all — save for the poor monster. Just a few months ago, Woertendyke was part of the Broadway ensemble of A View From the Bridge, which won the Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play. “Just to clarify - I don’t think I was the one who got it for us,” joked Woertendyke, who understudied the roles of Louis and Marco.

    6 PerspectivesBonus: Mary Shelley’s source novel turns 200 years old this year. And yet surely some audience members will be experiencing the story for the first time. “I don’t want to spoil the story for anyone - but it's about a monster,” Buntrock said with a laugh.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.

    The next Perspectives will cover The Book of Will at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, in the Jones Theatre. It’s free.


    Photo gallery: The making of Frankenstein in Denver:

    'Frankenstein' in Denver

    To see more photos, click the arrow on the image above. All photos by John Moore and McKenzie Kielman for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Through Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Photos, video: Your first look at the making of Frankenstein
    Frankenstein
    : On the making of a two-headed monster
    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white
    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center

  • Photos, video: First look at DCPA's 'Frankenstein'

    by John Moore | Oct 04, 2016



    First video (above) and photos (below) of the DCPA Theatre Company's Frankenstein, opening Oct. 7. Video by DCPA Video Producer David Lenk. Photos by AdamsVisCom. To see more photos, click the forward arrow on the image below. The production, directed by Sam Buntrock, features actors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek alternating in the roles of Dr. Frankenstein and The Creature. 

    Frankenstein- 2016-17 Theatre Company Season

    Cast list

    • Mark Junek as Victor Frankenstein and his Creature
    • Sullivan Jones as Victor Frankenstein and his Creature
    • Molly Carden as Agatha/Ensemble
    • Thaddeus Fitzpatrick as Rab/Ensemble
    • Meridith C. Grundei as Servant/Ensemble and understudy to Gretel
    • John Hauser as Understudy to Felix/Rab
    • Charlie Korman as William
    • Jenny Leona as Elizabeth/Ensemble
    • Avi Levin as understudy to William
    • Rodney Lizcano as Gustav/Constable/Ensemble
    • Conan McCarty as Klaus/Ensemble
    • Kevin McGuire as De Lacey/M. Frankenstein
    • Leigh Nichols Miller as understudy to Victor/Gustav/Constable
    • Douglas Rees as Ewan/Ensemble
    • Jessica Robblee as Clarice/Gretel/Ensemble
    • Brian Shea as understudy to Klaus/De Lacey/Ewan
    • Brynn Tucker as understudy to Female Creature/Servants
    • Nellesa Walthour as Female Creature/Ensemble
    • Erin Willis as Servant/Ensemble, and understudy to Agatha/Clarice
    • Max Woertendyke as Felix and understudy to The Creature

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Through Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Frankenstein: On the making of a two-headed monster
    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white
    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

  • 'Frankenstein': The making of a two-headed monster

    by John Moore | Sep 30, 2016
    Director Sam Buntrock, on the benefit to audiences of seeing his 'Frankenstein' twice. His two leading actors will rotate nightly in the roles of Dr. Frankenstein and the Creature. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter. 


    Frankenstein is a play in a hurry, says Director Sam Buntrock. So the first thing Denver Center audiences will notice is that playwright Nick Dear has sliced off the first 100 pages of Mary Shelley’s classic source novel. The Theatre Company’s new staging opens instead with a birth – the animation of Victor Frankenstein’s hideous collection of moribund corpse parts. 

    "Nick Dear is not interested in how we got there,” said Buntrock, whose live visual feast has its first preview performance tonight (Sept. 30) in the Stage Theatre. “There is very little backstory. It relies on you already knowing the story, which is smart. Frankenstein is so culturally understood that it’s a word we use every day. It’s in our lexicon. The play knows that.

    "The fundamental moment is really when the Creature is born – and everything else is just claptrap.”

    The second thing audiences will notice is that Buntrock’s two leading actors alternate nightly playing the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his creation. In Denver, that will be Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek, who says this play is also not at all interested in the science of how the Creature comes to life. Instead it simply assumes that the Creature, despite being assembled from a variety of cadavers, is indeed a singular human being – and therefore capable of basic human traits including learning, memory, love and suffering.

    “I think there is sort of a supernatural quality about this version of the Creature,” said Junek. “It is an almost fully formed human being but it has no impressions of humanity. So I think of it more as an alien - someone who has never directly experienced society or humanity before, but yet has a full capacity to learn."

    Except, as the well-known story goes, this society will not have it. Or him. Or any other Other. And we witness the lethal, legal and moral fallout.

    A tag-team wrestling event

    The challenge for both the director and his entire ensemble of actors is that they have essentially created two different plays - in just more than a month of rehearsal.

    A Frankenstein actors“My approach was to first find out who Mark and Sullivan are as actors and then work out their needs,” said Buntrock. “Even though they are playing the two leading characters, there are huge sections where they aren’t interacting with each other onstage. So I have isolated them a lot of the time - and it’s been interesting to watch them because they both come to the exact same conclusions some of the time, and at other times they come up with their own versions.”

    Sullivan compares those first few days of rehearsal to WWF tag-team wrestling. “One guy goes in and he puts the other guy in a headlock. Then he tags out, and the other guy does it. That's kind of what we have been doing.”

    Junek said he and Jones were freely stealing from one another other in the first few days of rehearsals. But once Buntrock isolated the actors, Jones added, “that freed us up to kind of craft our own performances.”

    By encouraging his actors to go their own ways, Junek said, “I think Sam is admitting the obvious, which is that we are very different people, and we bring different things to the roles.”

    But the more the actors explore the parallel lives of Frankenstein and his Creature, Sullivan says, the more they are discovering that there is more to this role-reversal idea than the actors simply trading places. The refined man of science and his hideous creation, they have discovered, essentially trade places themselves by the end of the story.

    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white

    “The more we do this, the more clear it becomes that they are of the same cloth,” Sullivan said. “They are the same person. They are mirrors of each other. Or shadows.”

    Buntrock promises a special satisfaction, he said, for those audiences who come back and see the play twice. (On Saturdays, audiences can see the play twice on the same day.)

    “This is a play which really merits going back to anyway just because there are so many ideas in it, and it all happens so quickly,” Buntrock said. “It’s almost like one of those great films that you want to go back and see again because you get so much more out of it the second time. I think these are two phenomenal actors, and it’s a real treat to see what they both bring to it individually.”

    'Frankenstein' stars Sullivan Jones, left, and Mark Junek.

    'Frankenstein' stars Sullivan Jones, left, and Mark Junek. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter 



    For Buntrock, a Tony Award nomination at 32

    Buntrock’s life fundamentally changed at age 32 when he became one of the youngest directors ever to be nominated for a Tony Award, for the revival of Stephen Sondheim’s Sunday in the Park with George. Buntrock’s innovative infusion of animation and projected color not only helped the audience to visualize the brilliance of Georges Seurat’s perplexing, 1884 abstract masterpiece A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte – it has been credited with forever changing the role and expectations of multimedia in live theatre. The next year, for example, Les Misérables was reimagined without a barricade but with 180-degree scenographic projections of revolutionary Paris streets in its place.

     “We used projection to allow us to really tell the journey of the painting, starting as a charcoal line across the page all the way through to the last dab of paint,” said Buntrock. Ben Brantley of the New York Times said Buntrock “used 21st-century technology to convey the vision of a 19th-century Pointillist to truly enchanting effect.” But despite the “rhapsody of images” that Buntrock kept unfolding before the audience, “the great gift of this production,” Brantley wrote, “was its quiet insistence that looking is the art by which all people shape their lives.”

    The Tony Award nomination opened doors for Buntrock, who has been living and working in the United States exclusively since 2011. “It’s the reason I have a career here,” said Buntrock, who added with a laugh, “It also means my name now has the words ‘Tony nominee’ in front of it in anything I read.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    In 2013, Buntrock accepted an invitation to direct the DCPA Theatre Company’s world premiere of Ed/Downloaded. How could he not? Playwright Michael Mitnick wrote the play specifically for Buntrock. The story is set in the near future, when you will be able to download your 10 favorite memories when you die - essentially leaving behind a carefully curated if not necessarily accurate representation of your life. When Ed dies and his girlfriend discovers he was cheating her, she sets about to change his digital scrapbook.

    A_Sunday_on_La_Grande_JatteThe fun for Buntrock was combining live theatre with filmic elements. “So for example, in one scene, our theatrical reality is that the actors on the stage are in the woods,” Buntrock said. “But when we see the memory that goes with it, it’s Ed having been filmed in the real woods. It was extraordinary fun to play with those realities off each other.”

    (Pictured above right: Georges Seurat’s 'A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.')

    Buntrock loved “working with such incredible artists across the board at the Denver Center,” he said. “So when it came to being asked to come back for Frankenstein, of course I said yes.”

    His expertise in animation and visual stimulation very much informs his approach to Frankenstein, which will include fire, rain, snow … “all of the elements,” he said.

    Frankenstein“We are using a lot of technology. It’s not really that literal of a production. It’s much more evocative and suggestive than architectural. (Scenic Designer) Jason Sherwood, (Lighting Designer) Brian Tovar and (Projections Specialist) Charlie Miller have been working so hard with technology and with lights to find a way to make that organic and real and of the theatre, rather than seem superimposed.”

    Buntrock has carried his greatest takeaway from Sunday in the Park with George with him to Frankenstein: It’s best, he said, when you take something that's big … and distill it down.

    “I am interested in diluting rather than complicating,” Buntrock said. “We had all this amazing technology to play with 10 years ago on Sunday in the Park with George, but a lot of our work was spent trying to find the smallest thing. Our challenge was how to use projection and strong, bold, almost filmic imagery onstage in a way that still allowed the audience’s imagination to engage.

    “The most powerful thing that I have in my tool set as an director is an audience’s imagination.”


    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.

     


    Photo gallery: More on the making of Frankenstein in Denver

    'Frankenstein' in Denver
    Photos from the making of 'Frankenstein' in Denver. To see more, click the forward arrow in the image above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Frankenstein and race: It IS a matter of black and white
    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

  • Frankenstein: It is a matter of black and white

    by John Moore | Sep 23, 2016
    DCPA Theatre Company Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.
    DCPA Theatre Company Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Much has been made of the mirrored relationship between Man and Maker in Mary Shelley’s enduring Gothic classic, Frankenstein. Creator and Cadaver. Father and Son. God and Man.

    The DCPA Theatre Company’s upcoming new staging of Frankenstein explores a whole new and incendiary duality: Black and white.

    Frankenstein is, of course, the familiar story of the young science student who assembles a living being from parts of exhumed corpses. In 2011, London’s National Theatre did some Frankenstein-like reanimating of its own when it breathed astonishing new life into Shelley’s nearly 200-year-old horror story. Noted film director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting) and playwright Nick Dear had their two leading actors alternate nightly playing the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his creation. Returning audiences not only got to consider how differently the two actors approached the same roles, they got to witness Son become Father. Man become God.

    The National Theatre staging was a sensation. Now, five years later, the DCPA becomes the first theatre company in North America to revivify the London creation. DCPA Director Sam Buntrock and Artistic Director Kent Thompson will also have their actors trade roles. But there’s more. At a time when racial tensions in America are at their highest levels in 40 years, acclaimed actors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek have been cast to play Frankenstein and The Creature.

    Jones is black. Junek is white. And Thompson knows that may take on added visual significance with today’s audiences, because one more vital relationship between the story’s two archetypal characters is dominance and submission. Master and Slave.

    Thompson is often known to cast actors of color to play characters traditionally played by white actors. So that’s nothing new. But in a year of ever-escalating racial tension in America that flared anew this week in Charlotte and Tulsa, yes, Thompson says, he is trying to make a statement. A bold one about “the complex ways people from different cultures and classes relate to one another,” Thompson said. “And I’m highlighting that by having actors of two different races switching in these two roles.”

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    A notable departure from Shelley’s source novel is the newly adapted play’s primary focus on The Creature - grotesque as he is, and yet childlike in his innocence. The real horror of Shelley’s story is not those silly (and jettisoned) neck bolts made famous by Boris Karloff. It is the doctor’s blithe rejection of his bewildered creature, and casting him out into a hostile world. Meeting with cruelty wherever he goes, The Creature grows increasingly vengeful. And that all will inevitably look different to a contemporary audience on the nights when Jones is the actor playing the unfairly beaten creature. And that’s OK, says Thompson.

    “I don't know that we’ll ever be a post-racial society,” he said. “But I hope one day we will be post-racist.”

    Buntrock, who is British, said the instinct to cast one Frankenstein Quote. Sam Buntrock white and one African-American actor in the rotating roles was not so much to make some great social statement, but rather stems from a responsibility he feels, and Thompson shares, to increase diversity in the theatre.

    "The impulse came from the notion that the boundaries of casting must be brought down," Buntrock  said. "It's irresponsible in this day and age to be locked into one sense of how a character should look."

    That said, he has talked at length with his actors about the impact this particular casting may have on audiences. "Yes, I am interested in what that provokes in the viewer," he said. "And this is going to bring the audience face-to-face with their attitudes."

    The supreme challenge of two actors having to bring two entire characters to life on alternating nights is affords a rich and rare creative opportunity for potential audiences.

    “In the original London production the reviewers and the audiences were fascinated at how differently they approached each character,” Thompson said. “They were not the exact same performance, and the dynamic between them changed.”


    Frankenstein actors

    DCPA actors Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek will rotate and alternate in portraying Frankenstein and his Creature.


    The New York Times critic Ben Brantley found it thrilling to attend Frankenstein on successive nights in London. “Watching each of these actors find their feet and test their body parts is such a dizzy high point that it can’t be topped,” he wrote. And their approaches are just different enough to make you want to see both.”

    Those who do will see that Frankenstein continues to strike disturbingly urgent chords that go far beyond race, and encompassing “otherness” of all kinds.

    “There are many other things that make The Creature scary,” said Thompson. “There’s his deformity. That he can’t talk. That he seems to be brutish.”

    “Otherness” tends to evoke ignorance, cruelty and fear, said Thompson, who is fascinated by what makes “otherness” frightening to other people in the first place, be it disability, skin color … or even a person’s presidential preference.

    Frankenstein Quote. Kent Thompson“All of that fear multiplies once you start to consider race and culture and age and political opinions,” said Thompson. “It’s easy to demonize the person on the other side of an issue. That is going on all over America today. The challenge we are left is: “How do we stop demonizing each other?’”

    Thompson pointed out that the man in power in this scenario – the omnipotent doctor – would likely fall somewhere squarely on what we would call “the autism spectrum” today.

    "He’s a genius, but his ability to emotionally respond and psychologically understand the consequences of his actions has been thwarted,” Thompson said. Yet, he holds the power to create life in his hands as surely as a gun would hold the power to end it.”

    But while the landmark London staging offered audiences a whole new way of looking at the Frankenstein myth - as will the DCPA’s team of designers and actors – “None of that profoundly changes the major theme of the piece,” Thompson said. Which is, essentially: “Is it even ethically appropriate for man to create life? I mean, once you start down that road, how do you stop?”


    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.


    Photo gallery: More on the making of Frankenstein in Denver

    'Frankenstein' in Denver
    Photos from the making of 'Frankenstein' in Denver. To see more, click the forward arrow in the image above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Breathing life into the Frankenstein set: 'It's alive!'
    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    How Danny Boyle infused new life into Frankenstein
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

  • How Danny Boyle infused new life into 'Frankenstein'

    by John Moore | Sep 11, 2016

    Left, film and TV stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller originated the alternating stage roles of the Creator and Creature in the National Theatre of London's 'Frankenstein.' Now taking on the challenge for the DCPA Theatre Company are Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek.


    In 2011, actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller infused new life into the iconic story of the mad doctor who, ironically, also infused new life into
    a cadaver.

    Frankenstein had been done to death. There have been more than 100 films, ranging from Boris Karloff’s definitive 1931 portrayal to Mel Brooks’ silly movie and musical parodies. Hard as it might be to believe, Mary Shelley’s classic story turns 200 years old this year. No longer the Modern Prometheus it was originally billed to be.

    But the National Theatre’s 2011 stage adaptation was different. The two film stars not only took to the London stage to play the Scientist and the Creature. They traded roles in alternating performances. And the twist was not merely a clever way of intriguing audiences into wanting to see the play twice (though thousands did). It returned the story’s focus to Shelley’s central literary premise, that the Scientist and the Creature were both bonded, distorted and, most importantly, mirror images of each other. They were equals.

    Denver Director Sam Buntrock: 'It's life and death. It's big and bold.'

    Nick Dear’s script, which will be staged for the first time outside of London with a new cast and creative team by the DCPA Theatre Company starting Sept. 30, is perhaps the only Frankenstein to tell the story of the narcissistic Scientist who builds a man in his own image from the Creature’s voice and point of view.
     
    London audiences were overwhelmed. One of Britain’s leading critics called it “a memorable production that will doubtless be spoken of for years to come.” Since then, the performance has been repeatedly broadcast at cinemas throughout America. 

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    The idea to have both actors play both roles — a device that will be continued in Denver — was National Theatre Director Danny Boyle’s. It came to him when he recalled seeing a Royal Shakespeare Company production of Richard II as a lad that had the actors playing Richard and Bolingbroke trading parts on alternating nights. The trick can only work when the story is right, and Boyle believes that for Frankenstein, it works.
     
    “It’s set in a time where science gives man the right to confront his creator,” Boyle said. “Before then, man has been naturally taken for granted. Now, he can create life himself. It no longer has to be darkness. Now he can create his own light, and therefore he can become the equal of his creator. So to bond the two actors together equally in all ways creates a wonderful dynamic on the stage.”

    The U.S. premiere of Nick Dear’s adaptation of Frankenstein will be directed by Sam Buntrock, who is returning to the DCPA after having directed the 2013 world premiere of Ed, Downloaded. Buntrock’s Broadway credits include Sunday in the Park with George. The Denver company will be led by Sullivan Jones (the original Cassius Clay in Rogue Machine Theatre’s production of One Night in Miami…) and Mark Junek (Broadway’s The Performers) alternating performances in the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his Creature. COMPLETE DENVER CASTING

    Pictured above: Sheila Morris of the DCPA Costume Department shows two versions of the same Frankenstein costume under construction for each of the Theatre Company's two actors who will alternate in the role. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    The Danny Boyle quote above comes from an interview by Christopher Frayling at the National Theatre. WATCH THE VIDEO


    Photo gallery: The making of Frankenstein in Denver

    'Frankenstein' in Denver
    Photos from the making of 'Frankenstein' in Denver. To see more, click the forward arrow in the image above. Photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Frankenstein trivia: The actors who played the two main characters in London (Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller), both play Sherlock Holmes in different TV series: Sherlock and Elementary, respectively.

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

     

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    A Frankenstein 'that will make The Bible look subtle'
    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

  • This is a Frankenstein 'that will make the Bible look subtle'

    by John Moore | Aug 25, 2016
    Our Frankenstein photo gallery:

    'Frankenstein' in Denver

    Photos from the Aug. 23 first rehearsal for the DCPA Theatre Company’s 'Frankenstein,' opening Sept. 30 in the Stage Theatre. Above in shadow is Director Sam Buntrock. To see more photos, click here. All photos by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    We all learn at a very young age what that word means. Frankenstein: To bring a dead thing back to life. And so you know that anyone coming to see a play called Frankenstein already knows the essential story.

    Frankenstein Sullivan Jones, Mark Junek That’s why Director Sam Buntrock promises his upcoming production of Frankenstein will hit the ground running.

    “This is not an upper West Side play about relationships,” Buntrock said. “It’s do-or-die. It's life and death. It's big and bold.”

    This is a tale, Buntrock says, “that makes the Bible look subtle.”

    Buntrock, who was nominated for a Tony Award for his direction of Sunday In The Park With George, and his creative team introduced their visions at Tuesday’s opening rehearsal for the DCPA Theatre Company’s production opening Sept. 30 in the Stage Theatre. When Buntrock and Scenic Designer Jason Sherwood began their work on the play, he said, they hit on their catchphrase instantly:

    “We agreed that it needs to be really (messed) up,” Buntrock said.

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter

    The DCPA is the first theatre company in North America to stage Nick Dear’s adaptation of  Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which was a global sensation at London’s National Theatre in 2011. The story of the creature who is given a troubled heart from a creator with a troubled heart came with an electrifying twist that will be twisted further in Denver: The lead actors (Sullivan Jones and Mark Junek, pictured above right) will alternate performances playing the roles of Frankenstein and The Creature.

    Frankenstein Sam Buntrock

    At the first rehearsal, Director Sam Buntrock flipped a coin to determine whether alternating actors Mark Junek or Sullivan Jones would read that day as The Creature or The Creator. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

    Here are five things we learned about the DCPA’s staging at the first gathering of cast and crew:

    1 PerspectivesThe script was written like a screenplay. Nick Dear wrote this stage adaptation specifically for noted filmmaker Danny Boyle (Trainspotting). So, no surprise – he wrote it in much the same way he would have a film. “There are stage directions throughout the script that say, ‘Cut,’ or ‘Cut to ...” said Buntrock. “It very much is a screenplay for the stage. That meant we needed to allow for a speed and a clarity that removed any sense of the paraphernalia or clutter that we have come to associate with Frankenstein.” Sherwood says the scenery also honors a cinematic approach "in the way that we are shifting perspective and pulling the naturalism out of the scenes.” For example, rather than merely dragging a boat onto the stage from a wing, he said, “We are trying to show you something that flips the way you experience it, and changes the way you see it.”

    2 PerspectivesIt’s The Creature’s story now. A notable departure from Shelley’s source novel is how this adaptation focuses on The Creature - grotesque as he is, and yet childlike in his innocence. “I will continuously argue that this script is told completely from The Creature’s perspective,” Buntrock said. “The story begins with his birth. And he is born, essentially, as a grown-up baby.”

    3 PerspectivesThe play is still about relationships. Specifically, dysfunctional relationships. “I love that this is a play with two people – a slave and a master, a creature and a creator – who go through a series of arguments and misfortunes that afflict all of us as a human race,” Buntrock said. "The central question is particularly relevant to me now: Even if you could recreate life, should you? Here we have someone who creates – or recreates – life, and he just doesn't consider the consequences. So what if a person who manages to create life had no understanding of life himself, or of what it means to be alive?”

    4 PerspectivesFor Kent Thompson, it’s personal. The DCPA’s Producing Artistic Director is a diabetic, so he watches keenly for new developments in genetic modification. “I am always reading for when we are going to figure out how to get stem cells to recreate insulin in my body,” Thompson said. “Over and over again, you find all these charlatans, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, promising they can sell you stem cells that will cure your diabetes. And they are con men. But what about somebody who actually can create life, but has absolutely no forethought of the consequences because he just can’t understand it on an emotional or a psychological or a cultural or a societal level?”

    5 PerspectivesYou'll see fire, and you'll see rain. In every telling of the Frankenstein story, fire is a central plot point. That’s no spoiler. Here, there will be a cottage, “and we will set the door of that cottage on fire, literally,” Sherwood said. There is also a scene in a graveyard (again, no surprise), and it will not only rain onstage. “It's just going to downpour,” Sherwood said.

    John Moore was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the U.S by American Theatre Magazine in 2011. He has since taken a groundbreaking position as the Denver Center’s Senior Arts Journalist.

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

     

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    Frankenstein• Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829 


    Previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    Introducing DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season artwork
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    2016-17 season announcement

    Frankenstein first rehearsal.

    'Frankenstein' first rehearsal, above. Below: Charlie Korman, left, and Sullivan Jones (as The Creature.) Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.

  • DCPA Theatre Company announces 2016-17 directors

    by John Moore | Aug 18, 2016
    Christy Montour-Larson
    Christy Montour-Larson, left, shown at the 2016 Colorado Theatre Guild's Henry Awards, will return to the DCPA to direct the world premiere of 'Two Degrees.' Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    Jenn ThompsonThe DCPA Theatre Company's 2016-17 season will include a mix of five returning and three first-time company directors. Of note, half of the director slate is female. Part of the mission of the DCPA's Women's Voices Fund is to create both playwriting and directing opportunities for women, who are vastly under-represented on the national stage, according to several studies. (Pictured right: Jenn Thompson.)

    The directors are:

    The Glass Menagerie
    will be directed by Ina Marlowe (Producing Artistic Director of Touchstone Theatre and Organic Theatre Company). DCPA directorial debut.
     
    Frankenstein will be directed by Sam Buntrock (2008 Broadway Revival of Sunday in the Park with George, DCPA’s Ed Downloaded).
     
    MelissaRianAndersonA Christmas Carol will be directed by Melissa Rain Anderson (Utah Shakespeare Festival, Geva Theatre Center). DCPA directorial debut. (Pictured left.)
     
    'One Night in Miami' Director Carl Cofield at the first rehearsal at the DCPA. Photo by John Moore. The world premiere of The Book of Will will be directed by Davis McCallum (Off-Broadway’s The Harvest, London Wall). He also directed the Off-Broadway poduction of the DCPA world premiere, The Whale. DCPA directorial debut.
     
    The Christians will be directed by Producing Artistic Director Kent Thompson.

    The world premiere of Two Degrees will be directed by Christy Montour-Larson (DCPA's Shadowlands, The Giver).
     
    Disgraced will be directed by Carl Cofield (DCPA’s One Night in Miami, pictured above right).
     
    The Secret Garden
    will be directed by Jenn Thompson (DCPA’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike).




    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

    The Glass Menagerie: Ticket information
    • Sept. 9-Oct. 16
    • Ricketson Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 15
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    • Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829

    Selected previous NewsCenter coverage:

    Casting set for Frankenstein and The Glass Menagerie
    2016-17 season: Nine shows, two world premieres, return to classics
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    First rehearsal: This will be no wimpy Glass Menagerie

  • Casting set for 'Frankenstein' and 'The Glass Menagerie'

    by John Moore | Aug 17, 2016

    Frankenstein Sullivan Jones
    Sullivan Jones, left, was the original Cassius Clay in Center Stage's production of  'One Night in Miami…' opposite Esau Pritchett. Jones will alternate with Mark Junek in the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his Creature in the DCPA's 'Frankenstein.' Photo by Richard Anderson.


    FrankensteinThe DCPA Theatre Company today announced full casting for its first two productions of the 2016-17 season, The Glass Menagerie and Frankenstein. The lineup includes returning artists from previous seasons, new collaborators and familiar faces from the Colorado theatre community.

    The U.S. premiere of Nick Dear’s adaptation Frankenstein will be directed by Sam Buntrock, who is returning to the DCPA after having directed the 2013 world premiere of Ed, Downloaded. Buntrock’s directing credits include Sunday in the Park with George (Broadway, West End, Menier and 5th Avenue Seattle). The production won five Olivier Awards including Outstanding Musical Production and was nominated for nine Tony Awards including Best Director.

    The company of Frankenstein will be led by Sullivan Jones (the original Cassius Clay in Rogue Machine Theatre’s production of One Night in Miami…) and Mark Junek (Broadway’s The Performers) alternating performances in the roles of Victor Frankenstein and his Creature.

    Frankenstein will also feature ...

    • Molly Carden (DCPA Theatre Company debut) as Agatha/Ensemble
    • Thaddeus Fitzpatrick (2016 Colorado New Play Summit's The Book of Will) as Rab/Ensemble
    • Meridith C. Grundei (Off-Center’s Sweet & Lucky) as Servant/Ensemble and understudy to Gretel
    • Charlie Korman (DCPA’s Sweeney Todd, Lord of the Flies) as William/Ensemble
    • Jenny Leona (DCPA Theatre Company debut) as Elizabeth/Ensemble
    • Rodney Lizcano (DCPA’s A Christmas Carol) as Gustav/Constable/Ensemble
    • Conan McCarty as Klaus/Servant/Ensemble
    • Kevin McGuire (DCPA’s Sweeney Todd) as De Lacey/M. Frankenstein/Ensemble
    • Douglas Rees (DCPA Theatre Company debut) as Ewan/Ensemble
    • Jessica Robblee (DCPA’s All The Way) as Clarice/Gretel/Ensemble
    • Nellesa Walthour (National tour of The Lion King, DCPA Theater Company debut) as Female Creature/Ensemble
    • Erin Willis (DCPA’s All The Way, A Christmas Carol) as Servant/Ensemble, and understudy to Agatha/Clarice
    • Max Woertendyke (Broadway’s A View From the Bridge, DCPA Theatre Company debut) as Felix and understudy to The Creature.

    • Additional understudies:

    • John Hauser (Off-Center’s Sweet & Lucky) will understudy Felix and Rab
    • Avi Levin (DCPA’s A Christmas Carol) will understudy William
    • Leigh Nichols Miller (Off-Center’s Sweet & Lucky, DCPA’s Jackie and Me) will understudy Victor/Gustav/Constable
    • Brian Shea (DCPA’s Death of a Salesman) will understudy Klaus/De Lacey/M. Frankenstein
    • Brynn Tucker (DCPA Theatre Company Debut) will understudy the Female Creature

    The creative team includes Jason Sherwood (Scenic Designer), Kevin Copenhaver (Costume Designer), Brian Tovar (Lighting Designer), Curtis Craig (Sound Designer), Charlie I. Miller (Projection Designer), and Douglas Langworthy (Dramaturg).

    More Colorado theatre coverage on the DCPA NewsCenter


    From left: Amelia Pedlow, Aubrey Deeker, Kathleen McCall and John Skelley. Photo by John Moore for the DCPA NewsCenter.


    The Glass Menagerie:

    The Glass MenagerieAs previously reported in the DCPA NewsCenter, Ina Marlowe will make her DCPA Theatre Company directorial debut with The Glass Menagerie. Regionally, Marlowe has directed for the Utah Shakespeare Festival, the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Germinal Stage-Denver and served as the Producing Artistic Director for three companies in Chicago (Touchstone Theatre, Organic Theatre Company, The Library Theatre).

    This production, the Theatre Company's first to tackle Tennessee Williams' first play, reunites three cast members from the Theatre Company’s 2014 production of Hamlet.

    The Glass Menagerie will feature ...

    • Aubrey Deeker (Hamlet in DCPA’s Hamlet) as Tom
    • Kathleen McCall (DCPA’s Benediction, Gertrude in Hamlet) as Amanda
    • Amelia Pedlow (Ophelia in DCPA’s Hamlet) as Laura
    • John Skelley (DCPA Theatre Company debut) as The Gentleman Caller

    The creative team includes Joseph P. Tilford (Scenic Designer), Meghan Anderson Doyle (Costume Designer), Charles R. MacLeod (Lighting Designer), Tyler Nelson (Sound Designer), and Stephanie Prugh (Dramaturg).

    Follow the DCPA on social media @DenverCenter and through the DCPA News Center.

    The Glass Menagerie: Ticket information
    • Sept. 9-Oct. 16
    • Ricketson Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 15
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829

    Frankenstein: Ticket information
    • Sept. 30-Oct. 30
    • Stage Theatre
    • ASL interpreted, Audio-described and Open Captioned performance: Oct. 23
    • Tickets: 303-893-4100 or BUY ONLINE
    • Groups: Call 303-446-4829

    Additional The Glass Menagerie photos:

    'The Glass Menagerie' in Denver

    To see more photos, click on the forward arrow on the image above.


    Selected previous NewsCenter coverage:

    2016-17 season: Nine shows, two world premieres, return to classics
    Kent Thompson on The Bard, The Creature and the soul of his audience
    First rehearsal: This will be no wimpy Glass Menagerie
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ABOUT THE EDITOR
John Moore
John Moore
Award-winning arts journalist John Moore has recently taken a groundbreaking new position as the DCPA’s Senior Arts Journalist. With The Denver Post, he was named one of the 12 most influential theater critics in the US by American Theatre Magazine. He is the founder of the Denver Actors Fund, a nonprofit that raises money for local artists in medical need. John is a native of Arvada and attended Regis Jesuit High School and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Follow him on Twitter @moorejohn.

DCPA is the nation’s largest not-for-profit theatre organization dedicated to creating unforgettable shared experiences through beloved Broadway musicals, world-class plays, educational programs and inspired events. We think of theatre as a spark of life — a special occasion that’s exciting, powerful and fun. Join us today and we promise an experience you won't soon forget.